Rangoon creeper

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mani nair

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Sep 5, 2010, 8:09:38 AM9/5/10
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Dear friends,

Sending photos of  flowers of Rangoon Creeper.

Date :   June 2010
Place :  Pattambi, Kerala


Regards,

Mani.
rangoon.JPG
rangoon2.JPG
rangoon3.JPG

Selvalakshmi Selvaraj

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Sep 5, 2010, 8:57:16 AM9/5/10
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this is Quisqualis indica mani ji

--
Selvalakshmi S.
Doctoral Scholar,
Bharathiar University,
Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu.

Inderjeet Sethi

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Sep 5, 2010, 9:22:05 AM9/5/10
to Selvalakshmi Selvaraj, mani nair, indian...@googlegroups.com
I remember as kids we used to stick petals of these flowers on our nails and show off to our friends that we have long nails. These days we get artificial nails which last for a long time. But this was a temporary fixation.
--
~ik~
Dr.Inderjeet Kaur Sethi
Associate Professor
Department of Botany
SGTB Khalsa College
University of Delhi
Delhi-110007
M: 9818775237

tanay bose

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Sep 5, 2010, 10:27:29 AM9/5/10
to Inderjeet Sethi, Selvalakshmi Selvaraj, mani nair, indian...@googlegroups.com
Quisqualis indica indeed a good place for butterflies
Tanay

--
Tanay Bose
Research Assistant & Teaching Assistant
Department of Botany
University of British Columbia
3529-6270 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4 (Canada)
Phone: 778-323-4036

nabha meghani

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Sep 6, 2010, 10:21:44 AM9/6/10
to mani nair, indian...@googlegroups.com
Madhumalati in marathi?

Satish Phadke

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Sep 6, 2010, 11:37:09 AM9/6/10
to mani nair, indian...@googlegroups.com
Chinese Honeysuckle/ Rangoon creeper/ Madhumalati are such  good names and the botanical name of this Combretaceae member Quisqualis indica is like a combination of name of cars.
Satish Phadke

Tabish

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Sep 6, 2010, 12:50:21 PM9/6/10
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Hindi: मधु मालती Madhu Malati • Manipuri: পারিজাত Parijat • Marathi:
Vilayati chambeli • Tamil: Irangun malli • Bengali: মধুমংজরী
Madhumanjari • Urdu: Ishq pechaan عسق پیچاں
The Urdu name is most interesting, translating to, twists and turns of
love! :-)
- Tabish

mani nair

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Sep 6, 2010, 12:55:53 PM9/6/10
to Tabish, efloraofindia
Thanks Selvalakshmi ji, Inderjeet ji, Tanay ji, Nalini ji, Satish ji and Tabish ji for the ID and local names of this flower.

Regards,

Mani.

Padmini Raghavan

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Sep 6, 2010, 2:05:32 PM9/6/10
to Tabish, efloraofindia
I thought the Latin name was most amusing; 
"Quisqualis" means"What is this?"
 
Btw, this is another of the plants which I have not been able to see setting seeds, either in Chennai or in Secunderabad.
Cheers,
Padmini Raghavan.

On Mon, Sep 6, 2010 at 10:20 PM, Tabish <tab...@gmail.com> wrote:

Pankaj Oudhia

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Sep 6, 2010, 2:12:54 PM9/6/10
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Tabish ji,

  Many herbs are known as Isq Pencha. Ipomoea quamoclit is one of these. I am reading this name for Quisqualis first time. One of the local names of Quisqualis is Laung Lata. Laung means Clove and Lata means climber. I know it from this name from my childhood. It is different from Bengali sweet dish Laung Lata which actually have clove as ingredient. Ludiwigia is also known as Laung phool due to floral structure looks like Clove specially Ludwigia octovalvis.

Just for information.

regards

Pankaj Oudhia 

On Mon, Sep 6, 2010 at 10:20 PM, Tabish <tab...@gmail.com> wrote:

Dinesh Valke

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Sep 6, 2010, 2:14:43 PM9/6/10
to Padmini Raghavan, Tabish, efloraofindia
... also finding this plant to have flowers strangely different from rest of the family members.
Regards.

Tabish

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Sep 6, 2010, 2:42:54 PM9/6/10
to efloraofindia
Padmini, yes I forgot, the genus name is indeed the most interesting.
However, "Quisqualis" means "who" and "what" or "what kind". One
online botanical dictionary states:
From the Latin quis ("who") and qualis ("what kind"), referring to
the uncertainty of its family when first discovered.
One (less convincing) argument is that it may have to do with the
plant starting out as a shrub and then growing into a vine, or varing
color of the flowers.
- Tabish

On Sep 6, 11:05 pm, Padmini Raghavan <padi...@gmail.com> wrote:
> I thought the Latin name was most amusing;
> "Quisqualis" means"What is this?"
>
> Btw, this is another of the plants which I have not been able to see setting
> seeds, either in Chennai or in Secunderabad.
> Cheers,
> Padmini Raghavan.
>

Pankaj Kumar

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Sep 6, 2010, 2:53:43 PM9/6/10
to Tabish, efloraofindia
To be precise, "QUALIS" means "WHAT KIND OF". I imagine what "QUIS" mean?
Pankaj

--
***********************************************
"TAXONOMISTS GETTING EXTINCT AND SPECIES DATA DEFICIENT !!"


Pankaj Kumar Ph.D. (Orchidaceae)
Research Associate
Greater Kailash Sacred Landscape Project
Department of Habitat Ecology
Wildlife Institute of India
Post Box # 18
Dehradun - 248001, India

Tabish

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Sep 6, 2010, 2:59:42 PM9/6/10
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Pankaj ji,
You are right, Ipomoea quamoclit is called Ishq Pencha. I came to
know that in UP people also call Rangoon Creeper Ishq penchaan. But
you know, local names are like that - they vary from place to place.
The original Lavang Lata is Luvunga scandens, where the genus name
is derived from its Indian name:
http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Lavang%20Lata.html
Now that we are talking about local names, let me mention another
interesting naming confusion
Nargis is the Persian/Urdu/Hindi name of the Narcissus species
flowers:
http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Nargis.html
However, in Hyderabad, Tradescantia spathacea is known as Nargis!
http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Moses%20in%20the%20Cradle.html
- Tabish

On Sep 6, 11:12 pm, Pankaj Oudhia <pankajoud...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Tabish ji,
>
>   Many herbs are known as Isq Pencha. Ipomoea quamoclit is one of these. I
> am reading this name for Quisqualis first time. One of the local names
> of Quisqualis
> is Laung Lata <http://www.botanical.com/site/column_poudhia/177_laung.html>.
> Laung means Clove and Lata means climber. I know it from this name from my
> childhood. It is different from Bengali sweet dish Laung Lata which actually
> have clove as ingredient. Ludiwigia is also known as Laung phool due to
> floral structure looks like Clove specially Ludwigia octovalvis.
>
> Just for information.
>
> regards
>
> Pankaj Oudhia
>

Pankaj Oudhia

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Sep 6, 2010, 3:16:35 PM9/6/10
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Thanks Tabish ij for enriching my knowledge. Few months back we have seen similar thing with Parijat when Tanay made odd comments about postal departement's mistake of declaring Adansonia as Parijat but later we concluded that Adansonia is also known as Parijat in North India. Hence the department has done the right thing.

In general, we name ten to twenty names for any herb but we live in diverse country where names change in every kilometer. I feel that we must do some effort to collect the local names with explainations to make our database really useful.

Thanks Again.

regards

Pankaj Oudhia

Tabish

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Sep 6, 2010, 3:33:25 PM9/6/10
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I missed the Parijat discussion. So, let me add my bit to it. :-)
In Manipur, Rangoon Creeper is known as Parijat - a well accepted name
in books too!
In most languages it stands for Nyctanthes arbor-tristis.
At flowersofindia, we are at least trying to collect the names of
flowers in all Indian languages, not with explanation though.
- Tabish

On Sep 7, 12:16 am, Pankaj Oudhia <pankajoud...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Thanks Tabish ij for enriching my knowledge. Few months back we have seen
> similar thing with Parijat when Tanay made odd comments about postal
> departement's mistake of declaring Adansonia as Parijat but later we
> concluded that Adansonia is also known as Parijat in North India. Hence the
> department has done the right thing.
>
> In general, we name ten to twenty names for any herb but we live in diverse
> country where names change in every kilometer. I feel that we must do some
> effort to collect the local names with explainations to make our database
> really useful.
>
> Thanks Again.
>
> regards
>
> Pankaj Oudhia
>
> On Tue, Sep 7, 2010 at 12:29 AM, Tabish <tabi...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Pankaj ji,
> >   You are right, Ipomoea quamoclit is called Ishq Pencha. I came to
> > know that in UP people also call Rangoon Creeper Ishq penchaan. But
> > you know, local names are like that - they vary from place to place.
> >  The original Lavang Lata is Luvunga scandens, where the genus name
> > is derived from its Indian name:
> >  http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Lavang%20Lata.html
> > Now that we are talking about local names, let me mention another
> > interesting naming confusion
> >  Nargis is the Persian/Urdu/Hindi name of the  Narcissus species
> > flowers:
> >  http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Nargis.html
> > However, in Hyderabad, Tradescantia spathacea is known as Nargis!
>
> >http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Moses%20in%20the%20Cradl...

Pankaj Kumar

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Sep 6, 2010, 3:46:31 PM9/6/10
to Tabish, efloraofindia
See, this is the reason why a plant needs a botanical name following
Binomial Nomenclature and ICBN :). Thanks for enriching my knowledge
Tabish sir and Oudhia sir.
Regards
Pankaj

Pankaj Oudhia

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Sep 6, 2010, 3:59:02 PM9/6/10
to efloraofindia
"a botanical name" 

Agreed.

But in reality there are so many old and new botanical names of same plants, constantly changing, even hard to remember, like local names. ;)

regards

Pankaj Oudhia

Pankaj Kumar

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Sep 6, 2010, 4:03:31 PM9/6/10
to Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Yes sir, you are right, but if you look scientifically, they dont get
CHANGED, but they get CORRECTED!!

Pankaj Oudhia

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Sep 6, 2010, 4:07:21 PM9/6/10
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-And the correction is never ending process.

Agreed.

But in contrary, local names continue up to several generations with no scope of correction. ;)

regards

Pankaj Oudhia

Pankaj Oudhia

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Sep 6, 2010, 4:09:32 PM9/6/10
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Another Parijat!!!!! I am waiting for the comments of Vijayashankar ji. This new information will shock him. ;)


Thanks Tabish ji.

regards

Pankaj Oudhia

Pankaj Kumar

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Sep 6, 2010, 4:11:50 PM9/6/10
to Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Yes local names continue....both...MULTIPLE LOCAL NAMES FOR SINGLE
PLANT and SINGLE NAME FOR MULTIPLE PLANTS.....that is so unscientific,
but yes they do work good on local scale !! :))...

Pankaj Oudhia

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Sep 6, 2010, 4:19:06 PM9/6/10
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"but yes they do work good on local scale"

Not always.

Example is Neem. It is working good both in local as well as Global scale. And also Musli power not the Chlorophytum power.

Everything is scientific and non-scientific at the same point. It depends how you take it. ;) 

After studying few years we start considering us as Agriculture scientists but in fact farmers are real scientists as without any formal education they are practicing Agriculture millions times better than us.

regards

Pankaj Oudhia

Pankaj Kumar

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Sep 6, 2010, 4:25:41 PM9/6/10
to Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
This is a never ending debate...hahahhaha

Just for example,

MUSLI, which musli are you talking of, HYPOXIS, CURCULIGO,
CHLOROPHYTUM, ASPARAGUS !!! :).

For sure, I agree with you that farmers are better scientists, who had
been using their land without fertilizer and without any chemicals, at
the same time, agriculturists came up with chemicals and chemicals
:P.....

Pankaj

Pankaj Oudhia

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Sep 6, 2010, 4:31:44 PM9/6/10
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"at
the same time, agriculturists came up with chemicals and chemicals
:P....."

Let me complete this sentence


"at
the same time, agriculturists came up with chemicals and chemicals
:P..... and destroyed the Indian farming


Back to Musli.

Safed Musli is Chlorophytum, Kali Musli is Curculigo, Semal Musli is Bombax's root. But in this world white color is considered as king of colors. So Safed Musli took the top position as Musli. Black Musli i.e. Curculigo is far better in terms of medicinal properties even preferred by wild animals but due to its color it is ignored.

regards

Pankaj Oudhia

Pankaj Kumar

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Sep 6, 2010, 4:36:30 PM9/6/10
to Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
But you never said, BLACK MUSLI POWER or WHITE MULSI POWER :P....
By the way, Bombax is also a Mulsi, this is new to me.

Pankaj

Pankaj Oudhia

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Sep 6, 2010, 4:44:36 PM9/6/10
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You are right but the users know Safed Musli as Musli. Jungle people know the differences. Musli means Safed Musli.

Going for sleep as at 5 am I have to start for forest to see Bhoolan Jadi i.e. short time memory erasing herb. Although I am not in mood to try it on myself----but it is considered boon for the people who have severe mental shock in recent past.

Lets other members continue this interesting discussion.

Good night and Orchidi dreams. ;)

regards

Pankaj Oudhia

Pankaj Kumar

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Sep 6, 2010, 4:46:41 PM9/6/10
to Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Yeah in that case I need some Bhoolan Jhadi for me. I had a lot of
mental shocks since past 2 years :((...

Take care and have a nice trip.
Good night and sweet herbal dreams.

Pankaj

Gurcharan Singh

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Sep 6, 2010, 4:47:21 PM9/6/10
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Botanical names help in correct placement of a plant, but local names do help in the process. Whenever I come across a local name (this group or elsewhere), first thing I do is open my book "Useful Plants of India" CSIR, and try to find the scientific name for that plant. If I find more than one plants with the same common name, I adopt the process of elimination to reach the correct identity, and most of the times it helps.

-- 
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/ 

Shantanu Bhattacharya

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Sep 7, 2010, 1:31:34 PM9/7/10
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Hi

taken this snap of the Rangoon creeper today in my neighbourhood....

i have always been eager to know the name of this plant.

Finally i came to know its nice name from some previous discussions in this forum.

thanks...to my efloraindia-friends.

 

we call it Jhumko-lata in Bengali.

 

cheers!

Shantanu  : )

rangoon creeper.jpg

mani nair

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Sep 7, 2010, 1:48:50 PM9/7/10
to Shantanu Bhattacharya, efloraofindia
Shantanu ji, nice photo.   The flowers change their color  from white to pink and then red. It has also got a mild fragrance.   

Regards,

Mani.

Padmini Raghavan

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Sep 7, 2010, 1:56:15 PM9/7/10
to mani nair, Shantanu Bhattacharya, efloraofindia
It has a delicious fragrance and since my neighbour's plant has clambered right up her mango tree it gifts us a fantastic perfume and plenty of flowers.
Padmini Raghavan.

Shantanu Bhattacharya

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Sep 7, 2010, 2:01:24 PM9/7/10
to Padmini Raghavan, mani nair, efloraofindia
Thanks Mani ji....for the compliments and the info about the colour change...
 
Shantanu  :)

 

tanay bose

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Sep 7, 2010, 2:08:56 PM9/7/10
to Shantanu Bhattacharya, Padmini Raghavan, mani nair, efloraofindia
Nice catch shantanu da
Tanay

--
Tanay Bose
Research Assistant & Teaching Assistant
Department of Botany
University of British Columbia
3529-6270 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4 (Canada)
Phone: 778-323-4036

nabha meghani

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Sep 8, 2010, 7:07:43 AM9/8/10
to Shantanu Bhattacharya, Padmini Raghavan, mani nair, efloraofindia
Moreover the flowers are hermaphrodite.
About the change of the color, I have read somewhere that many flowers change their color after pollination to signal the pollinator, "here is no work to do, save ur energy."  I observe it on Geflecktes Lungenkraut (Pulmonaria officinalis) every year. If it is the same for Rangunschlinger, i don't know.
Regards
Nalini

gubbala ramakrishnarao

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Sep 8, 2010, 6:52:52 AM9/8/10
to tanay bose, Shantanu Bhattacharya, Padmini Raghavan, mani nair, efloraofindia
Hello,
 
It is Quisqualis indica....
 
 
GRK Rao

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