Anagallis arvensis ssp. arvensis

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Gurcharan Singh

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Jul 26, 2010, 3:01:19 AM7/26/10
to efloraofindia, Flowers of India

Have seen a lot of blue flowered Anagallis (Anagallis arvensis ssp. foemina) in Delhi, usually growing at altitudes below 1500 m or so, but was lucky to find both subspecies in Kashmir. This one is A. arvensis ssp. arvensis with orange-red flowers fairly common in Kashmir in the valley (1600 m and above), photographed in June 26, 2010 from Srinagar. 
--
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/

Anagallis-arvensis-arvensis-Kashmir-a.jpg
Anagallis-arvensis-arvensis-Kashmir-b.jpg
Anagallis-arvensis-arvensis-Kashmir-c.jpg

Prashant awale

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Jul 26, 2010, 3:03:28 AM7/26/10
to Gurcharan Singh, efloraofindia, Flowers of India
Fantastic catch Gurcharan Singh ji. Seeing this Orange var for the first time. Thanks for sharing.
regards
Prashant

 

Tabish

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Jul 26, 2010, 3:11:42 AM7/26/10
to efloraofindia
Gurcharan ji, this is beautiful! Seeing this Scarlet Pimpernel for the
first time in India.
Your unraveling of the Kashmir flora has become very exciting.
- Tabish
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Pankaj Oudhia

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Jul 26, 2010, 3:17:43 AM7/26/10
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Nice pictures Gurcharan ji. Not sure about the medicinal properties of this type as blue flowered Anagallis is very common in crop fields specially in winter season crops in my region. Anagallis is known as Poor man's (or farmer's) weather clock as its flowers close before bad weather. Again I am not sure whether your Anagallis is also having same property or not?

While walk in forest when we get injury from Tribulus or Asteracantha spines the Healers use local herbs whereas I prefer use of Anagallis as Homoeo-drug. It acts in miraculous way.

Anagallis arvensis possess benefical Allelopathic properties. I tried it on different medicinal and aromatic crops, at first in lab and then in fields, and now my farmers are using it.

Accprding to weed researchers it is a curse but for the farmers aware of its healing properties it is boon. This is the reason in general they ignore research recommnedations specially in the field of weed management.

regards

Pankaj Oudhia 

Tabish

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Jul 26, 2010, 3:34:06 AM7/26/10
to efloraofindia
The Blue Pimpernel and the Scarlet Pimpernel both are often called
shepherd's weather glass or shepherd's clock because the flowers close
before sunset or if it is about to rain. These brightly colored
flowers appear as bright dots in the field, which dramatically
"disappear" when the flowers close, if the sky is overcast or the sun
is about to set. Closed flowers are quite hard to notice because of
their dull color.
- Tabish

On Jul 26, 12:17 pm, Pankaj Oudhia <pankajoud...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Nice pictures Gurcharan ji. Not sure about the medicinal properties of this
> type as blue flowered Anagallis is very common in crop fields specially in
> winter season crops in my region. Anagallis is known as Poor man's (or
> farmer's) weather clock as its flowers close before bad weather. Again I am
> not sure whether your Anagallis is also having same property or not?
>
> While walk in forest when we get injury from Tribulus or Asteracantha spines
> the Healers use local herbs whereas I prefer use of Anagallis as
> Homoeo-drug. It acts in miraculous way.
>
> Anagallis arvensis possess benefical Allelopathic properties. I tried it on
> different medicinal and aromatic crops, at first in lab and then in fields,
> and now my farmers are using it.
>
> Accprding to weed researchers it is a curse but for the farmers aware of its
> healing properties it is boon. This is the reason in general they ignore
> research recommnedations specially in the field of weed management.
>
> regards
>
> Pankaj Oudhia
>
> On Mon, Jul 26, 2010 at 12:31 PM, Gurcharan Singh <singh...@gmail.com>wrote:
>
>
>
> > Have seen a lot of blue flowered Anagallis (Anagallis arvensis ssp.
> > foemina) in Delhi, usually growing at altitudes below 1500 m or so, but was
> > lucky to find both subspecies in Kashmir. This one is A. arvensis ssp.
> > arvensis with orange-red flowers fairly common in Kashmir in the valley
> > (1600 m and above), photographed in June 26, 2010 from Srinagar.
> > --
> > Dr. Gurcharan Singh
> > Retired  Associate Professor
> > SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
> > Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
> > Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
> >http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/<http://people.du.ac.in/%7Esinghg45/>

Gurcharan Singh

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Jul 26, 2010, 3:51:38 AM7/26/10
to Tabish, efloraofindia
Thanks Prashant ji, Tabish ji and Pankaj ji for encouraging comments.


-- 
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/ 


nabha meghani

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Jul 26, 2010, 7:05:31 AM7/26/10
to Gurcharan Singh, Tabish, efloraofindia
Thank you Gurcharan ji,
for sharing these beautiful fotos.
These flowers are quite common here and I don't take notice of them. After watching your fotos I think I must always carry my fotoapparat with me, whenever I go out, even to the grocer for shopping.
Ther germanname of the plant is Gaukheil (heeling mentalproblems) and was used to treat melancholie. Wetterkraut (weatherindicator) or Nebelpflanze (fogplant) are other names.
I read in my book that in india the plant is used by fishers to catch fish because it is light toxic.
Regards
Nalini
 
 
----- Original Message -----

Pankaj Oudhia

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Jul 26, 2010, 7:23:40 AM7/26/10
to efloraofindia
Let me continue the interesting discussion.

In wheat fields in India, Anagallis grows with Chenopodium, Melilotus and Sphaeranthus. As fish poison, the use of Sphaeranthus is preferred. In order to increase its performance Anagallis, collected before flowering, is added. To make it more strong remaining two species are added.

Anagallis is toxic plant. In order to nullify its harmful effects it is used with Chenopodium. The harmful effects of Melilotus commonly known as Senji is nullified by Sphaeranthus.   All these species are used with Wheat grass in different combinations.

The presence of these fives in wheat fields have special purpose. Mother Nature arranged it for welfare of humanbeings. The greedy humanbeings see only wheat as crop and destroy other gifts as weed and in this way loose the golden oppurtuniy to get benefit from it.

regards

Pankaj Oudhia  

tanay bose

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Jul 26, 2010, 7:35:08 AM7/26/10
to Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Nice catch of the plant sir ji !!!
Tanay
--
Tanay Bose
+91(033) 25550676 (Resi)
9830439691(Mobile)


Gurcharan Singh

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Jul 26, 2010, 9:09:47 AM7/26/10
to tanay bose, Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Dear friends
It feels good to read interesting discussion with useful feedback from experts from different fields. Nalini ji, the Flora of Kashmir has so many common elements with Europe, and when in Kashmir I would use Book on British Flora, Flora Europaea and Flora of British Isles commonly for identification. Pankaj ji, it feels so refreshing to read your useful information about plant healers. 
    I saw this plant in Kashmir so many times, little knowing that it will generate so much interest on the group. Thanks everybody.


-- 
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/ 

R. Vijayasankar

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Jul 26, 2010, 10:08:31 AM7/26/10
to Gurcharan Singh, tanay bose, Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Interesting and useful info Pankaj ji and Tabish ji. Thanks Gurcharan ji for initiating the discussion by posting excellent pictures of Anagallis.

With regards

Vijayasankar


Pankaj Oudhia

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Jul 26, 2010, 10:33:38 AM7/26/10
to efloraofindia
Tabish ji,

   In a book by Bailey J.H.,  Anagallis is mentioned as Poor man's weather glass. You have mentioned it as Shepherd's weather glass. Just curious to know that when this poor man has been recognized as Shepherd? Any idea?  ;)

Bailey L.H. 1960. Manual of cultivated plants, Macmillan, New York.

regards

Pankaj Oudhia

nabha meghani

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Jul 26, 2010, 5:06:03 PM7/26/10
to Gurcharan Singh, Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Yes, Prof. Singh ji,
it struck me, when I read the subject line about your postings of Kashmir Flora.
Do these plants have indian names?

Gurcharan Singh

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Jul 26, 2010, 11:52:43 PM7/26/10
to nabha meghani, Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Yes Nalini ji
Many do have. Here are some for Anagallis arvensis ssp. arvensis
Hindi: Jonkmari
Guj: Anagallide, morgellina
Punjab: Dhabbar


-- 
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/ 

Pankaj Oudhia

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Jul 27, 2010, 12:58:27 AM7/27/10
to efloraofindia
Blue Anagallis is known as Krishnneel also. कृष्णनील

regards

Pankaj Oudhia
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