[efloraofindia:34984] Corymbia citriodora from Delhi

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Gurcharan Singh

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May 17, 2010, 1:40:40 AM5/17/10
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Corymbia citriodora (Hook.) K. D. Hill. & L. A. S. Johnson (syn: Eucalyptus citriodora Hook.) from Delhi University, grown along the campus roads. Characterised by smooth trunk, bark flaking in sheets, leaves narrow and long, strongly odorous; flower buds in groups of 2-5, hemispherical, caps two, upper green, lower reddish, fruit cup-like.  

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Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/

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Eucalyptus-citriodora-Delhi-1.jpg
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Eucalyptus-citriodora-Delhi-5.jpg

tanay bose

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May 17, 2010, 6:34:04 AM5/17/10
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Really nice photo ....!! Sir Ji thanks for sharing
tanay

On Mon, May 17, 2010 at 11:10 AM, Gurcharan Singh <sing...@gmail.com> wrote:
Corymbia citriodora (Hook.) K. D. Hill. & L. A. S. Johnson (syn: Eucalyptus citriodora Hook.) from Delhi University, grown along the campus roads. Characterised by smooth trunk, bark flaking in sheets, leaves narrow and long, strongly odorous; flower buds in groups of 2-5, hemispherical, caps two, upper green, lower reddish, fruit cup-like.  

--
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/




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Tanay Bose
+91(033) 25550676 (Resi)
9830439691(Mobile)
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Kenneth Greby

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May 17, 2010, 6:43:43 AM5/17/10
to tanay bose, bodhi-n...@googlegroups.com, efloraofindia, Flowers of India
One of my favorite trees. It is very common in Southern California, USA, though it has been attacked in the last ten years by a recently (accidentally) psyllid from its native Australia. And though it would grow in South Florida's climate, this tree, sadly, cannot tolerate its limestone soils.

Regards--
Ken.



From: tanay bose <tanay...@gmail.com>
To: bodhi-n...@googlegroups.com
Cc: efloraofindia <indian...@googlegroups.com>; Flowers of India <flowers...@gmail.com>
Sent: Mon, May 17, 2010 3:34:04 AM
Subject: [efloraofindia:35013] Re: Corymbia citriodora from Delhi

tanay bose

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May 17, 2010, 6:52:13 AM5/17/10
to Kenneth Greby, bodhi-n...@googlegroups.com, efloraofindia, Flowers of India
Dear Kenneth ,
This link will provide you with a compact knowledge about the Psyllids of California  http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7423.html.
regards
Tanay

Kenneth Greby

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May 17, 2010, 7:23:36 AM5/17/10
to tanay bose, bodhi-n...@googlegroups.com, efloraofindia, Flowers of India
Thank you Tanay.

For many years, Eucalyptus and Corymbia species grew totally pest-free in the US since importation was done entirely by seed. However, with the advent of increased trade and air travel, pests have hitched rides. Without the presence of natural enemies in the US,  relatively minor pests, especially the red gum lerp psyllid, have devastated local tree stands.

Perhaps these conditions and pest problems are not confined to the US as well.

Regards--
Ken.


From: tanay bose <tanay...@gmail.com>
To: Kenneth Greby <fst...@yahoo.com>
Cc: bodhi-n...@googlegroups.com; efloraofindia <indian...@googlegroups.com>; Flowers of India <flowers...@gmail.com>
Sent: Mon, May 17, 2010 3:52:13 AM
Subject: Re: [efloraofindia:35015] Re: Corymbia citriodora from Delhi

tanay bose

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May 17, 2010, 9:44:24 AM5/17/10
to Kenneth Greby, bodhi-n...@googlegroups.com, efloraofindia, Flowers of India
Ken ,
As far as i know red Ladybird Beetles are natural enemy of these Psyllids, as well as its a chemical free great bio control method why dont your Govt. rear ladybird beetles and set them free in the areas where psyllids are destroying plant ?? I am quit sure with this your pest problem will be solved like in cases of many other countries in Europe.
Regards
Tanay

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