Ambadi

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Pravin Kawale

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Sep 26, 2008, 10:15:42 AM9/26/08
to indiantreepix
Hi,
Flower of Ambadi ( local marathi name)
Thanks

--
Pravin
Ambadi (Large).JPG

nabha meghani

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Sep 26, 2008, 10:26:50 AM9/26/08
to Pravin Kawale, indiantreepix
Hallo,
beautiful picture, thanks for sharing.
Is this that ambadi used as palebhaji?
Regards
Nalini


Mahadeswara Swamy

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Sep 27, 2008, 12:55:43 AM9/27/08
to Pravin Kawale, indiantreepix
Looks like Hibiscus sabdariffa , a fibre yielding plant.  Leaves are used for chutney in Andhra (Gongura).

----- Original Message ----
From: Pravin Kawale <kawale...@gmail.com>
To: indiantreepix <indian...@googlegroups.com>
Sent: Friday, 26 September, 2008 7:45:42 PM
Subject: [indiantreepix:5055] Ambadi

Hi,
Flower of Ambadi ( local marathi name)
Thanks

--
Pravin


J.M. Garg

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Sep 27, 2008, 7:19:39 AM9/27/08
to Mahadeswara Swamy, Pravin Kawale, indiantreepix
Here is a picture of Hibiscus sabdariffa similar to one posted by Pravin ji at: http://www.bullockcreeknursery.com.au/hibiscus-sabda.htm

Here are some interesting extracts from Wikipedia link:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roselle_(plant)

The Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) is a species of hibiscus native to the Old World tropics. It is an annual or perennial herb or woody-based subshrub, growing to 2–2.5 m tall. The leaves are deeply three- to five-lobed, 8–15 cm long, arranged alternately on the stems.

The flowers are 8–10 cm in diameter, white to pale yellow with a dark red spot at the base of each petal, and have a stout fleshy calyx at the base, 1.5–2 cm wide, enlarging to 3–3.5 cm, fleshy and bright red as the fruit matures. It is an annual plant, and takes about six months to mature.

The plant is considered to have antihypertensive properties. Primarily, the plant is cultivated for the production for bast fibre from the stem of the plant. The fibre may be used as a substitute for jute in making burlap [1]. Hibiscus, specifically Roselle, has been used in folk medicine as a diuretic, mild laxative, and treatment for cardiac and nerve diseases and cancer. [2]

The red calyces of the plant are increasingly exported to America and Europe, where they are used as food colourings. Germany is the main importer. It can also be found in markets (as flowers or syrup) in some places such as France, where there are Senegalese immigrant communities. The green leaves are used like a spicy version of spinach. They give flavour to the Senegalese fish and rice dish thiéboudieune. Proper records are not kept, but the Senegalese government estimates national production and consumption at 700 metric tons per year. Also in Myanmar their green leaves are the main ingredient in making chin baung kyaw curry.

In East Africa, the calyx infusion, called "Sudan tea", is taken to relieve coughs. Roselle juice, with salt, pepper, asafetida and molasses, is taken as a remedy for biliousness.

The heated leaves are applied to cracks in the feet and on boils and ulcers to speed maturation. A lotion made from leaves is used on sores and wounds. The seeds are said to be diuretic and tonic in action and the brownish-yellow seed oil is claimed to heal sores on camels. In India, a decoction of the seeds is given to relieve dysuria, strangury and mild cases of dyspepsia. Brazilians attribute stomachic, emollient and resolutive properties to the bitter roots.[3]



For learning about our trees & plants, please visit/ join Google e-group (Indiantreepix) http://groups.google.co.in/group/indiantreepix?hl=en

Madhuri Pejaver

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Sep 27, 2008, 8:26:39 AM9/27/08
to J.M. Garg, indian...@googlegroups.com
if it is the same as ambadi the leaves are used for a delicious vegetable, they are khatta. the calyx of floer mentioned remain persistant with fruit which is also khatta used in curry as the substitute for tamerind. can be dried and stored
madhuri


--- On Sat, 9/27/08, J.M. Garg <jmg...@gmail.com> wrote:

> From: J.M. Garg <jmg...@gmail.com>
> Subject: [indiantreepix:5099] Re: Ambadi
> To: "Mahadeswara Swamy" <swamy...@yahoo.com>
> Cc: "Pravin Kawale" <kawale...@gmail.com>, "indiantreepix" <indian...@googlegroups.com>
> Date: Saturday, September 27, 2008, 4:49 PM
> Here is a picture of Hibiscus sabdariffa similar to one
> posted by Pravin ji
> at:
> http://www.bullockcreeknursery.com.au/hibiscus-sabda.htm
>
> Here are some interesting extracts from Wikipedia link:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roselle_(plant)
>
> The *Roselle* (*Hibiscus sabdariffa*) is a species of
> hibiscus<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hibiscus>native
> to the Old
> World <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_World>
> tropics. It is an annual or
> perennial herb <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herb> or
> woody-based
> subshrub<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subshrub>,
> growing to 2–2.5 m tall. The leaves
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaf> are
> deeply three- to five-lobed, 8–15 cm long, arranged
> alternately on the
> stems.
>
> The flowers <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flower> are
> 8–10 cm in diameter,
> white to pale yellow with a dark red spot at the base of
> each petal, and
> have a stout fleshy calyx
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calyx_(flower)> at
> the base, 1.5–2 cm wide, enlarging to 3–3.5 cm, fleshy
> and bright red as the
> fruit <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fruit> matures.
> It is an annual plant,
> and takes about six months to mature.
>
> The plant is considered to have
> antihypertensive<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antihypertensive>properties.
> Primarily, the plant is cultivated for the production for
> bast
> fibre <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bast_fibre> from
> the stem of the plant.
> The fibre may be used as a substitute for
> jute<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jute>in making
> burlap <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burlap>
> [1]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roselle_(plant)#cite_note-www_hort_purdue_edu1-0>.
> Hibiscus <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hibiscus>,
> specifically Roselle, has
> been used in folk medicine as a diuretic, mild
> laxative<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laxative>,
> and treatment for cardiac and nerve diseases and
> cancer<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cancer>.
> [2]
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roselle_(plant)#cite_note-www_drugs_com-1>
>
> The red calyces <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sepal>
> of the plant are
> increasingly exported
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Export> to
> America<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States>and
> Europe <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europe>, where
> they are used as food
> colourings
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_colouring>.
> Germany<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germany>is the
> main importer. It
> can also be found in markets (as flowers or
> syrup <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrup>) in some
> places such as
> France<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/France>,
> where there are Senegalese immigrant communities. The green
> leaves<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaf>are used
> like a spicy version
> of
> spinach <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spinach>. They
> give flavour to the
> Senegalese fish and rice dish
> *thiéboudieune<http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Thi%C3%A9boudieune&action=edit&redlink=1>
> *. Proper records are not kept, but the Senegalese
> government estimates
> national production and consumption at 700 metric
> tons<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metric_ton>per
> year. Also in
> Myanmar <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myanmar> their
> green leaves are the
> main ingredient in making chin baung kyaw curry.
>
> In East Africa, the calyx infusion, called "Sudan
> tea", is taken to relieve
> coughs. Roselle juice, with salt, pepper, asafetida and
> molasses, is taken
> as a remedy for biliousness
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biliousness>.
>
> The heated leaves are applied to cracks in the feet and on
> boils and ulcers
> to speed maturation. A lotion made from leaves is used on
> sores and wounds.
> The seeds are said to be diuretic and tonic in action and
> the
> brownish-yellow seed oil is claimed to heal sores on
> camels<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camels>.
> In India, a decoction of the seeds is given to relieve
> dysuria<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dysuria>,
> strangury <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strangury>
> and mild cases of
> dyspepsia <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyspepsia>.
> Brazilians attribute
> stomachic, emollient and resolutive properties to the
> bitter
> roots.[3]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roselle_(plant)#cite_note-2>
>
> On Sat, Sep 27, 2008 at 10:25 AM, Mahadeswara Swamy
> <swamy...@yahoo.com>wrote:
>
> > Looks like Hibiscus sabdariffa , a fibre yielding
> plant. Leaves are used
> > for chutney in Andhra (Gongura).
> >
> > ----- Original Message ----
> > From: Pravin Kawale <kawale...@gmail.com>
> > To: indiantreepix
> <indian...@googlegroups.com>
> > Sent: Friday, 26 September, 2008 7:45:42 PM
> > Subject: [indiantreepix:5055] Ambadi
> >
> > Hi,
> > Flower of Ambadi ( local marathi name)
> > Thanks
> >
> > --
> > Pravin
> >
> >
> >
> > ------------------------------
> > Get an email ID as your...@ymail.com or
> your...@rocketmail.com. Click
> >
> here.<http://in.rd.yahoo.com/tagline_dbid_4/*http://in.promos.yahoo.com/address>
> > >
> >
>
>
> --
> With regards,
> J.M.Garg
> "We often ignore the beauty around us"
> Creating Awareness about Indian Flora & Fauna:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Jmgarg1

sibda...@gmail.com

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Sep 27, 2008, 1:37:30 PM9/27/08
to indiantreepix
It is also known as Jamaican sorrel, as the plant is native to W.
Indies. The fibre in bengali known as Mes-ta,
persistent calyces contain acids and pectin, used in jellies, chutney
etc. Leaves are eaten as vegetables (sour of course)

On Sep 27, 5:26 pm, Madhuri Pejaver <formpeja...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> if it is the same as ambadi the leaves are used for a delicious vegetable, they are khatta. the calyx of floer mentioned remain persistant with fruit which is also khatta used in curry as the substitute for tamerind. can be dried and stored
> madhuri
>
> --- On Sat, 9/27/08, J.M. Garg <jmga...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > [1]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roselle_(plant)#cite_note-www_hort_purdu...>.
> > *thiéboudieune<http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Thi%C3%A9boudieune&action=e...>
> > <swamy_c...@yahoo.com>wrote:
>
> > >  Looks like Hibiscus sabdariffa , a fibre yielding
> > plant.  Leaves are used
> > > for chutney in Andhra (Gongura).
>
> > > ----- Original Message ----
> > > From: Pravin Kawale <kawale.pra...@gmail.com>
> > > To: indiantreepix
> > <indian...@googlegroups.com>
> > > Sent: Friday, 26 September, 2008 7:45:42 PM
> > > Subject: [indiantreepix:5055] Ambadi
>
> > >  Hi,
> > > Flower of Ambadi ( local marathi name)
> > > Thanks
>
> > > --
> > > Pravin
>
> > > ------------------------------
> > > Get an email ID as yourn...@ymail.com or
> > yourn...@rocketmail.com. Click
>
> > here.<http://in.rd.yahoo.com/tagline_dbid_4/*http://in.promos.yahoo.com/add...>
>
> > --
> > With regards,
> > J.M.Garg
> > "We often ignore the beauty around us"
> > Creating Awareness about Indian Flora & Fauna:
> >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Jmgarg1
> > For learning about our trees & plants, please visit/
> > join Google e-group
> > (Indiantreepix)
> >http://groups.google.co.in/group/indiantreepix?hl=en- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

J.M. Garg

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Sep 30, 2008, 9:56:06 PM9/30/08
to sibda...@gmail.com, indiantreepix
Further reply from Sibdas ji:
"Hibiscus sabdariiffa is called Jamaican Sorrel, earlier I had mistaken
it as native of W.Indies. Now from literature I find it is native to
Malayasia and India, African slaves introduced them to Jamaica, from
there they were further introduced to Florida and the USA, hence  got
then ame Jamaican Sorrel. It has two main sub-species, H.sabdariffa
var. sabdariffa- mainly cultivated for Calyces, used in Jam , as
"Sudan Tea" {good for cough), as colouring substance and for various
medicinal properties (reducing blood sugar and blood pressure). The
other sub-species H.sabdariffa  var. altissima  yeilds better fibre,
white and silky, often used as Jute substitute."

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