Bamboo like vine

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Samir Takaochi

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Oct 27, 2008, 10:00:43 PM10/27/08
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Hello. Could someone advice me for ID?

Place: Dharuhera, Haryana
Length of leaf: 25cm
全体.JPG
葉と蔓のようす.JPG
蔓の表面.JPG

Yazdy Palia

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Oct 28, 2008, 12:30:19 AM10/28/08
to Samir Takaochi, indiantreepix
Though I am not a botanist and do not know the name of this climber,
It appears to be a parasite that will eventually kill the tree on
which it is climbing. It appears to be like one of the deadliest
parasite on trees. I would like to know the name of this parasite too.
Regards
Yazdy Palia.

Anand Kumar Bhatt

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Oct 28, 2008, 1:32:12 AM10/28/08
to Samir Takaochi, indiantreepix
As it is green it cannot be a parasite. to me it looks like a scindasus sp. However let the expert opine. there are seeral creepers like that e.g. monstera, epipremnumwhich cllimb on the trees like that.
akbhatt

On Tue, Oct 28, 2008 at 7:30 AM, Samir Takaochi <band...@gmail.com> wrote:

Mahadeswara Swamy

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Oct 28, 2008, 7:12:55 AM10/28/08
to Samir Takaochi, indiantreepix
Looks like Syngonium auritum  .   These plants are similar to Philodendrons in nature. Generally trained on trees.
Dr.Mahadeswara swamy


From: Samir Takaochi <band...@gmail.com>
To: indiantreepix <indian...@googlegroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, 28 October, 2008 7:30:43 AM
Subject: [indiantreepix:5574] Bamboo like vine

Hello. Could someone advice me for ID?

Place: Dharuhera, Haryana
Length of leaf: 25cm




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Samir Takaochi

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Oct 29, 2008, 5:43:32 AM10/29/08
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Yazdy, Dr. Swamy, Anand, thank you very much for your reply. I have checked by Syngonium auritum but leaflet is divided into five, I added more large picture of leaves.
 
  
全体.JPG
葉と蔓のようす.JPG
蔓の表面.JPG
葉.JPG

Samir Takaochi

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Oct 29, 2008, 5:44:41 AM10/29/08
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Sorry I attached wrong photo of leaves. I send it again
 


 
全体.JPG
葉と蔓のようす.JPG
蔓の表面.JPG
葉.JPG

Yazdy Palia

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Oct 30, 2008, 1:45:27 AM10/30/08
to Samir Takaochi, indiantreepix
Once again, am not a botanist and would not know the name, however,
the observation of Mr. Anand that since the leaves are green, it could
not be a parasite is incorrect. I am a coffee farmer living at the
edge of a forest and have seen at least three types of parasites and
all of them have green leaves. I have seen them destroy large trees
totally.
One of them grows only on the branches and the seeds are deposited
there mostly by sunbirds who eat the fruits and drop the seeds that
have a mucilage around its seeds enough to let the seeds sprout on the
branches of trees and take root there. Its flowers are white, the
fruits are around 1/2 inch long and red in colour and the leaves are
green throughout its life.
The second type of parasite that I have seen strangulate the mother
tree on which it grows and ultimately occupy the space of the mother
tree. The third kind is the one in this picture, the leaves are the
same as in the picture and the roots almost smother the mother tree on
which it first of all climbs.
Regards
Yazdy Palia.

Anand Kumar Bhatt

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Oct 30, 2008, 3:12:59 AM10/30/08
to Yazdy Palia, Samir Takaochi, indiantreepix
Again this is for the experts to tell us. But I thought that parasites do not prepare their food and therefore they don't need the green that is chlorophyll. I have read botany upto 10th class and that also in the year of the Lord 1955-56 which is more thaan half a century ago, and naturally at that time what we read was very basic, what our children study now is much more advanced. What I remember from those days is that some plants grow initially on other trees when its seeds are germinated there, and later the guest tree chokes and kills the host tree. Ficus bengalensis and ficus religiosa esp. are such plants. They are called Epiphytes. It was on theat basis that I had statd that the syngonium (?) on the host tree is not parasite. But I am ready for correction.
Best wishes,
akbhatt

J.M. Garg

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Oct 30, 2008, 10:14:30 PM10/30/08
to Anand Kumar Bhatt, Yazdy Palia, Samir Takaochi, indiantreepix

Here are some extracts from Wikipedia link on Epiphytes:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epiphyte

Epiphytic plants use photosynthesis for energy and (where non-aquatic) obtain moisture from the air or from dampness (rain and cloud moisture) on the surface of their hosts. Roots may develop primarily for attachment, and specialized structures (for example, cups and scales) may be used to collect or hold moisture.

Epiphytic plants attached to their hosts high in the canopy have an advantage over herbs restricted to the ground where there is less light and herbivores may be more active.

Epiphytic plants are also important to certain animals that may live in their water reservoirs, such as some types of frogs and arthropods. The best-known epiphytic plants include mosses, orchids, and bromeliads such as Spanish moss (of the genus Tillandsia), but epiphytic plants may be found in every major group of the plant kingdom. Assemblages of large epiphytes occur most abundantly in moist tropical forests, but mosses and lichens occur as epiphytes in almost any environment with trees.

Some epiphytic plants are large trees that begin their lives high in the forest canopy. Over decades they send roots down the trunk of a host tree eventually overpowering and replacing it. The strangler fig and the northern rātā (Metrosideros spp.) of New Zealand are examples of this. Epiphytes that end up as free standing trees are also called hemiepiphytes.

Here are extracts from Wikipedia link on Syngonium:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syngonium

Syngonium is a genus of 33 species of flowering plants in the family Araceae, native to tropical rain forests in Central and South America. They are woody vines growing to heights of 10-20 m or more in trees. They have leaves that change shape according to the plant's stage of growth, and adult leaf forms are often much more lobed than the juvenile forms usually seen on small house plants.

Syngonium species are often grown as house plants, usually only in the juvenile foliage stages. For successful growth, a winter minimum temperature 16 °C to 18 °C must be maintained, rising to 20 °C to 30 °C during the growing season. They require high humidity, including misting the leaves regularly, and good light, but not direct sunlight; they will tolerate low light levels. Water freely from spring to autumn, sparingly in winter. Feed regularly in spring and summer. If juvenile foliage is preferred, cut off all the climbing stems that develop -- the plant will remain bushy, rather than climb, and the leaves will be more arrow-shaped. Repot every second spring. Propagation is by cuttings or air layering.

Syngonium podophyllum is the most commonly cultivated species, being used as a houseplant since the late 19th century. It was originally confused with the similar-looking African genus Nephthytis, and this is still used as a common name for the plant. It was given its own genus in 1879.[1] Other names include:

  • Arrowhead plant
  • Arrowhead vine
  • Arrowhead Philodendron
  • Goosefoot
  • Trileaf Wonder
  • African evergreen[2]

There are several variegated cultivars, the main differences being in the position and extent of the cream or white markings. Some leaves are almost entirely white, pink or yellow. All parts of the plant are poisonous and cause severe mouth pain if eaten.[3]

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Yazdy Palia

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Oct 31, 2008, 12:02:08 AM10/31/08
to J.M. Garg, Anand Kumar Bhatt, Samir Takaochi, indiantreepix
Thank you Mr. Garg,
Thanks for sharing your knowledge.
Regards
Yazdy Palia.

2008/10/31 J.M. Garg <jmg...@gmail.com>:

> --
> With regards,
> J.M.Garg
> "We often ignore the beauty around us"

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