ID of the plant

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Yazdy Palia

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12-Jul-2010, 1:05:31 pm12/07/10
to indiantreepix
hello friends, what is the identity of the plant and what is the
identity of the fluffy matter on its stem.
Regrds
Yazdy.

You have been sent 5 pictures.


DSCN3118.JPG
DSCN3119.JPG
DSCN3120.JPG
DSCN3121.JPG
DSCN3122.JPG

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DSCN3118.JPG
DSCN3119.JPG
DSCN3120.JPG
DSCN3121.JPG
DSCN3122.JPG

Neil Soares

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12-Jul-2010, 1:32:03 pm12/07/10
to indiantreepix, Yazdy Palia
Hi Mr.Palia,
  My guess would be Urena lobata var.sinuata and the 'fluffy matter' are mealy bugs.
                       With regards,
                         Neil Soares.

--- On Mon, 7/12/10, Yazdy Palia <yazdy...@gmail.com> wrote:

Yazdy Palia

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12-Jul-2010, 1:38:10 pm12/07/10
to Neil Soares, indiantreepix
Hi Mr. Neil Soares,
Many thanks for the identification. It does not look like mealy bugs because there was no presence of ants on the plant. Moreover, if the mealy bugs multiply to this extent there are traces of honeydew and fungi formning on the plant.
However I will have  a look once again tomorrow and see if there is any change. The second reason why I doubt mealy bugs is because the fibres are flying about when we shake the plant.
Regards
Yazdy.

tanay bose

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12-Jul-2010, 2:45:17 pm12/07/10
to Yazdy Palia, Neil Soares, indiantreepix
Some kind of fungal mycelium but can't say the name !!
Tanay
--
Tanay Bose
+91(033) 25550676 (Resi)
9830439691(Mobile)


tanay bose

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13-Jul-2010, 2:16:53 pm13/07/10
to Yazdy Palia, Neil Soares, indiantreepix
Thsi is fungal mycelium of some soil born saprobe.
If you can kindly share some picture of the dust like things you said you saw
Can be Sclerotium!!
tanay

On Tue, Jul 13, 2010 at 9:53 PM, Yazdy Palia <yazdy...@gmail.com> wrote:
Dear Mr. Tanay ji
I had a second look, I find that just below the fluffy part, you find tiny specs of dust like particles, could they be the spores?
Regards
Yazdy.

Pankaj Oudhia

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13-Jul-2010, 2:27:01 pm13/07/10
to efloraofindia
I agree with Neil ji. It looks like Mealy bug specially in picture 3122.

regards

Pankaj Oudhia

On Mon, Jul 12, 2010 at 11:02 PM, Neil Soares <drneil...@yahoo.com> wrote:

Yazdy Palia

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13-Jul-2010, 2:33:16 pm13/07/10
to Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Dear Pankaj ji,
When there are mealy bugs, there should be plenty of ants. Moreover, mealy bugs appear in very dry areas and during summer. They can not survive our monsoon. Even if there is slight moisture in the soil, they do not thrive. mealy bugs have a fleshy body this thing does not. Moreover the fluffy matter is flying about in the air. If it is mealy bugs it can not fly about like that.
Regards
Yazdy.

Pankaj Oudhia

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13-Jul-2010, 2:42:49 pm13/07/10
to efloraofindia
Agree with you as you are seeing the plant.

Mealy bugs are still present in my garden in Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Ixora and Mango. Ants are common in first two species but in Mango I have not observed ant population. Monsoon is on in Chhattisgarh.

regards

Pankaj Oudhia

Neil Soares

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13-Jul-2010, 3:09:10 pm13/07/10
to efloraofindia, Pankaj Oudhia
Hi,
 My photographs of Mealy Bugs taken at the Nameri Tiger Reserve. Doesn't necessarily have to be ants around. These ones also jumped around a lot.
                     Regards,
                       Neil Soares.

--- On Wed, 7/14/10, Pankaj Oudhia <pankaj...@gmail.com> wrote:
Mealy Bugs 1.jpg
Mealy Bugs 2.jpg
Mealy Bugs 3.jpg
Mealy Bugs 4.jpg
Mealy Bugs 5.jpg

Dinesh Valke

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13-Jul-2010, 11:06:35 pm13/07/10
to Neil Soares, efloraofindia, Pankaj Oudhia
Many thanks Yazdi ji, Pankaj ji, Neil ji, for shedding light on these mealy bugs.
Never thought that fungus and bugs look similar.

Regards.

Yazdy Palia

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14-Jul-2010, 12:33:03 am14/07/10
to Neil Soares, efloraofindia, Pankaj Oudhia
Dear Mr. Neil Soares
Your pictures are very interesting. These are not mealy bugs but their predators. They look exactly like mealy bugs but are mobile. They are a very good sign. They will keep the population of mealy bugs down. I have forgotten the name but will try to locate the source and get back to you.
I was also under the impression that these are mealy bugs and discussed the matter with a friend in the Coffee board that I have mealy bugs that are mobile. It was then that he enlightened me that these mobile fluffy insects are actually predators of mealy bugs. He gave me its name then, however, I have forgotten it right now. I did call him on receipt of this mail but he is now retired and is having problems with his eyes. He has also forgotten the name but has promised to get back to me as soon as he remembers it. I will try to get information on this insect and revert back.
Regards
Yazdy Palia.

On Wed, Jul 14, 2010 at 12:39 AM, Neil Soares <drneil...@yahoo.com> wrote:

Yazdy Palia

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14-Jul-2010, 12:36:43 am14/07/10
to Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Dear Mr. Pankaj Oudhia ji
Many thanks for the information. The explanation is given in  my reply to Mr. Neil Soares ji. The ones without ants are not mealy bugs but its predators. They are normally mobile and move pretty fast. The same was explained to me by a friend working in Coffee board a few years back. I have forgotten the name but will try to locate information on it and revert back.
Regards
Yazdy.

Pankaj Oudhia

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14-Jul-2010, 1:33:43 am14/07/10
to efloraofindia
Will wait for this new information. In general mealy bugs are predated by Lady Bird beetles. In commercial cultivation of medicinal and aromatic crops I suggest my farmers to increase the population of this beetle.

I have tried to search the new information given by you through Google but failed to get.

regards

Pankaj Oudhia

Yazdy Palia

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14-Jul-2010, 2:17:56 am14/07/10
to Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Dear Pankaj ji,
Lady bird beatles as I understand predate on the eggs of mealy bugs thereby bringing the population under control. In my place I have noticed plenty of lady bird activity naturally. I have also noticed that if you grow plenty of trees, and attract birds. Plenty of birds like red whiskered bullbull, tailor birds, even some sunbirds predate on them. We have to be as close to nature as possible and things are automatically taken care of. When we become too greedy and do not spare any land for trees, we get into all these problems.
Regards
Yazdy.

Pankaj Oudhia

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14-Jul-2010, 2:32:14 am14/07/10
to efloraofindia
You are right Yazdi ji but the case of my farmers is different. Their fields are surrounded by other fields where modern crops are grown with heavy use of modern agrochemicals. Due to continuous application of these chemicals the pest population migartes to herb grower's fields.

 We have no option except to use Traditional Agricutlrual Knowledge to manage it. In the cultivation of medicinal crops the use of botanicals have much restrictions. For example when we use Neem based formulations in Safed Musli it manages the pest but affects the medicinal properties. (Although the Agricutlrual universities recommend the use of Neem based prodcuts for Musli as they are concerned with quantity i.e. production, not the quality for which medicinal crops are grown.) Neem based formulations work effectviely in case of Stevia without affecting its quality much.


regards

Pankaj Oudhia

Rashida Atthar

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14-Jul-2010, 10:24:52 am14/07/10
to Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Very nice discussion, I have learned some new aspects of the complex reality of the nature verses modern agriculture.

regards,
Rashida.

Gurcharan Singh

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14-Jul-2010, 10:56:54 am14/07/10
to Rashida Atthar, Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Yes Rashida ji
Very pleasing to see people from different background/profession interaction in such an involved way.
The group has a great future.

-- 
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/ 

Yazdy Palia

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14-Jul-2010, 1:26:38 pm14/07/10
to Rashida Atthar, Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Dear Rashida ji,
Thanks for the kind words. I learnt the hard way that interfering with nature is counterproductive. We could avoid so many problems if only we assist nature.
Regards
Yazdy.

On Wed, Jul 14, 2010 at 7:54 PM, Rashida Atthar <atthar....@gmail.com> wrote:

Yazdy Palia

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14-Jul-2010, 1:50:57 pm14/07/10
to Gurcharan Singh, Rashida Atthar, Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Dear Dr. Gurcharan Singh Ji,
Many thanks. We owe a lot of this civility to you.
Thanks once again.
Regards
Yazdy.

Yazdy Palia

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14-Jul-2010, 2:19:05 pm14/07/10
to Neil Soares, efloraofindia, Pankaj Oudhia
Dear Neil Ji,
Further to our discussion this morning, I have done some research and have come across the link given below. It says that the larvae of cryptolaemus (lady bird beetles) look exactly like mealy bugs.
copying the link for reference of all our friends.
http://www.bugsforbugs.com.au/product/cryptolaemus
Regards
Yazdy.


On Wed, Jul 14, 2010 at 12:39 AM, Neil Soares <drneil...@yahoo.com> wrote:

promila chaturvedi

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18-Jul-2010, 8:54:58 am18/07/10
to Yazdy Palia, Neil Soares, efloraofindia, Pankaj Oudhia
Mealy bugs, after multiplying  can spread and infest other plants touching the infested plants without any assistance from ants and one of the bug in this family can enter the house and make life miserable.
Promila

Yazdy Palia

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18-Jul-2010, 10:22:28 am18/07/10
to promila chaturvedi, Neil Soares, efloraofindia, Pankaj Oudhia
Dear Ms. Promila Chaturvedi Ji,
Am  a lay person and have limited knowledge. The coffee board has come out with information with regards to practices to control mealy bugs. In the literature distributed from them, I find that mealy bugs are immobile sucking pests. I learnt that the best way to control the spread is to control the population of ants nests. I was made to understand that there is a symbiotic relationship between ants and mealy bugs. The ants move the nymphs of mealy bugs and place them in succulent areas of tender shoots. Once they are placed in the place, the nymph attaches itself to the succulent spot and starts sucking the sap.
The ants benefit by the honeydew secreted by the mealy bugs and feed on it. I have never found any plant in my farm that has mealybugs and no ants. If however, you have any new information that contradicts it, am willing to study it with an open mind.
Please guide me to any such link on the net.
Regards
Yazdy.

promila chaturvedi

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22-Jul-2010, 9:42:19 am22/07/10
to Yazdy Palia, Neil Soares, efloraofindia, Pankaj Oudhia
The pest in the picture usually stays on shrubs and hibernate in unsuitable weather conditions. In few years time it succeeds in killing the host. Mosty it is carried by ants. It infested my hibiscus plant and other hibiscus plant in the vicinity. Where ever there was sun these pests work hard and took extra time to kill the plants, in my house where there is no sun four months in a year the plant died faster. They infest other flowering shrubs also, I did not notice any non-flowering shrub, so I cannot comment. The other the biger member of the family Which is also known as mealy bug (as told by Senior horticulturists of CPWD), have infested large trees on New Delhi roads and hop from tree to tree, though the trees so far are in good health. In few societis in Delhi it has infested Muchkund (Pterospermum acerifolium) trees and starting entering the flats and in their ACs  and every nook and corner. They are really a nasty pests.
Promila

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