Safed Jaam on the terrace

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preeti patil

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Mar 6, 2009, 1:53:31 AM3/6/09
to indiantreepix
Sorry for posting a bulk of images. However thought they would be more helpful in a sequence. The final product missing!
 
Our Safed Jaam tree in full bloom on the terrace. And expecting a bumper crop this year!
 
Am little confused over the botanical name. Is this the same as Rosa apple? Syzygium malaccense ?  But the pictures on the net showed up a  different fruit for Rose Apple.
 
Please help with the name.
 
regards
 
Preeti
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Kenneth Greby

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Mar 6, 2009, 8:56:03 AM3/6/09
to indiantreepix, preeti patil
The foliage of this looks like Syzygium malaccense to me.

The common name 'Rose Apple' is typically (at least in USA) applied to Syzygium jambos.

Regards--
Ken Greby
Broward County, Florida USA

--- On Fri, 3/6/09, preeti patil <preet...@gmail.com> wrote:

Yazdy Palia

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Mar 6, 2009, 11:58:47 AM3/6/09
to preeti patil, indiantreepix
Dear Preeti,
This is not Rose apple. The leaves of Rose Apple are long and narrow.
Anybody could get confused and call it Roseapple by looking at the
picture of the flowers and the fruit in the third picture.
Regards
Yazdy Palia.

preeti patil

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Mar 7, 2009, 3:42:30 AM3/7/09
to yazdy...@gmail.com, indiantreepix, fst...@yahoo.com
Yes.thanks... would like to know what the name of the fruit is...
 
Regards
 
Preeti

J.M. Garg

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Mar 18, 2009, 3:55:19 AM3/18/09
to indiantreepix
Forwarding again for any other comments/ feedback pl.

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: preeti patil <preet...@gmail.com>
Date: 2009/3/6
Subject: [indiantreepix:9169] Safed Jaam on the terrace
To: indiantreepix <indian...@googlegroups.com>


For learning about our trees & plants, please visit/ join Google e-group (Indiantreepix) http://groups.google.co.in/group/indiantreepix?hl=en

1.JPG
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5.JPG

J.M. Garg

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Mar 27, 2009, 11:13:21 PM3/27/09
to indiantreepix, Kenneth Greby, preeti patil, Yazdy Palia
Hi, Preeti ji,
It appears to be Syzygium samarangense (Wax Jambu, Java Apple)
Links:http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/wax_jambu.htm (details with flower pix etc.), http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/java_apple.html (details), http://www.montosogardens.com/syzygium_samarangense.htm (little details with fruit pix),
 
Some extracts from Wikipedia link:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wax_apple

Syzygium samarangense (syn. Eugenia javanica) is a species in the Myrtaceae, native to Philippines, Indonesia and Malaysia. Common names include wax apple, love apple, java apple, Chomphu (in Thai), Bellfruit (In Taiwan), jambu air (in Indonesian), water apple, mountain apple, jambu air ("water guava" in Malay), wax jambu, Rose apple, bell fruit, makopa, tambis (Philippines), and chambekka in Malayalam and jumbu (Sri Lanka). It is known as jamalac in French, and zamalac in the French-based creole languages of Mauritius, Reunion, Seychelles and other Indian ocean islands.The wax apple tree also grows in the Caribbean. On Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles, the fruit is called kashu Sürnam in Papiamentu, which means kashu or cashew from Surinam, while in Surinam the fruit is called Curaçaose appel (apple from Curaçao in Dutch), in Trinidad & Tobago it is known as Pommerac.

It is a tropical tree growing to 12 m tall, with evergreen leaves 10-25 cm long and 5-10 cm broad. The flowers are white, 2.5 cm diameter, with four petals and numerous stamens. The fruit is a bell-shaped edible berry, with colors ranging from white, pale green, green, red, purple, crimson, to deep purple or even black, 4-6 cm long in wild plants. The flowers and resulting fruit are not limited to the axils of the leaves and can appear on nearly any point on the surface of the trunk and branches. When mature, the tree is considered a heavy bearer and can yield a crop of up to 700 fruits.[1]

The ripened fruit varies in hue and can be light pink to a dark, almost purple, red. One of the most highly prized and sought after wax apples in Taiwan are "black pearls," which are purplish-red. If it is ripe enough, the fruit will puff outwards, with the middle of the underside of the "bell shape" dented in a touch. Healthy wax apples have a light sheen to them. Despite its rather plain name, a wax apple is anything but plain. A ripe wax apple only resembles an apple on the outside in color. It doesn't taste like an apple. It has neither the fragrance nor the density of an apple. The flavor is a bit like a snow pear. The liquid to flesh ratio of the wax apple is comparable to a watermelon. It's remarkably refreshing and juicy. Unlike either apple or watermelon, the wax apple's flesh has a very loose weave. The very middle holds a seed that's situated in a sort of cotton-candy-like mesh. The mesh is edible but flavorless. The color of its juice depends on the cultivar of the fruit. As well as in its native range, it is also cultivated in tropical regions such as Vietnam, Taiwan, Thailand, Bangladesh, Pakistan, India and Sri Lanka. A number of cultivars with larger fruit have been selected. In general, the paler or darker the color is, the sweeter it is. In South East Asia, the black ones are nicknamed "Black Pearl" or "Black Diamond," while the very pale greenish white ones are called "Pearl." They are among the highest priced ones in fruit markets.

When choosing a good wax apple, look for ones with the bottom segments closed up because open holes signify worm eggs inside the fruit. Also, usually the reddest fruits are the sweetest. To eat, the core is removed and the fruit is served uncut, in order to preserve the unique bell shape presentation.

In Indian ocean island cuisine, the fruit is frequently used in salads, as well in with light sauteed dishes.

2009/3/18 J.M. Garg <jmg...@gmail.com>



--
With regards,
J.M.Garg
"We often ignore the beauty around us"
Creating Awareness about Indian Flora & Fauna:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Jmgarg1

Yazdy Palia

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Mar 28, 2009, 1:51:00 AM3/28/09
to J.M. Garg, indiantreepix, Kenneth Greby, preeti patil
Dear J. M. Gargji,
Many thanks for letting us have the name of the fruit.
I have a couple of these trees bearing so many fruits but did not know the name.
It attracts a lot of birds.
Thanks once again.
Regards
Yazdy Palia.

city farmer

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Apr 12, 2009, 11:25:49 PM4/12/09
to indiantreepix
Hello.....

At last here are the fruits!

http://picasaweb.google.co.in/preetisunil/SafedJaamOnTheTerrace?feat=directlink

Thanks Mr Garg.

Regards
Preeti

On Mar 28, 8:13 am, "J.M. Garg" <jmga...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi, Preeti ji,
> It appears to be *Syzygium samarangense* (*Wax Jambu, Java Apple*)
> Links:http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/wax_jambu.htm(details with flower pix
> etc.),http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/java_apple.html(details),http://www.montosogardens.com/syzygium_samarangense.htm(little details with
> fruit pix),
>
> Some extracts from Wikipedia link:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wax_apple
>
> *Syzygium samarangense* (syn. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synonymy> *Eugenia
> javanica*) is a species in the
> Myrtaceae<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myrtaceae>,
> native to Philippines <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippines>,
> Indonesia<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indonesia>and
> Malaysia <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaysia>. Common names include *wax
> apple*, *love apple*, *java apple*, *Chomphu* (in Thai), *Bellfruit* (In
> Taiwan <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiwan>), *jambu air* (in
> Indonesian<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indonesian_language>),
> *water apple*, *mountain apple*, *jambu air* ("water guava" in
> Malay<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malay_language>),
> *wax jambu*, *Rose apple*, *bell fruit*, *makopa*, *tambis*
> (Philippines<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippine_languages>),
> and *chambekka* in
> Malayalam<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malayalam_language>and jumbu
> (Sri Lanka). It is known as
> *jamalac* in French <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_language>, and *
> zamalac* in the French-based creole
> languages<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creole_languages>of
> Mauritius <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauritius>,
> Reunion<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reunion>,
> Seychelles <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seychelles> and other Indian
> ocean<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_ocean>islands.The wax apple
> tree also grows in the Caribbean. On Curaçao,
> Netherlands Antilles, the fruit is called kashu Sürnam in Papiamentu, which
> means kashu or cashew from Surinam, while in Surinam the fruit is called
> Curaçaose appel (apple from Curaçao in Dutch), in Trinidad & Tobago it is
> known as Pommerac.
>
> It is a tropical tree growing to 12 m tall, with evergreen leaves 10-25 cm
> long and 5-10 cm broad. The flowers are white, 2.5 cm diameter, with four
> petals and numerous stamens. The fruit is a bell-shaped edible berry, with
> colors ranging from white, pale green, green, red, purple, crimson, to deep
> purple or even black, 4-6 cm long in wild plants. The flowers and resulting
> fruit are not limited to the axils of the leaves and can appear on nearly
> any point on the surface of the trunk and branches. When mature, the tree is
> considered a heavy bearer and can yield a crop of up to 700
> fruits.[1]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wax_apple#cite_note-morton-0>
>
> The ripened fruit varies in hue and can be light pink to a dark, almost
> purple, red. One of the most highly prized and sought after wax apples in
> Taiwan are "black pearls," which are purplish-red. If it is ripe enough, the
> fruit will puff outwards, with the middle of the underside of the "bell
> shape" dented in a touch. Healthy wax apples have a light sheen to them.
> Despite its rather plain name, a wax apple is anything but plain. A ripe wax
> apple only resembles an apple on the outside in color. It doesn't taste like
> an apple. It has neither the fragrance nor the density of an apple. The
> flavor is a bit like a snow pear. The liquid to flesh ratio of the wax apple
> is comparable to a watermelon. It's remarkably refreshing and juicy. Unlike
> either apple or watermelon, the wax apple's flesh has a very loose weave.
> The very middle holds a seed that's situated in a sort of cotton-candy-like
> mesh. The mesh is edible but flavorless. The color of its juice depends on
> the cultivar of the fruit. As well as in its native range, it is also
> cultivated in tropical regions such as
> Vietnam<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam>,
> Taiwan <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiwan>,
> Thailand<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thailand>,
> Bangladesh <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bangladesh>,
> Pakistan<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pakistan>,
> India <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/India> and Sri
> Lanka<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sri_Lanka>.
> A number of cultivars <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultivar> with larger
> fruit have been selected. In general, the paler or darker the color is, the
> sweeter it is. In South East Asia, the black ones are nicknamed "Black
> Pearl" or "Black Diamond," while the very pale greenish white ones are
> called "Pearl." They are among the highest priced ones in fruit markets.
>
> When choosing a good wax apple, look for ones with the bottom segments
> closed up because open holes signify worm eggs inside the fruit. Also,
> usually the reddest fruits are the sweetest. To eat, the core is removed and
> the fruit is served uncut, in order to preserve the unique bell shape
> presentation.
>
> In Indian ocean island cuisine, the fruit is frequently used in salads, as
> well in with light sauteed <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saut%C3%A9ing>dishes.
> 2009/3/18 J.M. Garg <jmga...@gmail.com>
>
>
>
>
>
> > Forwarding again for any other comments/ feedback pl.
>
> >  ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> > From: preeti patil <preetisu...@gmail.com>
> > Date: 2009/3/6
> > Subject: [indiantreepix:9169] Safed Jaam on the terrace
> > To: indiantreepix <indian...@googlegroups.com>
>
> >   Sorry for posting a bulk of images. However thought they would be more
> > helpful in a sequence. The final product missing!
>
> > Our Safed Jaam tree in full bloom on the terrace. And expecting a bumper
> > crop this year!
>
> > Am little confused over the botanical name. Is this the same as Rosa apple?
> > S*yzygium malaccense ? * But the pictures on the net showed up a
> > different fruit for Rose Apple.
> > Please help with the name.
>
> > regards
>
> > Preeti
>
> > --
> > With regards,
> > J.M.Garg
> > "We often ignore the beauty around us"
> > Creating Awareness about Indian Flora & Fauna:
> >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Jmgarg1
> > For learning about our trees & plants, please visit/ join Google e-group
> > (Indiantreepix)http://groups.google.co.in/group/indiantreepix?hl=en
>
> --
> With regards,
> J.M.Garg
> "We often ignore the beauty around us"
> Creating Awareness about Indian Flora & Fauna:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Jmgarg1
> For learning about our trees & plants, please visit/ join Google e-group
> (Indiantreepix)http://groups.google.co.in/group/indiantreepix?hl=en- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

J.M. Garg

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Apr 13, 2009, 1:14:51 AM4/13/09
to city farmer, indiantreepix
Hi, Preeti ji,
Your link is not working. As per posting guidelines:
"Links are to be avoided as far as possible as attachments are allowed."


2009/4/13 city farmer <preet...@gmail.com>

J.M. Garg

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Apr 16, 2009, 11:31:41 PM4/16/09
to city farmer, indiantreepix
Here is a reply:
"Here are the pictures....of the fruit!
 
Regards
 
Preeti"

2009/4/13 J.M. Garg <jmg...@gmail.com>
2009/4/13 city farmer <preet...@gmail.com>

For learning about our trees & plants, please visit/ join Google e-group (Indiantreepix) http://groups.google.co.in/group/indiantreepix?hl=en

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