Ficus Krishnae

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Anoop Rajan

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Aug 18, 2008, 4:11:31 PM8/18/08
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Hi,

Few days back me and Tejal saw ficus Krishane at Rani baugh.
Bayculla zoo.

Just wanted to ask is it indian origin, coz some one told me its not
native to india.


Regards
Anoop

J.M. Garg

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Aug 18, 2008, 9:50:59 PM8/18/08
to Anoop Rajan, indiantreepix
Hi, Anoop ji,
It has originated in India. Pl. see the link for details: http://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/Ficus_krishnae.htm

For my Birds, Butterflies, Trees, Landscape pictures etc., visit http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Special:Contributions/J.M.Garg

Madhuri Pejaver

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Aug 19, 2008, 5:23:34 AM8/19/08
to J.M. Garg, indiantreepix
Dear Gargji,
i donot know the origin myself. but just a story can it explain Indian origin? ofcourse i knew the story.
but my doubt, if it has Indian Origin, why there is only one plant in Jijamata Udyan only?/ there may be one or two more which i am not aware of, but not many for sure.
why this plant is not seen commonly around/not in Mumbai, near Mumbai. in yeoor forest?? in forest area near Bhandup, near Thane, in Nagala block?
because i have visited all these areas with tree lovers but not a single tree of Ficus Krishnae is seen.
is it seen at any other place in Maharashtra?
in other states? if so let us know.
According to me Victoria Garden now know as Jijamata Uddyan was built by britishers as a botanical garden. hence they must have brought these plants from different areas, nations, continents?? it can be a collection of plants.
if the plant is indigeous has to get reported from other places from India if not in mumbai
madhuri

--- On Tue, 8/19/08, J.M. Garg <jmg...@gmail.com> wrote:

> From: J.M. Garg <jmg...@gmail.com>
> Subject: [indiantreepix:4263] Re: Ficus Krishnae
> To: "Anoop Rajan" <anoop.r...@gmail.com>
> Cc: "indiantreepix" <indian...@googlegroups.com>
> Date: Tuesday, August 19, 2008, 7:20 AM
> Hi, Anoop ji,
> It has originated in India. Pl. see the link for details:
> http://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/Ficus_krishnae.htm
>
> On Tue, Aug 19, 2008 at 1:41 AM, Anoop Rajan
> <anoop.r...@gmail.com>wrote:
>
> >
> > Hi,
> >
> > Few days back me and Tejal saw ficus Krishane at Rani
> baugh.
> > Bayculla zoo.
> >
> > Just wanted to ask is it indian origin, coz some one
> told me its not
> > native to india.
> >
> >
> > Regards
> > Anoop
> >
> > >
> >
>
>

> --
> With regards,
> J.M.Garg
> "We often ignore the beauty around us"
> For learning about our trees & plants, please visit/
> join Google e-group
> (Indiantreepix)
> http://groups.google.co.in/group/indiantreepix?hl=en

Madhuri Pejaver

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Aug 19, 2008, 5:46:56 AM8/19/08
to Vaishali Kulkarni, indian...@googlegroups.com
Dear Vaishali,
is it natural there or planted.
if planted from where did they get it?
if natural is it only one or more?
let us get information from all on the group . we will be able to understand the distribution of is plant.madhuri


--- On Tue, 8/19/08, Vaishali Kulkarni <vai...@gmail.com> wrote:

> From: Vaishali Kulkarni <vai...@gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [indiantreepix:4270] Re: Ficus Krishnae
> To: formp...@yahoo.com
> Date: Tuesday, August 19, 2008, 3:04 PM
> Hello Madhuri,
>
> I recently saw the ficus Krishane tree in outskirts of
> Bangalore, at a place
> called Vani school, where they have some not so common
> plants planted round
> the school area.
>
> Regards,
> Vaishali.
>
>
> On Tue, Aug 19, 2008 at 2:53 PM, Madhuri Pejaver
> <formp...@yahoo.com>wrote:

satish phadke

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Aug 19, 2008, 5:55:16 AM8/19/08
to Madhuri Pejaver, Vaishali Kulkarni, indian...@googlegroups.com
There is one planted in Garware college campus in Botany Dept.Pune Maharashtra
Satish

Ulhas

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Aug 19, 2008, 6:45:41 AM8/19/08
to indiantreepix
Hi

Krishna's Buttercup Tree as it is known is a variety of Ficus
benghalensis and it is not an independent species. That is why it has
to be written as Ficus benghalensis, Var. krishnae.

Variations in plants happen due to several ecological / environmental
reasons and sometimes those variant plants could be cultivated /
multiplied rataining their characters / variations.

Krishna's Buttercup Tree is such variation which is being cultivated
by grafting in many gardens all over India because of unique shape of
its leaves and the associated story. Of course, the tree itself also
takes a beautiful form like the original plant Ficus benghalensis -
the Banyan tree. I do not think that this variety multiplies
naturally.

Since Ficus benghalensis is indigenous to India, we could also
conclude that the variant 'krishnae' is also indigenous.

Ulhas Rane

Madhuri Pejaver

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Aug 19, 2008, 6:57:14 AM8/19/08
to Ulhas, indiantreepix

thak you Ulahasji.
as you rightly said this might not be breeding naturally, as i have not seen flowers, fruits on this plant as we see on benghalansis.
thanx again
madhuri

--- On Tue, 8/19/08, Ulhas <ulha...@gmail.com> wrote:

Anand Kumar Bhatt

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Aug 19, 2008, 7:26:31 AM8/19/08
to formp...@yahoo.com, Ulhas, indiantreepix
Ficus benghalensis, F. religiosa both are native to India. It can be inferred that F. benghalensis vaar. Krishnae is also native to India.Ulhas has rightly pointed out the posiible reasomen why it is not widespread.
Best wishes,
akbhatt

Kannan AS

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Aug 19, 2008, 11:34:38 AM8/19/08
to phadke...@gmail.com, formp...@yahoo.com, vai...@gmail.com, indian...@googlegroups.com
Most of the Bangaloreans interested in trees would know the large Ficus Krishnae in the North eastern part of Lalbagh.

I have never looked for fruits in the tree, but I will look into it when I visit Lalbagh next time.

Warm Regards,
Kannan.A.S.

J.M. Garg

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Aug 19, 2008, 9:50:59 PM8/19/08
to Kannan AS, phadke...@gmail.com, formp...@yahoo.com, vai...@gmail.com, indian...@googlegroups.com
I have read somewhere, but not getting hand on the book right now.
That it was found first at Bot. Gardens, Howrah, Kolkata. At that time after studies, it was considered a separate species. But subsequently, it was seen that normal Banyan (Ficus bengalensis) trees grew from its seeds in some of the cases. That is why it was considered as a variety & not a separate species.

Kannan AS

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Aug 20, 2008, 1:54:52 AM8/20/08
to phadke...@gmail.com, formp...@yahoo.com, vai...@gmail.com, indian...@googlegroups.com
Most of the Bangaloreans interested in trees would know the large Ficus Krishnae in the North eastern part of Lalbagh.

I have never looked for fruits in the tree, but I will look into it when I visit Lalbagh next time.

Warm Regards,
Kannan.A.S.

satish phadke wrote:

Kannan AS

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Aug 20, 2008, 2:14:10 AM8/20/08
to jmg...@gmail.com, phadke...@gmail.com, formp...@yahoo.com, vai...@gmail.com, indian...@googlegroups.com
Garg ji,

If a normal Banyan tree grows from the seeds, it sounds like the manifestation of a recessive gene.

J.M. Garg wrote:
> I have read somewhere, but not getting hand on the book right now.
> That it was found first at Bot. Gardens, Howrah, Kolkata. At that time after studies, it was considered a separate species. But subsequently, it was seen that normal Banyan ( Ficus bengalensis ) trees grew from its seeds in some of the cases. That is why it was considered as a variety & not a separate species.

Anand Kumar Bhatt

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Aug 20, 2008, 7:23:59 AM8/20/08
to Kannan AS, phadke...@gmail.com, formp...@yahoo.com, vai...@gmail.com, indian...@googlegroups.com
I have never seen Lalbagh ficus krishnae so I don't know how tall it is. Bose and Coudhury's book says that the tree rarely goes beyond 5 meters, and is propagated through cutting and layering. That explains why it is not endemic in India and is not easily grown from seeds as banyan ahd peepal.
akbhatt

Madhuri Pejaver

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Aug 20, 2008, 7:27:01 AM8/20/08
to Kannan AS, indian...@googlegroups.com
it a nice discussion going on. adding a lot in knowledge. this was needed and i think thats the moto of the group.
but Kanna ji i could not understand the part of role of gene you have written.
can you elaborate it please.
madhuri


--- On Wed, 8/20/08, Kannan AS <as_k...@yahoo.com> wrote:

> From: Kannan AS <as_k...@yahoo.com>
> Subject: RE: [indiantreepix:4290] Re: Ficus Krishnae
> To: "jmg...@gmail.com" <jmg...@gmail.com>
> Cc: "phadke...@gmail.com" <phadke...@gmail.com>, "formp...@yahoo.com" <formp...@yahoo.com>, "vai...@gmail.com" <vai...@gmail.com>, "indian...@googlegroups.com" <indian...@googlegroups.com>
> Date: Wednesday, August 20, 2008, 2:05 PM
> Garg ji,
>
> If a normal Banyan tree grows from the seeds, it sounds
> like the manifestation of a recessive gene.
>
> J.M. Garg wrote:
> > I have read somewhere, but not getting hand on the
> book right now.
> > That it was found first at Bot. Gardens, Howrah,
> Kolkata. At that time after studies, it was considered a
> separate species. But subsequently, it was seen that normal
> Banyan ( Ficus bengalensis ) trees grew from its seeds in
> some of the cases. That is why it was considered as a
> variety & not a separate species.
> > On Tue, Aug 19, 2008 at 9:04 PM, Kannan AS <

Kannan AS

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Aug 20, 2008, 4:35:37 AM8/20/08
to jmg...@gmail.com, phadke...@gmail.com, formp...@yahoo.com, vai...@gmail.com, indian...@googlegroups.com
Garg ji,

If a normal Banyan tree grows from the seeds, it sounds like the manifestation of a recessive gene.

J.M. Garg wrote:
> I have read somewhere, but not getting hand on the book right now.
> That it was found first at Bot. Gardens, Howrah, Kolkata. At that time after studies, it was considered a separate species. But subsequently, it was seen that normal Banyan ( Ficus bengalensis ) trees grew from its seeds in some of the cases. That is why it was considered as a variety & not a separate species.

ushodayan thamphy

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Aug 23, 2008, 1:57:20 AM8/23/08
to Anoop Rajan, indiantreepix


Hi all..
 
The Krishna fig is not mentioned in older Indian Floras- certainly not before 1910. There is a small story behind its identification.
The director of the Royal Botanical Garden at Howra, David Prain, has brought a branch of the tree by a resident of calcutta in 1896 who would not say where it came from or how old the tree was. All he revealed was that it grew somewhere close to calcutta, and the tree is an ordinary banyan tree whose leaves were miraculously transformed into little jars by Lord Rama (or Lord Krishna according to a competing legends). He was not able to examine the parent tree.
 
By 1901, Prain had succeeded in growing 2 specimens in the Botanical garden from cutting. One specimen was planted out in the main collection of the garden and the other he send to Kew garden in London to be grown under glass. And while he was waiting for the plants to grow older and develop their first fig, he send specimens of the strange leaves to be examined by expert botonists. one such expert was Dr. C. de Candolle in Geneva.
 
de Candolle studied the pocket leaves closely and likened them to those of pitcher plants.He noticed that this was the kind of pitcher leaf whose outside is made up of the upper surface of the leaf. (In all other cases, it is the underside of the leaf that forms the outside of the pocket.
 But he could not give any reason for this, but said that they might help the tree to retain small quantities of rainwater.
 
de Candolle was faced with a basic question- did these leaves come from a new species of plant? Or were they just strange, anatomical freaks, a chance mutation.
 
de Candolle decided that it was a true natural species in its own right. He would need to examine the figs to confirm this fact, and that might take a few years. In the meantime, he named tha plant Ficus krishnae and published his findings.
 
Sometime in the 1930s it slowly  became clear that the tree was not really a seperate species, but a freakish variety of the banyan. the basis of this discovery was that, if we grow the krishna fig form a cutting, it will produce pocket leaves identical to the mother plant. But when raised form seed, 90 percent of the seedlings revert to the true banyan form, with only 10 percent retaining the unusual pocket leaves. Botanists call such trees bud-sports, and thay are indeed merely horticultural varities of some stable species. that's why and how Ficus krishnae became Ficus benghalensis var. krishnae.
 
This literature is form Trees of Delhi by Pradip krishen page no:335. I thought this information will add a good literature to the discussion.
 
regards,
 
Ushodayan
Programme Officer
Centre for Environment Education
Andhra Pradesh.
 

Anand Kumar Bhatt

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Aug 23, 2008, 4:16:46 AM8/23/08
to ushodayan thamphy, Anoop Rajan, indiantreepix
Thank you Ushodayan for the info.
akbhatt

Swagat

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Aug 23, 2008, 6:08:16 AM8/23/08
to formp...@yahoo.com, J.M. Garg, indiantreepix
I have seen one in Hiranandani - Powai (Mumbai). It's planted there.
 
Regards,
~Swagat
9223217568
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2008/8/19 Madhuri Pejaver <formp...@yahoo.com>

Madhuri Pejaver

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Aug 25, 2008, 10:41:35 AM8/25/08
to ushodayan thamphy, indian...@googlegroups.com

yes indeed, its a very good information added in discusion. thanks for the same.
when i asked the first question i never thought that we will be able collect such good and informative material.
ushodayanji note support information by Ulhasji.
the only point differs that in ulhasjis note he has mentioned that there are no fruits where as in this mail fruit bearing chances are mentioned.
can anybody tell whether fruits are seen on these plants?
as i said i havre not seen fruits anytime, other mails too support it, somebody is going to look out for fruits hencdeforth.
let us see if we notice fruits we will take photos and put on mail.
but i feel ulhasji must be correct there may not be fruits
madhuri

--- On Sat, 8/23/08, ushodayan thamphy <ut.c...@gmail.com> wrote:

> From: ushodayan thamphy <ut.c...@gmail.com>
> Subject: [indiantreepix:4402] Re: Ficus Krishnae
> To: "Anoop Rajan" <anoop.r...@gmail.com>
> Cc: "indiantreepix" <indian...@googlegroups.com>

> few years. In the meantime, he named tha plant *Ficus
> krishnae* and


> published his findings.
>
> Sometime in the 1930s it slowly became clear that the tree
> was not really a
> seperate species, but a freakish variety of the banyan. the
> basis of this
> discovery was that, if we grow the krishna fig form a
> cutting, it will
> produce pocket leaves identical to the mother plant. But
> when raised form
> seed, 90 percent of the seedlings revert to the true banyan
> form, with only
> 10 percent retaining the unusual pocket leaves. Botanists
> call such trees
> bud-sports, and thay are indeed merely horticultural
> varities of some stable

> species. that's why and how *Ficus krishnae* became
> *Ficus benghalensis*var.
> *krishnae.*
> **
> *This literature is form Trees of Delhi by Pradip krishen


> page no:335. I
> thought this information will add a good literature to the

> discussion.*
> **
> regards,
> **


> Ushodayan
> Programme Officer
> Centre for Environment Education

> Andhra Pradesh*.*
> **
>
>


Anand Kumar Bhatt

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Aug 25, 2008, 5:04:30 PM8/25/08
to formp...@yahoo.com, ushodayan thamphy, indian...@googlegroups.com
I think I read somewhere that it has got figs, but if you try to raise plants from the seeds, 90% would revert back to original bargad, and only 10% would be the Krishnae. So that probably is the reason why cutting is used for propagation.
akbhatt

raghu ananth

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Aug 25, 2008, 10:41:20 PM8/25/08
to formp...@yahoo.com, Anand Kumar Bhatt, ushodayan thamphy, indian...@googlegroups.com
 
All.
 
Attached some photographs of the dwarf Ficus Bengalensis var.. Krishnae from Lalbagh, Bangalore. Photo date: 13 Apr 2008. Looks like it was fruiting at that time. 
 
Regards
Raghu

--- On Tue, 26/8/08, Anand Kumar Bhatt <anandkbhatt@gmail..com> wrote:
From: Anand Kumar Bhatt <anand...@gmail.com>
Subject: [indiantreepix:4435] Re: Ficus Krishnae
To: formp...@yahoo.com

Share files, take polls, and make new friends - all under one roof. Click here.
FicusKrishnae-Leaf.jpg
FicusKrishnae-Bark.jpg
FicusKrishnae-Fruit.jpg

Nudrat

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Aug 26, 2008, 3:55:38 AM8/26/08
to indiantreepix
Hello

Ficus krishnae is not considered to be a seprate species as it is not
mentioned as such in Dr. Almeida's Flora of Maharashtra. The tree at
Jijamata Udyan Mumbai does set fruits somewhere between August -
October. The fruits are same like those of FDicus benghalensis and rhe
germination pattern of these two trees are identical as i have worked
on germination pattern of both these trees. So indeed Ficus krishnae
is a var of F. benghalensis.

On Aug 26, 7:41 am, raghu ananth <raghu_...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>  
> All.
>  
> Attached some photographs of the dwarf Ficus Bengalensis var. Krishnae from Lalbagh, Bangalore. Photo date: 13 Apr 2008. Looks like it was fruiting at that time. 
>  
> Regards
> Raghu
>
> --- On Tue, 26/8/08, Anand Kumar Bhatt <anandkbh...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> From: Anand Kumar Bhatt <anandkbh...@gmail.com>
> Subject: [indiantreepix:4435] Re: Ficus Krishnae
> To: formpeja...@yahoo.com
> Cc: "ushodayan thamphy" <ut.ce...@gmail.com>, indian...@googlegroups.com
> Date: Tuesday, 26 August, 2008, 2:34 AM
>
> I think I read somewhere that it has got figs, but if you try to raise plants from the seeds, 90% would revert back to original bargad, and only 10% would be the Krishnae. So that probably is the reason why cutting is used for propagation.
> akbhatt
>
> On Mon, Aug 25, 2008 at 8:11 PM, Madhuri Pejaver <formpeja...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> yes indeed, its a very good information added in discusion. thanks for the same.
> when i asked the first question i never thought that we will be able collect such good and informative material.
> ushodayanji note support information by Ulhasji.
> the only point differs that in ulhasjis note he has mentioned that there are no fruits where as in this mail fruit bearing chances are mentioned.
> can anybody tell whether fruits are seen on these plants?
> as i said i havre not seen fruits anytime, other mails too support it, somebody is going to look out for fruits hencdeforth.
> let us see if we notice fruits we will take photos and put on mail.
> but i feel ulhasji must be correct there may not be fruits
> madhuri
>
> --- On Sat, 8/23/08, ushodayan thamphy <ut.ce...@gmail.com> wrote:
>       Share files, take polls, and make new friends - all under one roof. Go tohttp://in.promos.yahoo.com/groups/
>
>  FicusKrishnae-Leaf.jpg
> 164KViewDownload
>
>  FicusKrishnae-Bark.jpg
> 224KViewDownload
>
>  FicusKrishnae-Fruit.jpg
> 185KViewDownload- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Madhuri Pejaver

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Aug 26, 2008, 6:52:11 AM8/26/08
to Nudrat, indian...@googlegroups.com
this is really interesting.
i think this is the time to visit then jijamata udyan and see the fruits.
did you find the development of 90% seeds as benghalansis and 10% as krishnae?? as what is explained in previous mails?
madhuri
do you have any photo taken? if so can you mail it?
madhuri


--- On Tue, 8/26/08, Nudrat <nudra...@gmail.com> wrote:

> From: Nudrat <nudra...@gmail.com>
> Subject: [indiantreepix:4438] Re: Ficus Krishnae

Madhuri Pejaver

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Aug 26, 2008, 8:44:33 AM8/26/08
to raghu ananth, indian...@googlegroups.com

here Raghuji in your 2nd photo we can see the fruits. they are like figs as discribed by some mail.
wow .thanxs.
it ahs really turned out to be a good discussion
any other information?
every bit is valuable
madhuri

--- On Tue, 8/26/08, raghu ananth <ragh...@yahoo.com> wrote:

> From: raghu ananth <ragh...@yahoo.com>
> Subject: [indiantreepix:4436] Re: Ficus Krishnae
> To: formp...@yahoo.com, "Anand Kumar Bhatt" <anand...@gmail.com>
> Cc: "ushodayan thamphy" <ut.c...@gmail.com>, indian...@googlegroups.com
> Date: Tuesday, August 26, 2008, 8:11 AM
>  
> All.
>  
> Attached some photographs of the dwarf Ficus Bengalensis
> var. Krishnae from Lalbagh, Bangalore. Photo date: 13 Apr
> 2008. Looks like it was fruiting at that time. 
>  
> Regards
> Raghu
>
> --- On Tue, 26/8/08, Anand Kumar Bhatt
> Share files, take polls, and make new friends - all
> under one roof. Go to http://in.promos.yahoo.com/groups/
>


Tejal V.

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Aug 26, 2008, 8:54:03 AM8/26/08
to indiantreepix
I had seen figs on the treeFicus krishnae) on our to Jijamata udyan on 10th August 2008. Anoop could you recollect seeing them too.  
 
-Tejal
 

Madhuri Pejaver

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Aug 26, 2008, 9:48:25 AM8/26/08
to Tejal V., indian...@googlegroups.com
that is something. some news. now let me see when i get time to visit
madhuri


--- On Tue, 8/26/08, Tejal V. <tejal...@gmail.com> wrote:

nita

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Sep 5, 2008, 10:58:04 AM9/5/08
to indiantreepix
hi
on a tree trail at rani baug, byculla, bombay, i spotted figs on the
ficus krishnae. have taken pics. now let me figure out how to upload
them here.. ..... :)

On Aug 26, 6:48 pm, Madhuri Pejaver <formpeja...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> that is something. some news. now let me see when i get time to visit
> madhuri
>
> --- On Tue, 8/26/08, Tejal V. <tejal.ro...@gmail.com> wrote:

Anand Kumar Bhatt

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Sep 5, 2008, 2:42:00 PM9/5/08
to nita, indiantreepix
Somebody earlier had sent pictures. One of them is attached which I had saved.
Best wishes,
akbhatt

--
Anand Kumar Bhatt
A-59, B.S.F.Colony, Bhind Road
Gwalior. 474 005.
Ficus Krishnae figs.jpg
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