efloraofindia:''For Id 03092011MR3’’ differentiate Ram tulas from Krshna tulas Pune

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Madhuri Raut

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Sep 3, 2011, 4:10:54 AM9/3/11
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I have 2 Tulsi plants at home . One is called Ram tulas and the other Krishna Tulas.
I appreciate that Ram tulas is lighter and Krishna tulas is darker. Are there medicinal differences in the two?

Some mythological significance
It is a holy plant
Tulsi leaf is very dear to God Vishnu and more so the seeds called Manjiri in Marathi and my Grandmother would say that God Prefers one Manjiri to gold and silver or any other offering.

Regards
Bhagyashri


ramtulas.jpg
krishnatulas.jpg
ktulas.jpg

Gurcharan Singh

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Sep 3, 2011, 4:30:22 AM9/3/11
to Madhuri Raut, efloraofindia
Madhuri ji
According to my information the common tulsi plant, the Sacred basil or holy basil, botanically Ocimum tenuiflorum L.(syn: O. sanctum L.) is called Krishna tulsi. In fact two types of plants are known for this species: one with green leaves and stem is Sri Tulsi and one with purple leaves and stems as Krishna Tulsi. The essential oil has antibacterial and mosquito repellent properties, leaves used in catarrah, expectorant, in bronchitis , malarial fevers, cutaneous diseases and ringworms.

Ram tulsi (also known as ban tulsi) is Ocimum gratissimum, the shrubby tulsi, having much more stronger scent and often planted as mosquito repellent. used as relief of ear-ache, tooth-ache, also used in cough mixtures. Herb also used in aromatic baths and fumigations for rheumatism and paralysis.


-- 
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired Associate Professor, Department of Botany, SGTB Khalsa College
University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018
Phone: 01125518297; Mobile: 9810359089

Madhuri Raut

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Sep 3, 2011, 5:14:48 AM9/3/11
to Gurcharan Singh, efloraofindia
Thank you so much Gurcharanji for elaborating
Regards
Bhagyashri

Madhuri Pejaver

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Sep 4, 2011, 11:26:33 AM9/4/11
to efloraofindia, Madhuri Raut
Dear Bhagyashri
A small correction. The inflorescence is called as Manjiri and not the seeds.
Thank you
Madhuri

--- On Sat, 3/9/11, Madhuri Raut <iti...@gmail.com> wrote:

Madhuri Raut

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Sep 4, 2011, 10:40:45 PM9/4/11
to Madhuri Pejaver, efloraofindia
Thank you Madhuriji for the correction
Regards
Bhagyashri

promila chaturvedi

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Sep 9, 2011, 8:37:05 AM9/9/11
to Madhuri Raut, Gurcharan Singh, efloraofindia
My grandmother used to collect fallen tulsi seeds (manjari) and keep them in all the rooms to ward off mosquetos.
Promila

Tanay Bose

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Sep 9, 2011, 9:48:49 AM9/9/11
to promila chaturvedi, Madhuri Raut, Gurcharan Singh, efloraofindia
Thats a great idea to repel mosquito in a herbal way
Tanay
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Tanay Bose
Research Assistant & Teaching Assistant.
Department of Botany.
University of British Columbia .
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