Trifolium dubium from Kashmir

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Gurcharan Singh

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Aug 12, 2010, 9:01:29 PM8/12/10
to efloraofindia, Flowers of India
Trifolium dubium Sibth. (syn: T. minus) from Kashmir, often growing in meadows, roadsides and wastelands, and can be easily taken as a species of Medicago, but palmate-trifoliate leaves are distinctive (in Medicago it is pinnately trifoliate with central leaflet on longer stalk) as also drying petals and enclised fruit. Photographed from Botanical Garden below Cheshmashahi on June 26, 2010

Common names: 
English: Yellow suckling clover, Lesser trefoil, Low hop clover, Shamrock, Yellow clover



Used as fodder
 

--
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/

Trifolium-dubium-Kashmir-a.jpg
Trifolium-dubium-Kashmir-b.jpg
Trifolium-dubium-Kashmir-c.jpg

tanay bose

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Aug 13, 2010, 1:25:45 AM8/13/10
to Gurcharan Singh, efloraofindia, Flowers of India
More information about this plant from http://www.fao.org/ag/AGP/agpc/doc/gbase/data/Pf000499.htm
tanay

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Tanay Bose
Research Assistant & Teaching Assistant
Department of Botany
University of British Columbia
3529-6270 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4 (Canada)
Phone: 778-323-4036

Pankaj Kumar

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Aug 13, 2010, 6:14:19 AM8/13/10
to Gurcharan Singh, efloraofindia, Flowers of India
DUBIUM means doubtful.....I imagine whats so doubtful in this...
Pankaj

Gurcharan Singh

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Aug 13, 2010, 8:49:22 AM8/13/10
to Pankaj Kumar, efloraofindia, Flowers of India
No clue about the reason behind the specific epithet dubium, but there are other interesting details:

It is an Irish christian symbol of the Holy Trinity and has a different significance. 

According to legend it was used by St. Patrick in explaining the doctrine of the Trinity; it is now used as the emblem of Ireland. An artificial or real shamrock leaf is customarily worn on St. Patrick's Day.

 Other species also designated as shamrock are Medicago lupulina, Trifolium pratense, Trifolium repens and OxalisThe shamrock was traditionally used for its medical properties and was a popular motif in Victorian times.


-- 
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/ 

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