efloraofindia:''For Id 22082011MR1’’ tall tree with spiky seeds at Pune

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Madhuri Raut

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Aug 22, 2011, 3:24:03 AM8/22/11
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Respected members 
kindly identify the tree with following specifications. I could not photograph it well as it is a very tall tree amongst other trees.  It has thin leaves in bunches with whitish glassy shiny tips. they look like green fibre glass whorls. The lowest branch had tiny red flowers all along. The tree was full of round small berry like fruits. The spiny seeds(i think) had fallen down which I have photographed

Date/Time-  August 2011


Location- Place, Altitude, GPS- Pune Maharashtra


Habitat- Garden/ Urban/ Wild/ Type- Garden


Plant Habit- Tree/ Shrub/ Climber/ Herb-   tree


Height/Length- very tall 


Leaves Type/ Shape/ Size-  green thin strips in bunches with shiny tips 


Flowers Size/ Colour/ Calyx/ Bracts-  small red flowers all along the branch


Fruits Type/ Shape/ Size Seeds-  woody hard seeds


Regards

Bhagyashri


aa.JPG
210820111564.jpg

Plant Diversity

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Aug 22, 2011, 3:28:25 AM8/22/11
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This looks like a 'She Oak' or Casuarina.

Alastair
http://www.facebook.com/PlantDiversity
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Dr. Shiddamallayya Mathapati

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Aug 22, 2011, 7:13:15 AM8/22/11
to Plant Diversity, efloraofindia
Casurina equisitifolia
--
Dr. Shiddamallayya N,
Survey of Medicinal Plant Unit
National Ayurveda Dietetics Research Institute,
(A unit of C C R A S,
Dept. of  AYUSH, Mini. of H & F W,
Govt. of India, New Delhi),
G C P Annexe, Ashoka Pillar
Jayanagar I block,
Bangalore - 560 011
0 - 9449644341

Madhuri Raut

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Aug 22, 2011, 7:22:40 AM8/22/11
to Dr. Shiddamallayya Mathapati, Plant Diversity, efloraofindia
Is this a Indian tree?
Is the pic that I have posted the fruit or seed?
Regards
Bhagyashri

Dr Pankaj Kumar

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Aug 22, 2011, 12:50:58 PM8/22/11
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Casuarina equisetifolia
Not indian but found till Burma.
I think it has been planted in India especially on the beeches for
sand reclaimation.
Pankaj


On Aug 22, 4:22 pm, Madhuri Raut <itii...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Is this a Indian tree?
> Is the pic that I have posted the fruit or seed?
> Regards
> Bhagyashri
>
> On Mon, Aug 22, 2011 at 4:43 PM, Dr. Shiddamallayya Mathapati <
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> snmathap...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Casurina equisitifolia
>

Neil Soares

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Aug 22, 2011, 1:10:38 PM8/22/11
to efloraofindia, Dr Pankaj Kumar
Hi,
 Am from Goa. Was told this and have no reason to believe it is not true...
 
  In the good old days Casuarina trees were planted on beaches to indicate that it was dangerous to swim there. The reason - the women being educated could read the notices to this effect put up on those beaches but not so with the men folk.
 Hence the Casuarina trees and they can still be seen on Calangute, Miramar and a few other such dangerous beaches.
                          With regards,
                            Neil Soares.

--- On Mon, 8/22/11, Dr Pankaj Kumar <sahani...@gmail.com> wrote:

Pankaj Kumar

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Aug 22, 2011, 1:19:08 PM8/22/11
to Neil Soares, efloraofindia
I have seen these trees on almost all beeches of India including Goa. The simple reason being this grows well on beeches as it has its own nitrogen fixing fungus in the roots. 

I cant imagine beeches of Goa to be dangerous (may be at some particular sites they are dangerous) otherwise you can walk kms in water as the slope is very gentle, in comparison to Beeches of Chennai where U cant even go 5m in water as the slope is very steep.

Pankaj

--
***********************************************
"TAXONOMISTS GETTING EXTINCT AND SPECIES DATA DEFICIENT !!"


Pankaj Kumar Ph.D. (Orchidaceae)
Research Associate
Greater Kailash Sacred Landscape Project
Department of Habitat Ecology
Wildlife Institute of India
Post Box # 18
Dehradun - 248001, India

Balkar Arya

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Aug 22, 2011, 8:47:33 PM8/22/11
to Pankaj Kumar, Neil Soares, efloraofindia
Also found in Haryana Wildly particularly wastelands. Quite common here and also planted by Forest deptt
--
Regards

Dr Balkar Singh
Head, Deptt. of Botany and Biotechnology
Arya P G College, Panipat
Haryana-132103
09416262964

Madhuri Raut

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Aug 22, 2011, 11:27:06 PM8/22/11
to Balkar Arya, Pankaj Kumar, Neil Soares, efloraofindia
Thank you all the respected members for identification and interesting information
Regards
Bhagyashri

Mahadeswara

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Aug 22, 2011, 11:48:00 PM8/22/11
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For me the fruits look somewhat different from the C.equisitifolia I
have seen in Chennai and other places. Need to check the foliage and
other characters for confirmation. Casuarina sps are native to
Australia.
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Yazdy Palia

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Aug 23, 2011, 12:05:10 AM8/23/11
to Madhuri Raut, efloraofindia
Casurina for sure. Have a handful of it at my place. Very hard tree,
cultivated these days for use as scaffolding in the construction
industry. The timber is so hard and so full of knots that it is
impossible to be used in furniture. An enthusiastic carpenter found to
his woe that not possible to be used in furniture after breaking a
handful of chisels.
Regards
Yazdy Palia.

Pinki

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Aug 23, 2011, 12:09:23 AM8/23/11
to efloraofindia
Casuarina equisitifolia.....
Casuarina is the word taken from Cassowary, a bird, refers to the
supposed resemblance of the twigs of the species to the plumage of
bird), equisetifolia (“equinus”= horse, + “folium” = leaf, refers to
the drooping twigs, which are suggestive of coarse horse hair)

Alok
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Madhuri Raut

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Aug 23, 2011, 12:34:24 AM8/23/11
to Pinki, efloraofindia
Thank you Mahadeswaraji, Yazdiji and Pinkiji. Pinkiji yes the description of the leaves so aptly resembles  plumage of the
bird and coarse horse hair. 
Just wondering why are Botanical names so difficult? Are they Latin words?

Regards
Bhagyashri

Ushadi micromini

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Aug 23, 2011, 12:47:33 AM8/23/11
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Its planted along river banks and we have some along Dhakuria lakes in
Kolkata...

not allowed to photograph around the lake itself in Kolkata... it was
allowed when we were Calcutta !!!

Soil erosion prevention is ostensibly the reason... but ..I remember
a conference many years ago in Calcutta that too many causarinas
( just like a concentration of Gando Bawal (Prosopsis julifora) in
Gujarat and Aksahmoni tree, a eucalyptus in parts of West Bengal...
draw up a lot of water from the water table, which when very low is
far beyond the reach of native plants and trees... thus native flora
suffers .... there was osme small movement affot to prevent further
plantings... but I do not know what happened to the group that
started it...

DOES ANY one here have any Information about that?


Usha di
=====

Madhuri Raut

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Aug 23, 2011, 3:01:15 AM8/23/11
to Ushadi micromini, efloraofindia
Thank you Ushadiji and Alokji
Regards
Bhagyashri

Madhuri Raut

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Aug 23, 2011, 3:05:58 AM8/23/11
to Ushadi micromini, efloraofindia
Respected Alokji,
Is there a central body in the world which decides the names of newly found species? I mean how does one know whether a particular species is already discovered. Is there some kind of reference database?
Regards
Bhagyashri

On Tue, Aug 23, 2011 at 10:17 AM, Ushadi micromini <micromi...@gmail.com> wrote:

H S

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Aug 23, 2011, 3:09:17 AM8/23/11
to Madhuri Raut, Ushadi micromini, efloraofindia
Casuarina equisetifolia

the plant is planted as wind breaker...

regards,
--
 - H.S.

A scientific man ought to have no wishes, no affections, - a mere heart of stone

Yazdy Palia

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Aug 23, 2011, 3:18:21 AM8/23/11
to Ushadi micromini, efloraofindia
Dear Ushadi ji,
I am no expert, however, I have not seen any adverse results in my
farm even after over 50 years of growing Casurina. Coffee and other
plants are thriving in its proximity. I am not sure that erosion can
be controlled though, by planting Casurina.
Eucalyptus however I have heard, inhibits growth of other plants in
its vicinity. Again, I have not seen any evidence of it at my farm. In
fact the weeds grow luxuriously at its feet.
The logical reason behind growing Casurina on the beaches may be
because it leaves very little leaf litter, easier to keep it clean.
This though is my conclusion, I am not aware of the reasons the
authorities have opted for it on the beaches.
I am afraid, I have not answered your question.
Regards
Yazdy.

On Tue, Aug 23, 2011 at 10:17 AM, Ushadi micromini
<micromi...@gmail.com> wrote:

Mohan V. Chunkath

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Aug 23, 2011, 4:20:51 AM8/23/11
to indian...@googlegroups.com, Ushadi micromini
Dear Friends,

It is mostly grown for poles and firewood. A related species Casuarina junghuhniana, which is fast growing is being promoted by Tamil Nadu Forest Department in recent times.

For deriving the meaning of the specific name 'equisetifolia' should have been split as Equis-horse, seti-hair, and folia-leaves. The leaves actually superficially resemble 'Equisetum', an ancient group of plants called horsetails.

Regards,
Mohan

Madhuri Raut

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Aug 23, 2011, 6:13:47 AM8/23/11
to indian...@googlegroups.com, Ushadi micromini
Thank you Mohanji. 
From your reference I searched on the net for the plant horsetails .Attaching a pic . Yes the leaves of Casuarina equisetifolia look just like the leaves of the plant horsetails.
Regards
Bhagyashri
horsetail.JPG
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