Earpod Wattle tree

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Shantanu Bhattacharya

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26-Aug-2010, 3:46:01 pm26/08/10
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Hi
sharing pics of Phyllode Acacia (Acacia auriculiformis) also called Earpod Wattle and Ear-leaf Acacia. This tree is called Shona-jhuri or Akashmoni in Bengali.
Pics taken at Mukutmanipur, Bankura, West Bengal.
There are huge areas in Mukutmanipur covered by this tree planted by the Forest Dept.
These trees look nice when in full bloom.
 
regards
Shantanu : )
 
 
acacia.jpg
acacia2.jpg

Pankaj Kumar

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26-Aug-2010, 3:59:22 pm26/08/10
to Shantanu Bhattacharya, efloraofindia
Thanks for sharing. Unfortunately this plant is not good for
indigenous vegetation of the area and there is no economical use too.
I really dislike plantation of these by forest departments.
Regards
Pankaj

--
***********************************************
"TAXONOMISTS GETTING EXTINCT AND SPECIES DATA DEFICIENT !!"


Pankaj Kumar Ph.D. (Orchidaceae)
Research Associate
Greater Kailash Sacred Landscape Project
Department of Habitat Ecology
Wildlife Institute of India
Post Box # 18
Dehradun - 248001, India

tanay bose

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26-Aug-2010, 9:17:56 pm26/08/10
to Pankaj Kumar, Shantanu Bhattacharya, efloraofindia
Nice catch but a too long shots
Tanay

--
Tanay Bose
Research Assistant & Teaching Assistant
Department of Botany
University of British Columbia
3529-6270 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4 (Canada)
Phone: 778-323-4036

Shantanu

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27-Aug-2010, 12:30:40 pm27/08/10
to efloraofindia
I agree with you Pankaj ji...
These trees are of no such importance, and they absorb a lot of
moisture from the ground thereby turning the soil dry, and not
allowing other smaller plants to grow around it.
Inspite of all these disadvantages, I dont know why the planting of
these useless exotics are encouraged in our country.
Moreover the pollens of these trees are known to cause allergies in
some people.

Shantanu.

On Aug 27, 6:17 am, tanay bose <tanaybos...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Nice catch but a too long shots
> Tanay
>
> Phone: 778-323-4036- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Vijayasankar

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27-Aug-2010, 2:08:52 pm27/08/10
to Shantanu, efloraofindia
May be because of its ability to grow even in very poor soil conditions.
 
In Auroville near Pondicherry, Joss has 'created' a very good forest (i guess it took about 2 decades for him) with all native species in a wasteland which was initially barren and had nothing in it to support a vegetation. He grew this Acacia as a primary succession species that provided shade and leaf-litter and from which he gradually introduced native elements and developed the forest. After establishment of natural vegetation, he carefully removed all Acacia plants from the community. That way this species was very helpful. If you want to create a green cover in poorest soils, you can opt this species. Of course there are certain native species for the purpose such as Neem, Calotropis, Amla etc but Acacia is comparatively fast-growing.

With regards

Vijayasankar


Pankaj Oudhia

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27-Aug-2010, 2:37:49 pm27/08/10
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Please explain "very poor soil conditions" Vijayashankar ji. I feel we live in India rich in biodiversity and Mother Nature has given us native plants for each and every condition. We have never ending list of choices.

 If possible please send the soil analysis report of plot developed by Joss ji. Or simply inform that during rainy season when anyone goes to that plot whether his or her bike skids or not OR just inform the size of termite mounds in that place I will suggest tens of native plants.

Few months back I was in Bengaluru and observed planner's love towards Rain tree. We have number of species far better than this exotic species but still we are running for tree of Amazon. And no one is opposing it. Whether any one is there to study the harmful effects of rain trees in such large number on native flora and fauna? Then without any such studies who permitted the monoculture of raintree. Why not Bengaluru administration is simply planting Neem trees?

We must not support exotic flora any more. Austalians are very strict. Our previous generations has done lots of mistake like introducing Water hyacinth as ornamental , this generation is also doning by promoting monoculture of exotic Jatropha curcas. They simply ignored that biodiesel can be prepared from native Pongamia, i.e Honge in your region, but in India foreingers are always welcomed and indigenous are kept aside. Am I wrong?

Waiting for the soil analysis report/other observations.

regards

Pankaj Oudhia     

Vijayasankar

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27-Aug-2010, 3:03:35 pm27/08/10
to Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Thanks Pankaj ji for the response.
The forest which i mentioned is called 'Pitchandikulam Forest'. Here is the link: http://www.pitchandikulamforest.org/cms/content/view/95/218/
Contact details are provided in the webpage for further details like soil analysis etc.
 
You rightly said that India is rich in biodiversity. No doubt. We have habitats from 0 m altitude to one of the world's highest mountain systems. We have desert (with poor soil nutrients) to world's highest rainfall areas in our country. These diversified climatic/soil/rainfall conditions support a diversified flora in our country. That's why India is regarded as one of the 'Mega Biodiversity' countries of the world.
 
By the way, when are we going to stop eating exotic vegetables incl. Carrot (Afghanistan origin), Potato (originated in Peru), Tomato (S.America), etc etc????

With regards

Vijayasankar


Pankaj Oudhia

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27-Aug-2010, 3:35:07 pm27/08/10
to efloraofindia
Well said Vijayashankar ji. I commonly face such arguments when I give lectures in support of indigenous species. I humbly reply to them that the error rather crime committed in the past should not be used as reference to commit mistake again.

From "Down to Earth" to BBC everyone supported my campaign "Say No To Jatropha" but still Jatropha is under promotion in large scale. Jatropha seeds have killed five children and thousands of children are reaching to hospitals not only in India but also around the world. The Jatropha supporters argue that electricity has taken more lives than Jatropha but still we are using it.

So there is no end of arguements. I have met the family members of  children died due to Jatropha. A Jatropha promoter was with me. I requested him to put his arguement. He remianed silent. 


Potato, Tomatoes are no doubt exotic but not causing harms like Water Hyacinth, Lantana, Ipomoea carnea etc. That is why I say adopt exotic if there is no alternative but at first check its possible impact on flora and fauna. While introducing Eucalyptus, Austalian Acacia and Rain tree like exotics such studies were not done and native alternatives were ignored.

As you know, Parthenium hysterophorus is exotic species. To manage it Mexican beetle has been introduced. It is under promotion in full swing but the traditional bird catchers claim that when native birds feed on these exotic beetles they get sick and become unfit for consumption. I have written about it through my writings but researchers say that no one will give fund to conduct research on it.

Thanks for the address. I will try to get the details of " Very poor soil conditions." 

regards

Pankaj Oudhia

Pankaj Kumar

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27-Aug-2010, 3:42:52 pm27/08/10
to Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Dear Vijay,
I see another reason for planting this. When you see it from satellite, India looks green. Hope you understand what I meant!! Its just the tendency of the plant to grow well in worst conditions and be in happy green shape ever after...:))
"Very poor soil conditions", I think the better sentence would be, "IN WHATEVER SOIL CONDITIONS", meaning they are not so choosy about where they should grow!!
Pankaj

Pankaj Kumar

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27-Aug-2010, 3:46:47 pm27/08/10
to Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Dear Oudhia Sir,

I dont intend to offend you, but I think, parents should stop their children from eating Jatropha rather than uprooting the plant itself. There are many indigenous plants which are poisonous, what does that mean its the fault of the plant or the person who ate is purposefully or by mistake.

A kid fell down in the well, should be stop digging wells?

Regards
Pankaj

Pankaj Oudhia

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27-Aug-2010, 4:35:04 pm27/08/10
to efloraofindia
Thanks for your message. Jatropha poisoning in Children is only one of negative aspects
of Jatropha. Please read this write up with cross references for more info

Bare Facts about poisonous Jatropha curcas

http://ecoport.org/ep?SearchType=earticleView&earticleId=877&page=-2


Jatropha toxicity is well known and researched. When Jatropha promotion started we suggested the authorities to aware the public about its harmful affects so that accidents can be avoided. But it was ignored. Our past president was great promoter of this plant. He encouraged the children about Jatropha and as result authorities planted it in school compounds and near to human colonies. Children were not made aware about its toxic seeds. Within few months thousands of cases of Jatropha started coming in surface.

In Meerut over school 20 children reached to hospital and seeing anger of residents the authorities ordered to destroy Jatropha.

It is common obervation with Exotics. There must be full prepartion before introducing the species unknown to natives.

We know Jatropha's effect on human population within short time of its large scale plantation but imagine the condition of wildlife as Jatropha is planted inside forest even by cutting indigenous forest. There are endless stories about harms of Jatropha. Now last month when FAO officially declared about its failure now authorities are releasing that the basic plan was wrong.

regards

Pankaj Oudhia

Vijayasankar

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27-Aug-2010, 5:33:08 pm27/08/10
to Pankaj Oudhia, efloraofindia
Well researched article Oudhia ji, thanks for sharing. Its sad to know that the Jatropha plan was a failure. In that case what will happen to the existing plantation if the seeds no longer in use as biodiesel and if the project is abandoned? Have you observed naturalization of this species anywhere?

With regards

Vijayasankar


Shantanu

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28-Aug-2010, 3:11:51 pm28/08/10
to efloraofindia
Well....personal opinions about a species of plant may differ.
There is no doubt that Jatropa can be a potential threat to children
who unknowingly consume the seeds of the plant.
At the same time, the economic importance of the species cannot be
denied.
Jatropa can be used for making the bio-diesel, which is very much
necessary in a country like India, where the demand for energy and
fuel is very high, but the resources are very limited. We have to
import most of the petrol from the South-West, and thats creating a
huge burden on our economy. So its not bad to grow a plant from which
we can get fuel to meet up our requirements.

But that does not mean that we have to plant this 'bio-toxic species'
in human habitations and school gardens. I think the plantation of
Jatropa can be encouraged, but the trees should be grown in areas out
of the reach of people. especially children. These trees should be
considered as a 'petroplant' only, and should not be treated as an
ornamental or avenue tree.

regards
Shantanu : )

On Aug 28, 2:33 am, Vijayasankar <vijay.botan...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Well researched article Oudhia ji, thanks for sharing. Its sad to know that
> the Jatropha plan was a failure. In that case what will happen to the
> existing plantation if the seeds no longer in use as biodiesel and if the
> project is abandoned? Have you observed naturalization of this species
> anywhere?
>
> With regards
>
> Vijayasankar
>
> On Fri, Aug 27, 2010 at 3:35 PM, Pankaj Oudhia <pankajoud...@gmail.com>wrote:
>
>
>
> > Thanks for your message. Jatropha poisoning in Children is only one of
> > negative aspects
> > of Jatropha. Please read this write up with cross references for more info
>
> > Bare Facts about poisonous Jatropha curcas
>
> >http://ecoport.org/ep?SearchType=earticleView&earticleId=877&page=-2
>
> > Jatropha toxicity is well known and researched. When Jatropha promotion
> > started we suggested the authorities to aware the public<http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_twhdJg4SEPM/S0r0_bz3-VI/AAAAAAAAAR0/EIiX9Q4...>about its
> > harmful affects<http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_twhdJg4SEPM/S04W5uVB5II/AAAAAAAAAgE/SJOhODv...>so that accidents can be avoided. But it was ignored. Our past president was
> > great promoter of this plant. He encouraged the children about Jatropha and
> > as result authorities planted it in school compounds and near to human
> > colonies. Children were not made aware about its toxic seeds. Within few
> > months thousands of cases of Jatropha started coming in surface.
>
> > In Meerut over school 20 children reached to hospital and seeing anger of
> > residents the authorities ordered to destroy Jatropha.
>
> > It is common obervation with Exotics. There must be full prepartion before
> > introducing the species unknown to natives.
>
> > We know Jatropha's effect on human population within short time of its
> > large scale plantation but imagine the condition of wildlife as Jatropha is
> > planted inside forest even by cutting indigenous forest. There are endless
> > stories about harms of Jatropha. Now last month when FAO officially declared
> > about its failure now authorities are releasing that the basic plan was
> > wrong.
>
> > regards
>
> > Pankaj Oudhia
>
> > On Sat, Aug 28, 2010 at 1:16 AM, Pankaj Kumar <sahanipan...@gmail.com>wrote:
>
> >> Dear Oudhia Sir,
>
> >> I dont intend to offend you, but I think, parents should stop their
> >> children from eating Jatropha rather than uprooting the plant itself. There
> >> are many indigenous plants which are poisonous, what does that mean its the
> >> fault of the plant or the person who ate is purposefully or by mistake.
>
> >> A kid fell down in the well, should be stop digging wells?
>
> >> Regards
> >> Pankaj
>
> >> On Sat, Aug 28, 2010 at 1:12 AM, Pankaj Kumar <sahanipan...@gmail.com>wrote:
>
> >>> Dear Vijay,
> >>> I see another reason for planting this. When you see it from satellite,
> >>> India looks green. Hope you understand what I meant!! Its just the tendency
> >>> of the plant to grow well in worst conditions and be in happy green shape
> >>> ever after...:))
> >>> "Very poor soil conditions", I think the better sentence would be, "IN
> >>> WHATEVER SOIL CONDITIONS", meaning they are not so choosy about where they
> >>> should grow!!
> >>> Pankaj
>
> >>>>>>>   On Fri, Aug 27, 2010 at 11:30 AM, Shantanu <shnt...@gmail.com>wrote:
>
> >>>>>>>> I agree with you Pankaj ji...
> >>>>>>>> These trees are of no such importance, and they absorb a lot of
> >>>>>>>> moisture from the ground thereby turning the soil dry, and not
> >>>>>>>> allowing other smaller plants to grow around it.
> >>>>>>>> Inspite of all these disadvantages, I dont know why the planting of
> >>>>>>>> these useless exotics are encouraged in our country.
> >>>>>>>> Moreover the pollens of these trees are known to cause allergies in
> >>>>>>>> some people.
>
> >>>>>>>> Shantanu.
>
> >>>>>>>> On Aug 27, 6:17 am, tanay bose <tanaybos...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >>>>>>>> > Nice catch but a too long shots
> >>>>>>>> > Tanay
>
> >>>>>>>> > On Fri, Aug 27, 2010 at 1:29 AM, Pankaj Kumar <
> >>>>>>>> sahanipan...@gmail.com>wrote:
>
> ...
>
> read more »- Hide quoted text -

Pankaj Oudhia

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29-Aug-2010, 2:47:32 am29/08/10
to efloraofindia
Thanks Vijayashankar ji and Shantanu ji for your comments. We are discussing different aspects of Jatropha since year 2005 through "Say No To Jatropha" Yahoo group.

http://in.groups.yahoo.com/group/jatropha/


We can continue discussions through this yahoo group. You are welcome.

regards

Pankaj Oudhia 
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