Wild Flower for ID-010509-RK2

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ranjini kamath

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Apr 30, 2009, 11:22:46 PM4/30/09
to indian...@googlegroups.com
Request Bot.ID. Fam.-Malvaceae?Pic taken at Hebbal Lake-1st Feb.'09
Thank you.
Ranjini Kamath
Hebbal lake 037-a-lev-x.jpg

smilingsmit

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May 1, 2009, 12:05:58 AM5/1/09
to indiantreepix
its Deccan hemp - Hibiscus cannabinus - -Ambari in marathi
love picture!!!!!!!!!!
>  Hebbal lake 037-a-lev-x.jpg
> 147KViewDownload

J.M. Garg

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May 1, 2009, 4:52:39 AM5/1/09
to smilingsmit, indiantreepix
Thanks, Smilingsmit ji.
 

Some extracts from Wikipedia link (for pictures & more details, click on the link):

Kenaf [Etymology: Persian],[1] Hibiscus cannabinus, is a plant in the Malvaceae family. Hibiscus cannabinus is in the genus Hibiscus and is probably native to southern Asia, though its exact natural origin is unknown. The name also applies to the fibre obtained from this plant. Kenaf is one of the allied fibres of jute and shows similar characteristics. Other names include Bimli, Ambary, Ambari Hemp, Deccan Hemp, and Bimlipatum Jute.

It is an annual or biennial herbaceous plant (rarely a short-lived perennial) growing to 1.5-3.5 m tall with a woody base. The stems are 1-2 cm diameter, often but not always branched. The leaves are 10-15 cm long, variable in shape, with leaves near the base of the stems being deeply lobed with 3-7 lobes, while leaves near the top of the stem are shallowly lobed or unlobed lanceolate. The flowers are 8-15 cm diameter, white, yellow, or purple; when white or yellow, the centre is still dark purple. The fruit is a capsule 2 cm diameter, containing several seeds.

Kenaf has a long history of cultivation for its fibre in India, Bangladesh, Thailand, parts of Africa, and to a small extent in southeast Europe. The stems produce two types of fibre, a coarser fibre in the outer layer (bast fibre), and a finer fibre in the core. It matures in 100 to 1,000 days. About 9,000 cultivars are produced.
 
The main uses of kenaf fiber have been rope, twine, coarse cloth (similar to that made from jute), and paper. Emerging uses of kenaf fibre include engineered wood, insulation, and clothing-grade cloth.

Kenaf seeds yield a vegetable oil that is edible. The kenaf oil is also used for cosmetics, industrial lubricants and as bio-fuel.



2009/5/1 smilingsmit <smita....@gmail.com>

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With regards,
J.M.Garg
"We often ignore the beauty around us"
Creating Awareness about Indian Flora & Fauna:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Jmgarg1
For learning about our trees & plants, please visit/ join Google e-group (Indiantreepix) http://groups.google.co.in/group/indiantreepix?hl=en

satish phadke

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May 1, 2009, 10:39:06 AM5/1/09
to ranjini kamath, indian...@googlegroups.com
Hibiscus flowers have beautiful texture which is depicted in your picture.......colours are also very pleasant.
Satish

2009/5/1 ranjini kamath <ranj...@gmail.com>

Request Bot.ID. Fam.-Malvaceae?Pic taken at Hebbal Lake-1st Feb.'09
Thank you.
                Ranjini Kamath





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http:// satishphadke.blogspot.com

ranjini kamath

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May 1, 2009, 10:47:56 AM5/1/09
to satish phadke, indian...@googlegroups.com
Thank you Satish ji
Ranjini Kamath

On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 8:09 PM, satish phadke <phadke...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hibiscus flowers have beautiful texture which is depicted in your
> picture.......colours are also very pleasant.
> Satish
>

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