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sibdas ghosh

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Nov 16, 2007, 10:07:34 AM11/16/07
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Wild fl. Megahatuburu.JPG, for id (photo taken in March,2007)i

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sibdas ghosh

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Nov 16, 2007, 10:09:03 AM11/16/07
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Kumdi-wild flower.JPG for id. (March 07)

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sibdas ghosh

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Nov 17, 2007, 12:45:52 PM11/17/07
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upto24.3-585.JPG

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leena taneja rao

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Nov 18, 2007, 11:23:18 PM11/18/07
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You don't say where 'Kumdi' is, but if it is at any elevation, the shrub is likely to be Woodfordia fruticosa. I am more familiar with it in the Shivaliks and the lower reaches of the Himalayas, though the range is fairly extensive. It typically grows on fairly steep hillsides. From your picture, it looks like it has the opposite lanceolate pointed leaves of the Woodfordia, and the thick red/orange clusters of tubular flowers that cover the spreading branches when it is in bloom.
Apparently, it is a medicinal plant (the bark and leaves are used). A yellow dye is extracted from the leaves and twigs, and a red dye from the flowers.
 
Leena Taneja Rao.

sibdas ghosh <sibda...@gmail.com> wrote:

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sibda...@gmail.com

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Dec 7, 2007, 9:08:21 AM12/7/07
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Recently I find that Woodfordia fruticosa is an endangered plant and
efforts have been taken for its propagation through tissue culture
(Krishnan and Seani, 1994). In Kumdi area of Saranda Forest I found
them abundant- Sibdas Ghosh

On Nov 19, 9:23 am, leena taneja rao <leena...@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
> You don't say where 'Kumdi' is, but if it is at any elevation, the shrub is likely to be Woodfordia fruticosa. I am more familiar with it in the Shivaliks and the lower reaches of the Himalayas, though the range is fairly extensive. It typically grows on fairly steep hillsides. From your picture, it looks like it has the opposite lanceolate pointed leaves of the Woodfordia, and the thick red/orange clusters of tubular flowers that cover the spreading branches when it is in bloom.
> Apparently, it is a medicinal plant (the bark and leaves are used). A yellow dye is extracted from the leaves and twigs, and a red dye from the flowers.
>
> Leena Taneja Rao.
>
> sibdas ghosh <sibdasgh...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> You have been sent 1 picture.
>
> Kumdi-wild flower.JPG for id. (March 07)
>
> These pictures were sent with Picasa, from Google.
> Try it out here:http://picasa.google.com/
>
> ---------------------------------
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