Dalbergia melanoxylon

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satish phadke

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Apr 14, 2008, 11:30:45 AM4/14/08
to indiantreepix, wildflowerindia

Dalbergia melanoxylon.
Photograph taken today14 Apr 2008.Pune.Vetal Tekdi.
Fabaceae.
A lot of trees planted in Pune university campus in British era.
Satish
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SATISFIED http://satishphadke.blogspot.com/
Dalbergia melanoxylon1.jpg
Dalbergia melanoxylon2.jpg

J.M. Garg

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Apr 14, 2008, 11:24:34 PM4/14/08
to satish phadke, indiantreepix
Here are some extracts from Wikipedia link:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_Blackwood

African Blackwood or Mpingo (Dalbergia melanoxylon) is a flowering plant in the family Fabaceae, native to seasonally dry regions of Africa from Senegal east to Eritrea and south to the Transvaal in South Africa.

It is a small tree, reaching 4-15 m tall, with grey bark and spiny shoots. The leaves are deciduous in the dry season, alternate, 6-22 cm long, pinnate, with 6-9 alternately arranged leaflets. The flowers are white, produced in dense clusters. The fruit is a pod 3-7 cm long, containing one to two seeds.

The dense, lustrous wood ranges from reddish to pure black. It is generally cut into small billets or logs with its sharply demarcated bright yellow white sapwood left on to assist in the slow drying so as to prevent cracks developing. Good quality "A" grade African Blackwood commands high prices on the commercial timber market. The tonal qualities of African Blackwood are particularly valued when used in woodwind instruments, principally Highland pipes, clarinets, oboes and Northumbrian pipes. Furniture makers from the time of the Egyptians have valued this timber.

Due to overuse, the mpingo tree is severely threatened in Kenya and needing attention in Tanzania and Mozambique. The trees are being harvested at an unsustainable rate, partly because of illegal smuggling of the wood into Kenya, but also because the tree takes upwards of 60 years to mature.


 
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SATISFIED http://satishphadke.blogspot.com/
For my Birds, Butterflies, Trees, Landscape pictures etc., visit  http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Special:Contributions/J.M.Garg
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