Could someone help me for ID(1 /10-11-2008)

3 views
Skip to first unread message

Samir Takaochi

unread,
Nov 9, 2008, 6:55:50 PM11/9/08
to indiantreepix
Could someone help me for ID?
コピー ~ DSC08084.JPG

Kenneth Greby

unread,
Nov 9, 2008, 8:03:15 PM11/9/08
to indiantreepix, Samir Takaochi
Greetings--

 This appears to be Yucca gloriosa, Soft-tipped Yucca.

Regards--
Ken Greby
Palmetto Bay, Florida USA

--- On Sun, 11/9/08, Samir Takaochi <band...@gmail.com> wrote:

Samir Takaochi

unread,
Nov 10, 2008, 12:05:49 AM11/10/08
to fst...@yahoo.com, indiantreepix
I have searched it that native area is your place, southen part of north america including florida!
Samir Takaochi
2008/11/10 Kenneth Greby <fst...@yahoo.com>

J.M. Garg

unread,
Nov 10, 2008, 2:22:28 AM11/10/08
to Samir Takaochi, fst...@yahoo.com, indiantreepix
Extracts of Yucca gloriosa from Wikipedia link:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yucca_gloriosa

Yucca gloriosa is an evergreen shrub of the family Agavaceae, and of the genus Yucca. Common names include Spanish Dagger, Moundlily Yucca, Soft-tipped Yucca, Spanish Bayonet or Sea Islands Yucca.

Caulescent, 0.5-2.5 m tall, usually with several stems from the base, base thickened in adult specimens, branched above, rhizomatous, leaves straight, very stiff, 0.3-0.5 m long, 2-3.5 cm wide, dark green, light grey-green, margins entire, smooth, rarely fine denticulate, acuminate, with a sharp, brown, terminal spine, underside smooth. Inflorescence paniculate, 0.6-1.5 m tall, partially inferior to the leaves, flowers campanulate to elongate, numerous, pendulous, white, sometimes tinged purple or red, 3.5 cm long, fruits green, when ripe brownish, indehiscent, 5-8 cm long, 2.5 cm wide, obovate, seeds black, thickened. Yucca gloriosa grows on sand dunes along the coast and barrier islands of the southeastern USA, often together with Yucca aloifolia and Yucca recurvifolia. In contrast to Y. recurvifolia, the leaves of Y. gloriosa are hard stiff, erect and narrower. On the other hand, Y. aloifolia has leaves with denticulate margins and a sharp-pointed, terminal spine. The flowering period is the end of summer and autumn whereas Y. recurvifolia blooms in spring.

The plant is known to thrive as a domestic plant [2] and is sold internationally. In a domestic environment, the plant has average water requirements, and little maintenance is needed other than the removal of dead leaves when the shrub nears its ultimate height.[3] The plant has been seen to suffer leaf damage at temperatures below 4 °C (40°F).[3]

Other good links:http://www.floridata.com/ref/Y/yucc_glo.cfm, http://cals.arizona.edu/pima/gardening/aridplants/Yucca_gloriosa.html


For learning about our trees & plants, please visit/ join Google e-group (Indiantreepix) http://groups.google.co.in/group/indiantreepix?hl=en

Kenneth Greby

unread,
Nov 10, 2008, 7:08:54 AM11/10/08
to indian...@googlegroups.com
Samir--

 This is a very common landscape plant in Southern California, USA and somewhat less so in Florida, USA. There is some taxonomical confusion regarding it. Some people describe it as Yucca elephantipes, a very similar, but more tree-like species. Other people think it may be a hybrid between Y. gloriosa and Y. elephantipes.

 Regardless of its name, it will make a large shrub or small tree to approximately 5m tall. White flowers in large, branched stalks to approximately 0.5m tall occur once the plant reaches flowering age, usually about  five years old.


Regards--
Ken Greby
Palmetto Bay, Florida USA  

--- On Sun, 11/9/08, Samir Takaochi <band...@gmail.com> wrote:
From: Samir Takaochi <band...@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [indiantreepix:/] Could someone help me for ID(1 /10-11-2008)
To: fst...@yahoo.com
Date: Sunday, November 9, 2008, 10:43 PM

Kenneth, thank you so much for your kind reply.
I have searched on web. It might be Yucca gloriosa.
I have never seen the flower so far. I expect it to bloom.
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages