shrub spp

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saravanan.k,9787454854 M.Sc (forestry),

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Dec 17, 2008, 6:47:45 PM12/17/08
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regards

K.Saravanan M.Sc (forestry),P.G Hostel
Forest College and Research Institute,
Mettupalayam - 641301
Coimbatore District,Tamilnadu
mobile: 9787454854

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Neil Soares

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Dec 17, 2008, 9:11:03 PM12/17/08
to saravanan.k,9787454854 M.Sc (forestry),, indian...@googlegroups.com
HiSaravanan,
    It is the Painted Thorn bush [Dichrostachys cinerea].
                     With regards,
                       Neil Soares.

--- On Thu, 12/18/08, saravanan.k,9787454854 M.Sc (forestry), <ksarav...@gmail.com> wrote:

J.M. Garg

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Dec 17, 2008, 9:39:46 PM12/17/08
to drneil...@yahoo.com, saravanan.k,9787454854 M.Sc (forestry),, indian...@googlegroups.com
Thanks, Neil ji,
Some extracts from Wikipedia link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichrostachys_cinerea

Dichrostachys cinerea also known as a Bell mimosa, Chinese lantern tree, Kalahari Christmas tree (South Africa) or a sicklebush, is a legume of the genus Dichrostachys in the Fabaceae family. [1]

The generic name 'Dichrostachys' means '2-coloured spike', and 'cinerea' refers to the greyish hairs of the typical subspecies, obtained from the Greek 'konis' and the Latin 'cineres'.

It is native mostly to Africa and parts of Southeast Asia

Dichrostachys cinerea is a semi-deciduous to deciduous tree characterised by bark on young branches, dark grey-brown fissures on older branches and stems and smooth on the spines. They typically grow up to 7 metres in height and have strong alternate thorns, generally up to 8 cm long. Flowers of the Dichrostachys cinerea are characteristically in bicoloured cylindrical spikes that resemble Chinese lanterns and are 6-8 cm long and fragrant. [4]Upper flowers of a hanging spike are sterile, and are of a lilac or pale purple. Pods are usually a mustard brown and are generally twisted or spiralled and may be up to 100 x 15 mm. The species has can be subcategorized with 2 slight variations that have been recognised. D. cinerea ssp. africana and D. cinerea ssp. nyassana, the latter which is typically larger and less hairy in its foliage. [1] In India it can occur in dry deciduous forest.

Fruit and seeds that grow on Dichrostachys cinerea are edible. Cattle, camels and game such as giraffe, buffalo, kudu, hartebeest, nyala, red duiker and Damara dik-dik feed on the juicy pods that fall to the ground. Such animals also feed on the immature twigs and leaves of the tree and are rich in protein (11-15%) and minerals. The flowers can be a valuable source of honey . The wood is of a dense nature and in bunring slowly with no toxicity, it is often used for fuelwood. The species yields a medium to heavy, durable hardwood and are often used in smaller domestic items as walking sticks, handles, spears and tool handles particularly in central Africa. In medicine, bark is used to alleviate headache, toothache, dysentery, elephantiasis and root infusions are consumed to treat leprosy, syphilis coughs, as an anthelmintic, purgative and strong diuretic. The leaves are particularly useful and can be beaten to treat epilepsy and can also be taken as a diuretic and laxative, and its powder can be used in the massage of fractures.[1]

The roots have been known to treat bites or stings. As they are rich in nutrients they are often used as a manure, particularly in the Sahel region of Africa along the riverbanks. [5]The plant is widely used for soil conservation, particularly in India, for shallow soils, aand in arid western and subhumid alluvial plains.

Although it has its uses, it is considered a threat to agricultural production and is listed on the Global Invasive Species Database [3]



For learning about our trees & plants, please visit/ join Google e-group (Indiantreepix) http://groups.google.co.in/group/indiantreepix?hl=en

Mahadeswara Swamy

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Dec 20, 2008, 6:41:51 AM12/20/08
to drneil...@yahoo.com, J.M. Garg, saravanan.k,9787454854 M.Sc (forestry),, indian...@googlegroups.com

A very common shrub of TDEF on Eastern Coast. One can see this shrub in Guindy National Forest, Chennai

--- On Thu, 18/12/08, J.M. Garg <jmg...@gmail.com> wrote:

> From: J.M. Garg <jmg...@gmail.com>
> Subject: [indiantreepix:6587] Re: shrub spp
> To: drneil...@yahoo.com
> Cc: "saravanan.k,9787454854 M.Sc (forestry)," <ksarav...@gmail.com>, indian...@googlegroups.com
> Date: Thursday, 18 December, 2008, 8:09 AM
> Thanks, Neil ji,
> Some extracts from Wikipedia link:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichrostachys_cinerea
>
> *Dichrostachys cinerea* also known as a *Bell mimosa*,
> *Chinese lantern tree
> *, *Kalahari Christmas tree* (South
> Africa<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Africa>)
> or a *sicklebush*, is a legume
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legume> of the
> genus *Dichrostachys
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichrostachys>* in the
> Fabaceae <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fabaceae>
> family.
> [1]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichrostachys_cinerea#cite_note-World_Agroforesty_Centre-0>
>
> The generic name '*Dichrostachys*' means
> '2-coloured spike', and 'cinerea'
> refers to the greyish hairs of the typical subspecies,
> obtained from the
> Greek <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_language>
> 'konis' and the
> Latin<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin>'cineres'.
> It is native mostly to Africa
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Africa> and
> parts of Southeast Asia
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southeast_Asia>
>
> *Dichrostachys cinerea* is a
> semi-deciduous<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semi-deciduous>to
> deciduous
> tree <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deciduous_tree>
> characterised by
> bark<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bark>on young
> branches, dark
> grey-brown fissures on older branches and stems and
> smooth on the spines. They typically grow up to 7 metres in
> height and have
> strong alternate thorns
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thorn>, generally up
> to 8 cm long. Flowers of the *Dichrostachys cinerea* are
> characteristically
> in bicoloured cylindrical spikes
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spike> that
> resemble Chinese lanterns and are 6-8 cm long and fragrant.
> [4]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichrostachys_cinerea#cite_note-3>Upper
> flowers <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flower> of a
> hanging spike are
> sterile, and are of a lilac or pale
> purple<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purple>.
> Pods are usually a mustard
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mustard> brown and
> are generally twisted or spiralled and may be up to 100 x
> *15 mm. The
> species has can be subcategorized with 2 slight variations
> that have been
> recognised.* D. cinerea *ssp. africana* and *D. cinerea*
> ssp. *nyassana*,
> the latter which is typically larger and less hairy in its
> foliage.
> [1]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichrostachys_cinerea#cite_note-World_Agroforesty_Centre-0>
> In
> India it can occur in dry deciduous
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deciduous>forest.
>
> Fruit and seeds that grow on Dichrostachys cinerea are
> edible. Cattle,
> camels and game such as giraffe
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffe>,
> buffalo <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffalo>,
> kudu<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kudu>,
> hartebeest, nyala
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nyala>, red
> duiker<http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Red_duiker&action=edit&redlink=1>and
> Damara
> dik-dik <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damara_dik-dik>
> feed on the juicy pods
> that fall to the ground. Such animals also feed on the
> immature twigs and
> leaves of the tree and are rich in
> protein<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protein>(11-15%)
> and minerals.
> The flowers can be a valuable source of
> honey <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey> . The wood
> is of a dense nature
> and in bunring slowly with no toxicity, it is often used
> for fuelwood. The
> species yields a medium to heavy, durable hardwood and are
> often used in
> smaller domestic items as walking sticks, handles, spears
> and tool handles
> particularly in central Africa. In
> medicine<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medicine>,
> bark is used to alleviate headache
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Headache>,
> toothache <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toothache>,
> dysentery<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dysentery>,
> elephantiasis
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elephantiasis> and root
> infusions are consumed to treat
> leprosy<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leprosy>,
> syphilis <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syphilis>
> coughs, as an anthelmintic,
> purgative and strong diuretic. The leaves are particularly
> useful and can be
> beaten to treat epilepsy and can also be taken as a
> diuretic and
> laxative<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laxative>,
> and its powder can be used in the massage of
> fractures.[1]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichrostachys_cinerea#cite_note-World_Agroforesty_Centre-0>
>
> The roots have been known to treat bites or stings. As they
> are rich in
> nutrients they are often used as a
> manure<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manure>,
> particularly in the Sahel
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sahel> region of
> Africa along the riverbanks.
> [5]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichrostachys_cinerea#cite_note-4>The
> plant is widely used for soil conservation, particularly in
> India, for
> shallow soils, aand in arid western and subhumid alluvial
> plains.
>
> Although it has its uses, it is considered a threat to
> agricultural
> production and is listed on the Global Invasive Species
> Database
> [3]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichrostachys_cinerea#cite_note-Global_Invasive_Species_Database-2>
>
> On Thu, Dec 18, 2008 at 7:41 AM, Neil Soares
> <drneil...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > HiSaravanan,
> > It is the Painted Thorn bush [Dichrostachys
> cinerea].
> > With regards,
> > Neil Soares.
> >
> > --- On *Thu, 12/18/08, saravanan.k,9787454854 M.Sc
> (forestry), <
> > ksarav...@gmail.com>* wrote:
> >
> > From: saravanan.k,9787454854 M.Sc (forestry),
> <ksarav...@gmail.com>
> > Subject: [indiantreepix:6584] shrub spp
> > To: "indiantreepix"
> <indian...@googlegroups.com>
> > Date: Thursday, December 18, 2008, 5:17 AM
> >
> >
> > regards
> >
> > K.Saravanan M.Sc (forestry),P.G Hostel
> > Forest College and Research Institute,
> > Mettupalayam - 641301
> > Coimbatore District,Tamilnadu
> > mobile: 9787454854
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > >
> >
>
>
> --
> With regards,
> J.M.Garg
> "We often ignore the beauty around us"
> Creating Awareness about Indian Flora & Fauna:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Jmgarg1
> For learning about our trees & plants, please visit/
> join Google e-group
> (Indiantreepix)
> http://groups.google.co.in/group/indiantreepix?hl=en
>
>

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Anand Kumar Bhatt

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Dec 20, 2008, 12:56:35 PM12/20/08
to saravanan.k,9787454854 M.Sc (forestry),, indian...@googlegroups.com
Good photographs, Sarvanan! Try to keep to 150 KB size of photographs, as per the guidelines.
Best wishes,
akbhatt

On Thu, Dec 18, 2008 at 7:41 AM, Neil Soares <drneil...@yahoo.com> wrote:

Anand Kumar Bhatt

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Dec 22, 2008, 11:13:25 AM12/22/08
to saravanan.k,9787454854 M.Sc (forestry),, indiantreepix
You have to use Photosho. Some versions of Adobe Photoshop you can download free from the net. Adobe Photoshop Lightroom is user-friendly. Its version 1 probably yo could download free- you have to check. Version 2 trial version you can download free but you can use it only for a month.
As per the indiantreepix directives, you shoud use
size 150 KB
pixels 800X600
DPI 72
and quality setting 5 to 10
 
TRy you will get the handg of Photoshop.
Best wishes,
akbhatt

On Mon, Dec 22, 2008 at 5:32 AM, saravanan.k,9787454854 M.Sc (forestry), <ksarav...@gmail.com> wrote:
sir i dont know how to reduce photographs size....i am using 4
megapixal digi cam...here after i am going to use 8 mega pix....any
body knows how to reduce photographs size please tell me...

--


K.Saravanan M.Sc (forestry),P.G Hostel
Forest College and Research Institute,
Mettupalayam - 641301
Coimbatore District,Tamilnadu
mobile: 9787454854

2008/12/20 Anand Kumar Bhatt <anand...@gmail.com>:



--
Anand Kumar Bhatt
A-59, B.S.F.Colony, Airport Road
Gwalior. 474 005.
Tele: 0751-247 2233. Mobile 0 94253 09780.

J.M. Garg

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Dec 22, 2008, 8:40:05 PM12/22/08
to Anand Kumar Bhatt, saravanan.k,9787454854 M.Sc (forestry),, indiantreepix
To clarify the matter futher, Size should be within 150 KB.  To make it possible, we have to keep possibly within the following (though there is no restriction on them if 150 KB size is achieved otherwise):
"pixels 800X600,
DPI 72
and quality setting 5 to 10"

2008/12/22 Anand Kumar Bhatt <anand...@gmail.com>
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