Lygodium flexcuosum-climbing fern

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rashida atthar

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Sep 7, 2009, 2:42:49 AM9/7/09
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Perhaps the only climbing fern in India was seen at the national park in Mumbai yesterday. The variuos stages were seen at the same place. It is very interesting to read about the fern. In India  it is being used in Ayurveda and by tribals like Santhals and others whereas, it is considered a weed in Statesand some other countries.
 
regards,
Rashida.
 
 
  
 


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Lygodium flexcuosum stage1.JPG
Lygodium flexcuosum2.JPG
Lygodium flexcuosum3.JPG
Lycodium flexcuosum 4.JPG
Lygodium flexcuosum stage4.JPG
Lygodium flexcuosum finalS.JPG
Lygodium flexcuosum final stage.JPG

rashida atthar

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Sep 7, 2009, 6:04:16 AM9/7/09
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Sorry spelling correction, it should read without the 'C' as Lygodium flexuosum (L.) sw.
I do not know what sw stands for. Experts may please enlighten us on the same. Thank you.
 
regards,
Rashida.


 



 

From: rashid...@hotmail.com
To: indian...@googlegroups.com
Subject: [indiantreepix:17825] Lygodium flexcuosum-climbing fern
Date: Mon, 7 Sep 2009 06:42:49 +0000

Stephen A

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Sep 7, 2009, 6:39:48 AM9/7/09
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Dear,

Sw means

Swartz, Olof or Olavo (Peter) (1760-1818)


In botanical nomenclature the two terms are known as Generic name and specific epithet.
This is known as Binomial nomenclature.
Usually it follows an author name who describe that particular species first.
In your case (L.) stands for Linnaeus who described this species first but later Swartz changed this name according to his own research. That is why the first author is given in brackets.
This is called author citation.
This is very much useful in order to know who has described this particular species and to locate the original publication in which it got published.

Hope you got clarified, if you don't feel free to ask your doubts.

Regards,


Stephen...
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rashida atthar

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Sep 7, 2009, 6:52:05 AM9/7/09
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Thank you Mr. Stephen for the explanation. If some other reseacher makes further changes, or discovers something new of the fern how will the be citation change then? Thank you.

 

regards,

Rashida.  

 



 



Date: Mon, 7 Sep 2009 16:09:48 +0530
Subject: [indiantreepix:17850] Re: Lygodium flexcuosum-climbing fern
From: stephan...@gmail.com
To: rashid...@hotmail.com
CC: indian...@googlegroups.com

Stephen A

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Sep 7, 2009, 7:05:53 AM9/7/09
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The fist author only get the credit if at all any alteration made in the name.
For example Lygodium flexuosum (L.) Sw. transferred to some other genera, then it should be read as Generic Name + flexuosum (L.) New author's name, who have modified and emended.
Not L. flexuosum (L.) (Sw.) Xx.

More you can learn from the following link,
http://www.bgbm.fu-berlin.de/iapt/nomenclature/code/SaintLouis/0001ICSLContents.htm

Their you can check for Author citation,
under the section of Chapter III Effective and valid publication.

That will give you a better idea about the botanical nomenclature.

Regards,

Stephen...

Pankaj Kumar

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Sep 7, 2009, 7:16:20 AM9/7/09
to Stephen A, rashida atthar, indian...@googlegroups.com
the latest Vienna Code of ICBN can be accessed at the following link

http://www.ibot.sav.sk/karolx/kod/0000Viennatitle.htm

Just to add to the information by Dr. Stephen, the bracketed author is
often referred to as the author of the basionym.

Regards
Pankaj

Stephen A

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Sep 7, 2009, 7:30:41 AM9/7/09
to Pankaj Kumar, rashida atthar, indian...@googlegroups.com
Yea I do agree it is called Basionym.
The exact definition mentioned in the ICBN is follows,
"A previously published legitimate name-bringing or epithet-bringing synonym from which a new name is formed for a taxon of different rank or position
"
The same can be located from the following link,
http://ibot.sav.sk/icbn/no%20frames/0120AppendixVII.htm

The latest Vienna code link given by you is broken
The same can be located from the following link.
http://ibot.sav.sk/icbn/main.htm

Regards,

Stephen...

rashida atthar

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Sep 7, 2009, 8:48:14 AM9/7/09
to stephan...@gmail.com, sahani...@gmail.com, indian...@googlegroups.com
Thank you very much Dr. Stephen for the very pertinent explanations and links.
 
May I ask one more question which I have had for a while now, it pertains to the  classification systems adopted. I wish to know which  is the dominant system of classification, the one based on plant characteristics or the one based on plant relations which I believe leads to re-classification of some of the plants into a different family altoghether. Is there any other system adopted by researchers? Thank you.
 
regards,
Rashida.  


 



 

Date: Mon, 7 Sep 2009 17:00:41 +0530
Subject: [indiantreepix:17855] Re: Lygodium flexcuosum-climbing fern
From: stephan...@gmail.com
To: sahani...@gmail.com
CC: rashid...@hotmail.com; indian...@googlegroups.com

Stephen A

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Sep 8, 2009, 2:49:44 AM9/8/09
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Regarding classification doubt, as of India and Indians concern most dominant one is Bentham and Hooker's classification followed by many other classifications based on the phylogeny, life form, etc...
Yes, indeed several researchers adopt many other classifications based on monographic works of individual families or genera, etc...
But ecologists prefer life form or functional classification of plants.

The recent taxonomic classification is APG II system of classification.

You can get a clear overview of system of plant classification available so far from the following wikipedia link,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_systems_of_plant_taxonomy

Regards,


Stephen...

Pankaj Kumar

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Sep 8, 2009, 3:02:06 AM9/8/09
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Dear Rashida

It is not that Indians consider Bentham and Hooker's classification
only, its up to you if you wish to follow which classification. Some
times I even go against APG II as some points, one of which is, APG II
considers Acslepiadaceae as a part of Apocynaceae and and not as a
distinct family, tell me will you agree with it or not.
Incase you are working on any research article, you just need to say
which classification you have followed, and that may not be B & H.
Bentham and Hooker's classification is followed throughout the world
for maintaining the herbaria because it is supposed to be very easy to
understand.
Regards
Pankaj
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Stephen A

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Sep 8, 2009, 4:57:04 AM9/8/09
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Yea, I do agree dear Pankaj,
B & H system is widely followed in herbaria
But as far as am concern system of classification must give some information in terms of their ecological distribution.
Because am basically work in terms of the climatic drivers of the ecosystem, deciphering based on plant markers.
So, it is up to you to decide which classification is suited for your research.
As far as pure taxonomic classification, yes you can chose your own and just mention it in your article, just I have followed particular classification.

And that's why I have used most dominant one is B & H's system of classification.
It means several other classifications also used to classify plants but their frequency of usage is limited.

Regards,

Stephen...

rashida atthar

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Sep 8, 2009, 9:24:01 AM9/8/09
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Thank you very much Dr. Stephen. Very informative links which has also lead me to explore related areas in books.

 

regards,

Rashida.

 



 



Date: Tue, 8 Sep 2009 12:19:44 +0530
Subject: [indiantreepix:17938] Re: Lygodium flexcuosum-climbing fern
From: stephan...@gmail.com
To: rashid...@hotmail.com
CC: sahani...@gmail.com; indian...@googlegroups.com

rashida atthar

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Sep 8, 2009, 9:56:13 AM9/8/09
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Thank you very much Dr. Pankaj for bringing in your perspective. As I read I realize that there is an entirely new group of taxonomists who in 1998, have come up with a revised system of classification, and I believe it is followed in some syllabus abroad based on DNA sequence and cladistic information.
 
I have learned a little bit of the two families you have mentioned, Apocynaceae and Asclepiadaceae after having seen some of the plants in the forests and parks from both the families in Mumbai, and refering to the book by Prof. R.N. Sutaria (1969), pg: 305 to 333. Here the main diferences have been listed by the author some of which are : Leaves opposite or whorled, exstipulate, the presence of intramarginal vein present, milky or watery juice in Apocynaceae. Leaves opposite, decussant, simple, entire, exstipulate, intramarginal vein not present in  Asclepiadaceae.
 
Apocynaceae not succulent in habit  whereas Asclepiadaceae is mostly succulent and so on. So they look distinct to me.
 
regards,
Rashida.

 



 
> Date: Tue, 8 Sep 2009 12:32:06 +0530
> Subject: [indiantreepix:17940] Re: Lygodium flexcuosum-climbing fern
> From: sahani...@gmail.com
> To: stephan...@gmail.com
> CC: rashid...@hotmail.com; indian...@googlegroups.com

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