Indian Coral Tree

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Rajesh Sachdev

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Jun 8, 2010, 3:03:13 AM6/8/10
to efloraindia, wildflowerindia
Photographed Indian Coral Tree (Erythrina indica) at Badlapur
(Maharashtra - Western Ghats) in March, 2010.
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Neil Soares

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Jun 8, 2010, 3:20:16 AM6/8/10
to efloraindia, wildflowerindia, Rajesh Sachdev
Hi Rajesh,
   Nice photographs, but they are of Erythrina suberosa.
                   Regards,
                     Neil Soares. 

--- On Tue, 6/8/10, Rajesh Sachdev <leopa...@gmail.com> wrote:
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Rajesh Sachdev

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Jun 8, 2010, 3:26:21 AM6/8/10
to efloraindia
Thanks Neil sir,
I searched on FOI webpage..I am little confused.....pls suggest the actual botanical name of Indian Coral Tree/Corky Coral tree


--
Regards
Rajesh Sachdev

Neil Soares

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Jun 8, 2010, 3:42:28 AM6/8/10
to efloraindia, Rajesh Sachdev
Hi Rajesh,
  Erythrina variegata [previously E.indica] is the Indian Coral Tree and there is one with pure white flowers which is called E.variegata var.alba.
                       Regards,
                         Neil.
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Gurcharan Singh

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Jun 8, 2010, 4:25:49 AM6/8/10
to Neil Soares, efloraindia, Rajesh Sachdev
Yes Neil ji
This plant is E. suberosa now correctly known as E. stricta var. suberosa


-- 
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/ 

tanay bose

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Jun 8, 2010, 7:21:03 AM6/8/10
to Gurcharan Singh, Neil Soares, efloraindia, Rajesh Sachdev
This is indeed  Erythrina stricta var. suberosa! Couple of month ago probably Sir Ji himself uploaded the pictured from Delhi.
Regards
Tanay
Tanay Bose
+91(033) 25550676 (Resi)
9830439691(Mobile)


Ashwin Baindur

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Jun 8, 2010, 9:15:22 PM6/8/10
to efloraindia, Gurcharan Singh, Neil Soares, Rajesh Sachdev, tanay bose
Many of the Coral Blossoms in Pune (and parts of Western India) died due to a viral disease some years ago which left a black sticky residue on the inflorescence and growing tips a yew years ago if I recall correctly. Can somebody shed more light on this?

Warm regards,

Ashwin Baindur
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Col Ashwin Baindur
OIC Corps Archive & Museum, CME, Dapodi Pune 411031
-------------------------------------------
Tel : 020-27147976 (R), Mob : 09923454462
Email: ashwin.baindur(at)gmail.com, ashwin_baindur(at)yahoo.com
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tanay bose

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Jun 8, 2010, 11:19:49 PM6/8/10
to Ashwin Baindur, efloraindia, Gurcharan Singh, Neil Soares, Rajesh Sachdev
Dear Aswin ji ,
I think the symptoms you are talking about is not a Viral Disease , A correspondence was published in Current Science Volume 91, No1, July 2006 by Basavaraj Kore ( P.G Department of Botany,Y.C.I.S, Satara) where he notes down the same symptom observed in Erythrina Sp plant as described by you on examination it was confirmed by him that it was cased by Erythrina gall wasp Quadrastichus erythrinae.
Regards
Tanay

raghu ananth

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Jun 9, 2010, 12:22:29 AM6/9/10
to tanay bose, Ashwin Baindur, efloraindia, Gurcharan Singh, Neil Soares, Rajesh Sachdev
All,

Earlier eflora discussions on Erythrina kinds from India and abroad - being destroyed by pests, foliage deformation, and more (Apr 2008) 


In Mysore district, Erythrina plants are still living with the abnormal swelling of the plant tissues (gall) and every farmer knows it and are waiting for a solution .  The population of these plant  kinds are dwindling away as they are less planted. We hardly see one or two red flowers in the tree. 

Regards
Raghu


2 Phot attachments: 
Date : 11 May 2010
Lakkana koppal- Mullur 

Regards
Raghu



From: tanay bose <tanay...@gmail.com>
To: Ashwin Baindur <ashwin....@gmail.com>
Cc: efloraindia <indian...@googlegroups.com>; Gurcharan Singh <sing...@gmail.com>; Neil Soares <drneil...@yahoo.com>; Rajesh Sachdev <leopa...@gmail.com>
Sent: Wed, 9 June, 2010 8:49:49 AM
Subject: Re: [efloraofindia:37754] Indian Coral Tree
DSC_2455.jpg
DSC_2454b.jpg

tanay bose

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Jun 9, 2010, 8:42:47 AM6/9/10
to raghu ananth, Ashwin Baindur, efloraindia, Gurcharan Singh, Neil Soares, Rajesh Sachdev
Thanks for the photos of the Diseased Plant Raghu Ji
Tanay

Ashwin Baindur

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Jun 9, 2010, 9:17:39 AM6/9/10
to tanay bose, efloraindia, Gurcharan Singh, Neil Soares, Rajesh Sachdev
Hello Tanay ji,

The image shown shows galls - I am familiar with galls. The phenomenon we saw was not galls.

I asked my father-in-law, Mr Nandan Kalbag. He mentioned that he had observed two afflictions. One was a virus disease and the other affliction probably what I referred to was a fungal infection which occurred after heavy infestation by aphids.


Warm regards,

Ashwin Baindur
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Col Ashwin Baindur
OIC Corps Archive & Museum, CME, Dapodi Pune 411031
-------------------------------------------
Tel : 020-27147976 (R), Mob : 09923454462
Email: ashwin.baindur(at)gmail.com, ashwin_baindur(at)yahoo.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gurcharan Singh

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Jun 9, 2010, 9:28:03 AM6/9/10
to Ashwin Baindur, tanay bose, efloraindia, Neil Soares, Rajesh Sachdev
I wonder whether the aphids and fungal mycelium co-exist or it is only the wooly aphis (aphids) known to occur on many trees like apple, pear, elm, silver maple, ash, pine, spruce, hawthorn,  juneberry, etc. The wooly covering of these aphids looks like a fungal mycelium. I remember when we used to pinch this wooly mass, our hands would be full with sticky blood of aphids.


-- 
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/ 

tanay bose

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Jun 9, 2010, 10:18:14 AM6/9/10
to Gurcharan Singh, Ashwin Baindur, efloraindia, Neil Soares, Rajesh Sachdev

Dear Ashwin Ji & Gurcharan ji,

 

It is quite hard to determine a disease without any photographs and information [or very small set of information]. India being a tropical country each and every day new pathogenic varieties develops and devastates plant life. Hence it will be ambiguous to predict without proper sighting of the diseased host.

There are more than 100 reports from all over the world regarding disease of Erythrina sp and about 20 species of the plant has been victimised. As far as you (Ashwin ji) suggest about the symptoms I think there is no possibility of virus infection. Viruses are obligate parasite hence they never tend to show such symptoms where there are no potent tissues left in the plant for it to multiply. Fungi and insect can be brought into consideration in this case.

As said by Gurcharan ji, I will like to tell that aphids and fungus do sometimes co-exist as many times aphids are regarded as the plant disease vectors. Really do some species of aphids shows a woolly mass which may look like fungal mycelium but pathologists are never fooled by such characters because externally developed mycelium generally show saprophytic mode of nutrition . In most of the fungal disease around the world the pathogen develops inter or intra cellularly. Hence aphids can be good choice as they tend to extract nutrition from the living tissue and molt it which may look like the black tar as said by Ashwin Ji.

I can’t confirm regarding the disease extremely sorry for it, only report that I found was in Current Science hence I tried to focus it, without proper disease reports it hard to determine.

I am attaching the pdf copy of the report.

 

Regards,

Tanay

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