Please identify this Toadstool

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Neil Soares

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Oct 28, 2010, 1:12:39 PM10/28/10
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Hi,
 Please identify this Toadstool photographed at my farm at Shahapur last weekend. It measured more than 5 inches in diameter.
                  Thanks,
                               With regards,
                                 Neil Soares.

Toadstool 1.jpg
Toadstool 2.jpg
Toadstool 3.jpg
Toadstool 4.jpg
Toadstool 5.jpg
Toadstool 6.jpg
Toadstool 7.jpg
Toadstool 8.jpg

raghu ananth

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Oct 28, 2010, 2:28:44 PM10/28/10
to Neil Soares, indian...@googlegroups.com
Hi Neil,

Nice picture set of larger mushroom kinds, Am yet to see mushrooms of that size. Toad stool are known to be poisonous and inedible, As always, I wonder, how do farmers learn/test  if a wild  mushroom is edible or not. 

1. One practice I heard, being followed by villagers in Mysore dist.
Cook mushrooms with Brinjal. If the brinjal turns black its inedible. [To be validated]

2. small mushrooms turned blue are inedible

3. Mushrooms growing under certain known trees like saalu dhoopa are consider edible. 
4. The milk (latex) of certain  trees are known to burn the skin. If mushrooms  grow under such trees they are considered inedible. 


Each family in Agumbe pick go mushrooming during the season  and pick upto 3 gunny bags of edible mushrooms in the forests. They then have to consume within 2 days. 


Regards
Raghu
 



From: Neil Soares <drneil...@yahoo.com>
To: indian...@googlegroups.com
Sent: Thu, 28 October, 2010 10:42:39 PM
Subject: [efloraofindia:52250] Please identify this Toadstool

Pankaj Kumar

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Oct 28, 2010, 2:32:35 PM10/28/10
to raghu ananth, Neil Soares, indian...@googlegroups.com
Beautiful pictures....TOADSTOOL, I have never heard that name before....
Thanks for sharing.
Pankaj
--
***********************************************
"TAXONOMISTS GETTING EXTINCT AND SPECIES DATA DEFICIENT !!"


Pankaj Kumar Ph.D. (Orchidaceae)
Research Associate
Greater Kailash Sacred Landscape Project
Department of Habitat Ecology
Wildlife Institute of India
Post Box # 18
Dehradun - 248001, India

Gurcharan Singh

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Oct 28, 2010, 5:51:19 PM10/28/10
to Pankaj Kumar, raghu ananth, Neil Soares, indian...@googlegroups.com
Thanks Raghu ji for interesting details. 

-- 
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/ 

tanay bose

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Oct 28, 2010, 10:33:10 PM10/28/10
to Gurcharan Singh, Pankaj Kumar, raghu ananth, Neil Soares, indian...@googlegroups.com

Dear Neil Ji,

I think this is Amanita pantherina commonly known as ‘panther mushroom”. This is a toxic species. The colour of the cap may vary from dark brown to nearly yellow in colour with small white to creamish warts on the upper-surface of the cap. Other two distinguishing points are volva is rolled like a collar at the base and the stipe is narrowing at the apex and broad at the base. All the character can be observer from your photos. The toxin fond in this mushroom is Muscarine.

         Muscarine binds to some receptors of parasympathetic nervous system

         It does not cross the blood/brain barrier and as such cannot be responsible for any effect on the central nervous system

         It is heat stable

         Lethal dose ranges from 40mg to 180mg

Clinical Symptoms

         Onset of symptoms in 5 – 30 minutes after ingestion of mushroom

         Prespiration

         Salivation

         Lacrimation                     SLUDGE SYNDROME.

         Urination

         Defeacation

         Gastrointestinal distress

         Emesis

         Miosis, Blurred vision

         Intoxication subsides within two hours

         Deaths are rare, but may result from cardiac or respiratory failure in severe cases

Treatment

         Administration of atropine

         Inducing emesis to empty stomach of all mushroom fragments

I will also like to say to Raghu Ji that POINOUS mushrooms have no feature or characters which separate them from edible species. The most common myths regarding poisonous mushrooms are

         Having bright, flashy colours (some very toxic species are pure white)

         Poisonous mushrooms smell and taste horrible (Some taste delicious, reported by victims)

         Tarnishes silver spoons when touched (Amanita phalloides does not blacken silver)

         Lack of snail or insect infestations (a mushroom might be harmless to invertebrates, but could be toxic to humans)

         Any mushroom becomes safe for eating, if cooked enough (the chemical nature of some toxins are very stable, even at high temperature)

THIS IS A GENERAL RECOMMENDATION ………………….

 

         Identify every mushroom collected in the field before consumption

         Strictly avoid any mushrooms which look like Amanita, little brown mushrooms and false morales.

         Some people are allergic to the safest mushrooms. The first time you try a new wild mushroom, try it in a small amount and wait for a day before eating more

         As with other foods, rotting mushrooms can make you ill. Eat only fresh mushrooms

         Most wild mushrooms should not be eaten raw, since they are difficult to digest. They should be well cooked before consumption as it will destroy the heat labile toxins present in them.

         Alcohol consumption should be avoided when eating previously untried wild mushrooms

There are no simply guidelines to identify poisonous mushrooms. A common rule followed by mushroom hunters is:

WHEN IN DOUBT THROW IT OUT!! 

Regards

Tanay

--
Tanay Bose
Research Assistant & Teaching Assistant.
Department of Botany.
University of British Columbia .
3529-6270 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4 (Canada)
Phone: 778-323-4036 (Mobile)
            604-822-2019 (Lab)

Neil Soares

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Oct 28, 2010, 11:05:53 PM10/28/10
to Gurcharan Singh, tanay bose, Pankaj Kumar, raghu ananth, indian...@googlegroups.com

 

Thanks Tanay for the id and the long and detailed explanation. Rest assured I had no intention of eating it !

 

My thanks also to Raghu, Prof. Singh & Dr. Pankaj for their inputs.

 

As far as I remember – fungii that bear a cap & a stalk are called ‘mushrooms’. Poisonous mushrooms are called ‘Toadstools’.

 

                                    Regards,

                                      Neil Soares.

--- On Fri, 10/29/10, tanay bose <tanay...@gmail.com> wrote:

raghu ananth

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Oct 28, 2010, 11:34:17 PM10/28/10
to Neil Soares, Gurcharan Singh, tanay bose, Pankaj Kumar, indian...@googlegroups.com

Toadstool is the common name for an inedible or poisonous mushrooms in some countries.  Mushroom experts/communities discourage the usage of this particular word as there is no scientific classification/description.

This means - a wild mushroom or a wild toadstool could be poisonous.


Thanks / Regards
Raghu

From: Neil Soares <drneil...@yahoo.com>
To: Gurcharan Singh <sing...@gmail.com>; tanay bose <tanay...@gmail.com>
Cc: Pankaj Kumar <sahani...@gmail.com>; raghu ananth <ragh...@yahoo.com>; indian...@googlegroups.com
Sent: Fri, 29 October, 2010 8:35:53 AM

Subject: Re: [efloraofindia:52291] Please identify this Toadstool

 

Thanks Tanay for the id and the long and detailed explanation. Rest assured I had no intention of eating it !

tanay bose

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Oct 29, 2010, 12:04:41 AM10/29/10
to raghu ananth, Neil Soares, Gurcharan Singh, Pankaj Kumar, indian...@googlegroups.com
Hi Neil Ji,
Mushroom is a very broad term used to describe macroscopic sporulating bodies belonging to higher group of fungi i.e Basidiomycota and Ascomycota, though the members from both the phylum doen't essentially have such fruit bodies. Members from Basidiomycota are known to have the cap (pileus) and stalk ( stipe) but there are many exception such as genus Auricularia , Tremella e.tc which lacks caps and stalk. Members from Ascomycota never have stalk and cap. Kindly take a look at the links below.........
 
 
Regards
Tanay

mani nair

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Oct 29, 2010, 12:21:16 AM10/29/10
to tanay bose, raghu ananth, Neil Soares, Gurcharan Singh, Pankaj Kumar, indian...@googlegroups.com
Dear Raghu ji, thanks for the info.  In Kerala I have seen mushrooms growing under Tamarind Trees.  Are they edible?

Regards,

Mani.

Gurcharan Singh

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Oct 29, 2010, 1:26:35 AM10/29/10
to mani nair, tanay bose, raghu ananth, Neil Soares, Pankaj Kumar, indian...@googlegroups.com
Dear Tanay
We used to eat a lot of fleshy fungi (not to say just mushrooms) in childhood days collected from woods especially after a thunderburst when they come out of ground, much before we started going to College, and trust me never fell ill. May be we could identify edible fungi which we called Kan dolle (looked like and had texture of ear- now as botanist we know as Sarcosphaera), Guchhi (Morchella esculenta) and Khumb (Agaricus bisporus). On one occasion I happen to collect one button mushroom that was large enough to provide one cup full of cooked vegetable.

-- 
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/ 

raghu ananth

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Oct 29, 2010, 1:40:26 AM10/29/10
to mani nair, tanay bose, Neil Soares, Gurcharan Singh, Pankaj Kumar, indian...@googlegroups.com
Mushrooms are known to form a symbiotic relationship with certain tree roots.
I have seen only green grass growing under tamarind trees after rains. 

A local true mushroom expert should definitely help on most of the edible kinds of your region. The edible  knowledge is passed on from generations and they know the harmful/harmless kinds well and tried many times. 

Alternate,
get the mushroom identified first  by mushroom communities/research labs/horticulture dept. know the chemicals and learn if it can be devoured.


Regards
Raghu








From: mani nair <mani....@gmail.com>
To: tanay bose <tanay...@gmail.com>
Cc: raghu ananth <ragh...@yahoo.com>; Neil Soares <drneil...@yahoo.com>; Gurcharan Singh <sing...@gmail.com>; Pankaj Kumar <sahani...@gmail.com>; indian...@googlegroups.com
Sent: Fri, 29 October, 2010 9:51:16 AM
Subject: Re: [efloraofindia:52316] Please identify this Toadstool

tanay bose

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Oct 29, 2010, 10:15:58 AM10/29/10
to raghu ananth, mani nair, Neil Soares, Gurcharan Singh, Pankaj Kumar, indian...@googlegroups.com
Dear Sir Ji,
I accept that wild mushroom are best to taste as I do taste then regularly out here. but identifying mushrooms are skills by itself. I know many people who may not have degrees like us but are master in this. I admire there knowledge, but i never take this risk.

Regards
Tanay

hari lal

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Oct 29, 2010, 1:07:32 PM10/29/10
to Neil Soares, indian...@googlegroups.com
i think it is amanita sps if in matured it become red or orange yellow
Hari Shankar Lal
Vinoba Bhave University
Hazaribag

Pankaj Kumar

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Oct 29, 2010, 3:03:19 PM10/29/10
to hari lal, Neil Soares, indian...@googlegroups.com
Dont tell me its you...... Nice to see you here Hari..
Thanks for the id.

Keep posting. Do post some Jharkhand plant pics....
Pankaj

--

Yazdy Palia

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Oct 30, 2010, 5:11:28 AM10/30/10
to Gurcharan Singh, mani nair, tanay bose, raghu ananth, Neil Soares, Pankaj Kumar, indian...@googlegroups.com
Yes De. Gurcharan Singh Ji, I enjoy quite a few varieties of mushrooms. The safest way I find is to ask the tribals. They eat many more varieties than the other local people who have migrated from other areas. I have enjoyed so many mushrooms that are considered non edible by most of the other local people and nothing has happened to me.
Regards
Yazdy.

JM Garg

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Apr 22, 2020, 5:46:58 AM4/22/20
to efloraofindia, Suhaib Yatoo, Ashutosh Sharma, Neil Soares
Toadstool 1.jpg
Toadstool 2.jpg
Toadstool 3.jpg
Toadstool 4.jpg
Toadstool 5.jpg
Toadstool 6.jpg
Toadstool 7.jpg
Toadstool 8.jpg

Suhaib Yatoo

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Apr 22, 2020, 7:45:50 AM4/22/20
to J.M. Garg, Ashutosh Sharma, efloraindia, Neil Soares

Clarkeinda trachodes(please check the spellings)

J.M. Garg

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Apr 22, 2020, 8:49:14 AM4/22/20
to Suhaib Yatoo, Ashutosh Sharma, efloraindia, Neil Soares
Thanks a lot, Suhaib ji.
--
With regards,
J.M.Garg

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