Any research on this among the group?

11 views
Skip to first unread message

Marianne de Nazareth

unread,
Aug 1, 2010, 7:48:37 AM8/1/10
to indiantreepix
 
Dear all,
 
 
"Invasive plants can affect community structure and
ecosystem processes in various ways. One of the ways in which an invasive
plant can impact ecosystem functioning is by disrupting native
plant-pollinator interactions,." says a researcher from Bangalore.
 
Recently I have seen a massive growth of an invasive plant Lantana camara in Hoskote on the outskirts of Bangalore. Does any one in the group have any research findings that can bind this explosion of the Lantana to Climate Change. I am interested in working a story on this but I do not have scientific proof to support this phenomenon.
 
regds,
 
Marianne

--
Fellow with UNFCCC, UNEP & Robert Bosch Stiftung
Former Asst Editor- The Deccan Herald
Freelance Journalist
Adjunct faculty St. Joseph's College & COMMITS
http://mariannedenazareth.blogspot.com/



Smilax004

unread,
Aug 1, 2010, 8:49:47 AM8/1/10
to efloraofindia
Hi,

To understand what effect invasive plants on the local community, I
think, one has to know what was/is the community organisations of
plants existing in our natural habitats. Now people are looking at the
similar habitats or places nearby. But imagine things such as climate
change might have influence on the whole system/community.

We have a habit of starting research works when some visual influence
on the community (defined/undefined?) is seen just as that of climate
change as the hot topic now. No body can say what was the scenario in
a specific area prior to such changes.

When we would have a solid data on the community organisation of flora
or fauna in natural habitats?
Taxonomic works on plants are not going beyond the systematics of
plants.
When will we study the ecology, distribution, reproductive biology and
threats of each species/population/community?
Why no PhD problems are coming up with utmost seriousness with respect
to the real scenarios in the field other than very few serious works
from here and there out of thousands produced every year?

Without knowing the community structure/organisation/species
composition of any natural habitat, how can we say that 'something' is
the result of invasion or climate change?

Dear Marianne, I would suggest Mr. Bharath Sundaram, who works on
Lantana invasion in BRT sanctuary in Karnataka as his PhD thesis
problem, for further queries. You can contact him at
<bha...@atree.org>


Regards,
Giby




On Aug 1, 4:48 pm, Marianne de Nazareth <mde.nazar...@gmail.com>
wrote:

Pankaj Kumar

unread,
Aug 1, 2010, 9:07:55 AM8/1/10
to Smilax004, efloraofindia
Dr. Hiten Padalia may be one guy who can be of some help. He is a
Scientist at IIRS, Dehradun, who was working on some project on
Lantana in Rajaji National Park.
hite...@yahoo.co.in
Hope he responds. You may use my reference.
Dr. Pankaj Kumar, WII

Satya Prakash

unread,
Aug 1, 2010, 9:17:35 AM8/1/10
to Marianne de Nazareth, indiantreepix
Hi,

Though research studies are needed at large on the impacts of invasive species on local/ native flora but here you could find few examples to carry out work on this aspect.

First, Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur, Rajasthan, India
We all know about the world heritage site wher Prosopis juliflora was dominant invasive species along with Water Hyacinth. In 2007, KNP Forest Department started uprooting of this invasive species. The earlier species are well documented in the work of Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS), Mumbai. Today one could see the revival of native flora specially Salvadora & Acacia spp.

You can compare the flora before invasion of Prosopis juliflora, at the time of P. juliflora and after its removal. Research work could be referenced in your work which is readily available with KNP Forest Department &/or BNHS.

Second, Mount Abu Wildlife Sanctuary, Sirohi, Rajasthan, India
Here you could find the well documented literature on plantation of exotic species specially Eucalyptus and Lantana. Though studies on impact of plantation of these species are lacking but on the basis of the availability of the herbs (which are mainly collected by local people from very past) could be assessed.

Will give you one example of the impact - Species of Carrissa, Rosa and many aquatic species of medicinal value were now no more to see on the table land of the Abu Hills which were once common on this part of hills. Human settlements are mainly on this table land. Further, expansion of the Lantana is taking place through out the hills. Seeds of Lantana are dispersed by the droppings of Bulbul (very common bird) and Sloth Bear (common mammal) in core areas of hills.

The aquatic bodies (pictures from archives) which were once full of local vegetation are now either dried or even lost their existence. One could easily see monoculture Eucalyptus in those aquatic bodies.

Regards

Satya Prakash Mehra
Advisor - RSNH & Manger - Project Boond
Rajasthan, India

--- On Sun, 1/8/10, Marianne de Nazareth <mde.na...@gmail.com> wrote:

Pankaj Oudhia

unread,
Aug 1, 2010, 9:57:36 AM8/1/10
to efloraofindia

Marianne de Nazareth

unread,
Aug 2, 2010, 12:16:05 AM8/2/10
to Satya Prakash, indiantreepix
Thank you so much for this. The second example will help me a lot.
 
However I still have the question to answer, is there a connection with the spread of Lantana due to Climate Change?
 
regds,
 
Marianne 

Rashida Atthar

unread,
Aug 2, 2010, 4:10:51 AM8/2/10
to Marianne de Nazareth, Satya Prakash, indiantreepix
Hi Marianne,

Marianne ji if I understood correctly you want  to know if there is spread of Lantana due to climate change.?  Commensensically, I  would think such a research would at a minimum take two to five years with intensive observations pre and post Lantana plantations,  carried out  by an expert team. Only than would some conclusions, that too relevant for that particular climate zone be possible.( All scientists have not even agreed that there is climate change !!) 

If I was in your place, I would attempt a compilation of  all the studies done so far by researchers and highlight the methods used and their findings, and also their implementation if any. This would probably give some direction for further studies and what needs to be done and how. Perhaps take local observations of farmers and those who are knowledgeable about nature to make it more representative. 

regards,
Rashida.   

Sid

unread,
Aug 2, 2010, 4:26:02 AM8/2/10
to indiantreepix
Climate change or not, I really want this Lanata eradicated from our forests. As Rashida ji pointed out, not all can agree there is a climate change now. But if we keep on polluting the earth at this pace, we would face a "climate" change sooner than later. So it is better to create an awareness among people. Regarding Lantana, our government must do something seriously, like spending money on manpower to cut them periodically. We can invent special tools to easily and selectively cut this weed. They should also educate children / villagers about this invasive weed so that they can do everything in their ability to control this abnoxious weed. To look for a biological control solution will take lots and lots of research input, though its not impossible. Anyway, its great that Marianne ji is thinking of popularizing the problem caused by Lantana.

regards,
Siddhu.

Satya Prakash

unread,
Aug 2, 2010, 6:04:00 AM8/2/10
to indiantreepix, Marianne de Nazareth, Rashida Atthar

Hi Friends,

I agree with Rashida ji. It requires a long observations and scientific research for concluding the effect Climate Change on Lantana spreading.

Now, as far as my knowledge concerned (let me tell you I am not botanist or plant specialist) Lantana invasions are associated with habitat disturbance and readily grows well on nutrient barren soils but requires open canopy for sunlight. For germination its seed requires warm and humid conditions. Once established, the plants are heat- and drought- tolerant. Further, shoots are frost sensitive & growth is reduced below 5˚C and roots do not accept waterlogged conditions.

There are ample of references supporting these characteristics.

With reference to Abu Hills I could only state that it was introduced in 1890s as ornamental plant by Princely family of Alwar in their garden. Mt Abu is Eco-fragile zone notified as Eco-Sensitive Zone recently. The conditions (habitat & climatic) were worsened from late 1980s (as per my knowledge/ work on Abu Hills). Meteorological data are there to show the changes in rainfall pattern and temperature on Abu Hills. The waterlogging conditions were no more to see and forget about the extreme cold conditions on Abu which were common for residents in the past (before 1990s).

Approx. 90 species of Bryophytes were reported from Abu Hills. One has to find out what’s the number in the present conditions? As far as my knowledge concerned, one could only find around 40-50 species at present.

This could be the basis of your work to start up to work in direction of climate change and invasions of Lantana on Abu Hills.

Still, I strongly favor the scientific studies are demand of time on Abu Hills to conclude the reasons related to climate change. 


Regards

Satya Prakash Mehra


--- On Mon, 2/8/10, Rashida Atthar <atthar....@gmail.com> wrote:

Pankaj Kumar

unread,
Aug 2, 2010, 6:16:23 AM8/2/10
to Satya Prakash, indiantreepix, Marianne de Nazareth, Rashida Atthar
GIS approach should be one of the best way to predict how invasion of Lantana affects the indigenous vegetation.
 
Yes there is a connection with climate change and lantana invasion. One of the most important being the seeds of Lantana dont germinate in cold temperatures like that of higher altitudes and sometimes they may also get killed by frost or snow. Hence as the temperature gets warmer, Lantana tends to shift upwards in elevation and hence disrupts the natural vegetation in the area.
one of the best experiments would be to try growing Lantana at different elevations in different temperature zones. Just checking Lantana seed germinaation in labs at different controlled temperature would give good results.
 
Dear Mr. Satya Prakash, depletion in bryophyte richness in the area may not be caused due to lantana or climate change but for one basic reason and that is air pollution. Presence of Lantana does show allelopathic affect on the natural vegetation.
 
Regards
Pankaj

Satya Prakash

unread,
Aug 2, 2010, 6:18:48 AM8/2/10
to indiantreepix, Sid
Dear Sidhu ji,

Eradication of Lantana is must and lot of work is going on in this direction throughout the Globe as it is among the world's ten most worst invasive species harming native flora.

But we have to keep several points in mind before eradicating it. On the basis of my studies on birds on Abu Hills, I found that many birds had adapted Lanatan bushes as there nesting/ roosting/ resting place. Before eradicating the bushes, we have to provide alternative or past habitat conditions to such fauna.

I will quote one example in this direction:
Every year Forest Department starts campaign to clean the area from Lantana on Abu Hills. When I was there, I found one endemic subtaxa of bird (Tawny-bellied Babbler Dumetia hyperythra abuensis) was habituated to live in the bushes at that site and could be easily seen. In the program of cleaning the sites, the bushes were burnt and area was made clear. Now, think what happened to the bird which is important for the birders to come and sight....... This was the sight which was accessible to every persons. We use to take youngsters to sight this species but now we have to go somewhat deep inside the forest treks to sight the species.

Similalry, Grey Jungle Fowl has made this plant species a very good hiding place. It is not possible for poachers to access inside these bushes easily. If the areas are cleared rampantly what will happen to the species hide.....

One of the Globally Threatened bird species is well adapted to Lanatana bushes.

Our suggestion is to plant or provide space for the native bushes to come up before cleaning or opening the surface from Lanatana bushes so that many faunal species which adapted to find their place in these bushes could not be harmed.

Regards

Satya Prakash Mehra
Rajputana Society of Natural History (RSNH)
Rajasthan, India



--- On Mon, 2/8/10, Sid <sid...@gmail.com> wrote:

Satya Prakash

unread,
Aug 2, 2010, 6:37:07 AM8/2/10
to Pankaj Kumar, indiantreepix, Marianne de Nazareth, Rashida Atthar
Dear Dr Pankaj ji,

You are right, I had just given information to state the changes in conditions of Abu Hills. So please don't relate it with either climate change or lantana.

Regards

Satya Prakash Mehra

--- On Mon, 2/8/10, Pankaj Kumar <sahani...@gmail.com> wrote:

Pankaj Kumar

unread,
Aug 2, 2010, 6:40:10 AM8/2/10
to Satya Prakash, indiantreepix, Marianne de Nazareth, Rashida Atthar
Dear Mr. Satya,
I am sorry, I think I misinterpreted.
Regards
Pankaj
 

Rashida Atthar

unread,
Aug 3, 2010, 2:04:07 AM8/3/10
to Pankaj Kumar, Satya Prakash, indiantreepix, Marianne de Nazareth
Wonderful inputs Satya Prakash ji and Siddhu ji. Satya ji  your studies and observations are very important and relevant and  should give good directions to Marianne ji's article. All the best.

regards,
Rashida.
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages