3-lobed tiny fruited sub-shrub

11 views
Skip to first unread message

Dinesh Valke

unread,
Jan 15, 2009, 9:54:59 AM1/15/09
to Indian Tree Pix

Hello friends,

I have been noticing this plant at Yeoor Hills, Sanjay Gandhi National Park, Tungareshwar Wildlife Sanctuary, Karnala Bird Sanctuary since after monsoon.
I do not see them in urban area.

Looks like sub-shrub, growing under large trees or even along trails, height of 50 - 75 cms.
Basal leaves are quite large; they look beautiful with large and soft serrated margin, in fact the locals call it katri in Marathi (कातरी).
Katri means indented, serrated, saw-edged; besides it also means a (small) pair of scissors.

The fruit looks like a tiny brinjal, 3 clear lobes can be made out, about 12 - 15 mm.
Not used as vegetable.
 
... any clue / OR ID of this plant ?

Regards.

3-lobed_fruit.jpg
3-lobed_fruit_FLOWER.jpg
3-lobed_fruit_INFORESCENCE.jpg
3-lobed_fruit_PLANT.jpg

Barry Stock

unread,
Jan 15, 2009, 10:27:57 AM1/15/09
to Dinesh Valke, Indian Tree Pix
Looks like a Solanaceae spp.

-bs
> <3-lobed_fruit.jpg><3-lobed_fruit_FLOWER.jpg><3-
> lobed_fruit_INFORESCENCE.jpg><3-lobed_fruit_PLANT.jpg>

Mahadeswara Swamy

unread,
Jan 16, 2009, 2:00:18 AM1/16/09
to Indian Tree Pix, Dinesh Valke
One of the Euphorbiaceae member.


--- On Thu, 15/1/09, Dinesh Valke <dinesh...@gmail.com> wrote:

> From: Dinesh Valke <dinesh...@gmail.com>
> Subject: [indiantreepix:7608] 3-lobed tiny fruited sub-shrub
> To: "Indian Tree Pix" <indian...@googlegroups.com>
> Date: Thursday, 15 January, 2009, 8:24 PM
> Hello friends,
>
> I have been noticing this plant at Yeoor Hills, Sanjay
> Gandhi National Park,
> Tungareshwar Wildlife Sanctuary, Karnala Bird Sanctuary
> since after monsoon.
> I do not see them in urban area.
>
> Looks like sub-shrub, growing under large trees or even
> along trails, height
> of 50 - 75 cms.
> Basal leaves are quite large; they look beautiful with
> large and soft
> serrated margin, in fact the locals call it *katri* in
> Marathi (कातरी).
> *Katri* means indented, serrated, saw-edged; besides it
> also means a (small)
> pair of scissors.
> The fruit looks like a tiny brinjal, 3 clear lobes can be
> made out, about 12
> - 15 mm.
> Not used as vegetable.
>
> ... any clue / OR ID of this plant ?
>
> Regards.
>
>

Get perfect Email ID for your Resume. Grab now http://in.promos.yahoo.com/address

Nayan Singh

unread,
Jan 17, 2009, 4:32:05 AM1/17/09
to Dinesh Valke, Indian Tree Pix
looks like Baliospermum montanum from Euphorbiaceae
Cheers
 
N.S.Dungriyal IFS
Chief Conservator of Forests
and Field Director
Satpura Tiger Reserve Hoshangabad
M.P.
09424792100



From: Dinesh Valke <dinesh...@gmail.com>

To: Indian Tree Pix <indian...@googlegroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, 15 January, 2009 8:24:59 PM

Subject: [indiantreepix:7608] 3-lobed tiny fruited sub-shrub

Get perfect Email ID for your Resume. Get before others grab.

Dinesh Valke

unread,
Jan 17, 2009, 8:43:04 AM1/17/09
to Nayan Singh, Indian Tree Pix
Nayan ji, thank you very much for the important clue.
It sure looks like some Jatropha ... J. montana is synonym of B. montanum
 
Some of my concerns:
1) B. montanum grows as tall as 1.5 m ... http://ayurvedicmedicinalplants.com/plants/82.html
2) of B. montanum, the leaves stay drooping (hang), whereas the plant in photo has its leaves stay risen, at the most recurve
3) the venations and margins
 
I will work towards gathering information.
 
Many thanks to all.
Regards.

Dinesh Valke

unread,
Jan 30, 2009, 12:59:09 AM1/30/09
to Nayan Singh, Indian Tree Pix, Barry Stock, drnarasi...@gmail.com
Nayan ji, thanks a lot for this identification ... I took some time to be back on this ... frankly, I was trying to find other Baliospermum species and their distribution, especially in the Western Ghats.
The search results however pointed out that B. axillare and B. solanifolium are but synonyms of B. montanum.
 
A link I referred: http://envis.frlht.org.in/bmontanum.htm at ENVIS - FRLHT
(the illustration on the web page seems to me, erroneous)
 
 
Thanks to Narsimha ji too, for seconding the identification.
 
Barry, your hunch that it could be a Solanaceae member was not altogether wrong; in fact, the fruit looks so much like a tiny brinjal, that I too was considering it to be a species from Solanaceae family.
B. solanifolium supports !!
 
Regards to all.
 


 
On Sat, Jan 17, 2009 at 3:02 PM, Nayan Singh <ns_dun...@yahoo.co.in> wrote:
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages