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Thiruvengadam Ekambaram

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Aug 13, 2010, 3:23:18 AM8/13/10
to indiantreepix
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I took this flower picture in Bhojwasa, Uttarakhand
Date/Time-8.7.10 ----1.05 p.m.
Location- Place, Altitude, GPS- --- in Bhojwasa 4 km from Gaumukh
Habitat- Garden/ Urban/ Wild/ Type- ----wild
Plant Habit- Tree/ Shrub/ Climber/ Herb- --- Shrub
Height/Length- -----Around 0.5 me
Leaves Type/ Shape/ Size -------as seen in the picture
Inflorescence Type/ Size-
Flowers Size/ Colour/ Calyx/ Bracts- --- As seen in the photo, Flash
not used. Colour is reproduced faithfully. Camera --Cannon, S3 IS
Fruits Type/ Shape/ Size Seeds-
Please give ID
With Warm Regards,

E.Thiruvengadam
Mobile 09987886892
Chembur, Mumbai - 400074

IMG_1170.JPG

Gurcharan Singh

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Aug 13, 2010, 3:55:21 AM8/13/10
to Thiruvengadam Ekambaram, indiantreepix
Thymus serpyllum, the Wild thyme
Hindi: Banajwain
Punjab: Kalandar zatar, Marizha, Masho
Shakei


-- 
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/ 

nabha meghani

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Aug 13, 2010, 6:30:15 AM8/13/10
to Gurcharan Singh, Thiruvengadam Ekambaram, indiantreepix
indeed.
a mediterranean herb, used in all dishes like Pizza, Pasta etc.
Tea against cough.
 
I was under the impression, that it is mainly found wild in warmer regions like mediterranean countries. Surprise, surprise that Thiru ji took the foto in Bhojwasa, Uttarakhand.
 
Regards
Nalini

 
 
----- Original Message -----

Pankaj Kumar

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Aug 13, 2010, 6:35:33 AM8/13/10
to nabha meghani, Gurcharan Singh, Thiruvengadam Ekambaram, indiantreepix
I think this is very common above 2000m in Uttarakhand, but didnt know
that it was used as spice. We use Trachyspermum copticum, as ajwain.

Wikipedia says: It is a source of oil of Serpolet by distillation, and
is used as an aphrodisiac in herbal medicine. It is also used against
coughing.

Regards
Pankaj

Tabish

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Aug 13, 2010, 7:50:47 AM8/13/10
to efloraofindia
Shouldn't this be the Himalayan species, Thymus linearis?
With the present image, one can't say anything for sure.
- Tabish

On Aug 13, 12:55 pm, Gurcharan Singh <singh...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Thymus serpyllum, the Wild thyme
> Hindi: Banajwain
> Punjab: Kalandar zatar, Marizha, Masho
> Shakei
>
> --
> Dr. Gurcharan Singh
> Retired  Associate Professor
> SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
> Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
> Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/
>
> On Fri, Aug 13, 2010 at 12:53 PM, Thiruvengadam Ekambaram <
>

nabha meghani

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Aug 13, 2010, 8:08:26 AM8/13/10
to Pankaj Kumar, Gurcharan Singh, Thiruvengadam Ekambaram, indiantreepix
In mediterranean kitchen dried leaves and flowers are used, e.g. with
tomato and zucchini dishes and naturally for pizza.
one can't imagine pizza without thymian.

The google-translation of german wiki-quote:
The sand-Thyme is scattered to rarely used as an ornamental in rock gardens,
borders and natural gardens in sandy areas in heath gardens. There are
several varieties.
The dried plant (Latin Serpylli herba) is used as drug officinal
application. As the ingredients terpenes carvacrol and thymol were found. On
the basis of which the drug is usually prepared as an infusion is used
against catarrh of the upper respiratory tract.

In fact ajwain (seeds) I know from india, not from europe. Is ajwain
natural seeds of Thymian or are the seeds treated somehow to make ajwan.
Interestingly someone in indian shop told me that ajwan are seeds from
Liebst�ckel Levisticum officinale. and german wiki says that the dried seeds
of Liebst�ckel are used in the kitchen.
Experts may comment on this

nabha meghani

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Aug 13, 2010, 8:15:51 AM8/13/10
to Tabish, efloraofindia
in that case ajwain is correct.
without leaves, difficult to determine

Thiruvengadam Ekambaram

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Aug 13, 2010, 8:16:34 AM8/13/10
to Tabish, efloraofindia
Madam/Sir
I attached an edited/cropped photo of the same for analysis

--
With Warm Regards,
   
E.Thiruvengadam, FIE
Life Fellow
The Institution of Engineers (India)
Chartered Engineer (India)
Mobile 09987886892
Chembur, Mumbai
IMG_1170a.jpg

Gurcharan Singh

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Aug 13, 2010, 9:03:06 AM8/13/10
to Thiruvengadam Ekambaram, Tabish, efloraofindia
Tabish ji
You are right. The Himalayan thyme is now known as T. linearis. It, however, does not change its utility and importance as thyme. It grows very commonly on exposed sunny slopes and when partially fruiting one can feel the smell of ajwain from a great distance. Up to 1982 or so the species was known under T. serpyllum.


-- 
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/ 

tanay bose

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Aug 13, 2010, 12:07:32 PM8/13/10
to Gurcharan Singh, Thiruvengadam Ekambaram, Tabish, efloraofindia
Tabish Ji is right this is Himalayan thyme I have seen this in gangtok and have the herbarium back in India
Tanay

--
Tanay Bose
Research Assistant & Teaching Assistant
Department of Botany
University of British Columbia
3529-6270 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4 (Canada)
Phone: 778-323-4036

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