Palmyra palm & strangler figs

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raghu ananth

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Oct 28, 2009, 1:59:18 PM10/28/09
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At Kattupalli beach, near chennai, tall palm trees (Palmyra palm, Borassus flabellifer), casuarina & cashew nut are found growing in abundance and are the only greenery on this rather stark landscape. The sand dunes are spread all over like a smooth, white undulating carpet. 
 
We could see a number palm trees strangled (atleast 50) by fig trees. In fact, all of the supporting palm trees were still alive & strong !
 
 
Kattupalli village / beach,
Near Chennai
Aug 15, 2009
 
Regards
Raghu
 
 

 


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lavkumar khachar

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Oct 28, 2009, 9:16:35 PM10/28/09
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Friends,

This is a very interesting observation.....the palm trees being 'alive and strong'. Normally the supporting host would indeed die. The explanation to my understanding is that if the host is a dicot, then it dies because the trunk cannot develop because the cambium is all on the outer rim of the trunk just below the bark while in monocots to which the palm belongs, the cambium is in bundles inside the body of the trunk. However, in the end, the palm would die when the strangler fig becomes fully established and cuts out all air flow to the palm trunk.

Lavkumar Khachar.

Nudrat

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Oct 29, 2009, 8:06:44 AM10/29/09
to indiantreepix
Hello,

The process of ficus strangling the host tree is very slow one and may
sometimes take more than 100 yrs as the plant in actual just takes
support from its host.

On Oct 29, 6:16 am, lavkumar khachar <lavkumarkhac...@gmail.com>
wrote:
> Friends,
>
> This is a very interesting observation.....the palm trees being 'alive and
> strong'. Normally the supporting host would indeed die. The explanation to
> my understanding is that if the host is a dicot, then it dies because the
> trunk cannot develop because the cambium is all on the outer rim of the
> trunk just below the bark while in monocots to which the palm belongs, the
> cambium is in bundles inside the body of the trunk. However, in the end, the
> palm would die when the strangler fig becomes fully established and cuts out
> all air flow to the palm trunk.
>
> Lavkumar Khachar.
>
> On Wed, Oct 28, 2009 at 11:29 PM, raghu ananth <raghu_...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > At Kattupalli beach, near chennai, tall palm trees (Palmyra palm, Borassus
> > flabellifer), casuarina & cashew nut are found growing in abundance and are
> > the only greenery on this rather stark landscape. The sand dunes are spread
> > all over like a smooth, white undulating carpet.
>
> > We could see a number palm trees strangled (atleast 50) by fig trees. In
> > fact, all of the supporting palm trees were still alive & strong !
>
> > Kattupalli village / beach,
> > Near Chennai
> > Aug 15, 2009
>
> > Regards
> > Raghu
>
> > ------------------------------
> > Connect more, do more and share more with Yahoo! India Mail. Learn more<http://in.rd.yahoo.com/tagline_galaxy_3/*http://in.overview.mail.yaho...>
> > .

kvs

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Oct 29, 2009, 9:07:57 AM10/29/09
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Hello,
In the Guindy National Park in Chennai I have seen many palmyra palms
being strangled by fig trees. But in all cases the palm trees seemed
to be alive and alright. I suppose that these trees have been
strangled only recently.It will be interesting to know what birds
occur at Kattupalli.Because birds are supposed to play a part in
distributing the seeds after eating the figs.

Regards,
K V Sudhakar

Nudrat

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Oct 30, 2009, 12:52:17 AM10/30/09
to indiantreepix
Hello,

All Ficus species are considered to be keystone species as they
provide food to a variety of animals during lean season so i dont
think there must be any particular species of bird that may be
responsible for distribution of the seeds.
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