*TOO FANTASTICAL*

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Arthur Neuendorffer

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Jul 29, 2021, 6:19:56 PMJul 29
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-------------------------------------------------------
Archbishop of Canterbury (1583-1603) John WHITgift
founds WHITgift School in cROYDON (1596).
(1597 was the 1000th anniversary of Christianity in England.)

Archbishop WHITgift died on February 29th 1603/4
[Exactly one century after Columbus used a lunar eclipse
. to frighten hostile Jamaican Indians!]

WHITgift formed a committee to censor plays in 1589;
. later had Queen Elizabeth issue a proclamation
. against *fiddamatorie and FANTASTICALL* writings!
--------------------------------------------------------
. . . Willobie his Avisa (1594) Cant. XLIIII
. . . Henrico Willobego. Italo-Hispalensis.

<<H.W. being sodenly infected with the contagion
of a *FANTASTICALL FIT* , at the first sight of *A*,
--------------------------------------------------------
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/10800/10800-h/ampart3.html

. The Preface of "The Anatomy of Melancholy" (1621) Burton

<<There will not be wanting, I presume, one or other that will much
discommend some part of this treatise of love-melancholy, and object
that it is too light for a divine, too comical a subject to speak of
love symptoms, *TOO FANTASTICAL*, and fit alone for a wanton poet,
a feeling young lovesick gallant, an effeminate courtier,
or some such *IDLE* person.>>
------------------------------------------------------
D. Roper's _Shakespeare, to be or not to be_ p.42

<<Lady MANNERS thought Southampton *TOO FANTASTICAL*>>
[i.e., Elizabeth Sidney (daughter of Sir Philip Sidney)]
--------------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Manners,_5th_Earl_of_Rutland

<<Roger Manners, 5th Earl of Rutland (6 October 1576 – 26 June 1612)
was the son of John Manners, 4th Earl of Rutland. He married Elizabeth
Sidney (daughter of Sir Philip Sidney and stepdaughter of Robert
Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex), on 5 March 1599. He died in 1612,
aged 35 and his titles passed to his brother, Francis Manners.

He was a student at Oxford and Cambridge, Gray's Inn, and University
of Padua, Italy. He travelled across Europe, took part in military
campaigns led by Essex, and was a participant of Essex's rebellion
against Queen Elizabeth I. He was favoured by James I, and honoured
by his contemporaries as a man of great intelligence & talent. He
enjoyed the friendship of some of the most prominent writers and
artists of the Elizabethan-Jacobean age. In 1602 he led an Embassy to
Denmark, homeland of James' Queen Anne of Denmark. Evidence indicates
that the Earl was a patron of Inigo Jones and probably introduced
Jones to the Court of James I and Anne of Denmark, where Jones had
his impact as both an architect and a designer of Court masques.

Roger Manners (and his wife Elizabeth Sidney, daughter of the poet
Philip Sidney) are believed by some to be candidates for the author
of Shakespeare's literary work in the Shakespearean authorship
question. Karl Bleibtreu & Celestin Demblon supported this idea.>>
----------------------------------------------------------
. . . Episode 9 - Scylla and Charybdis

—Well, in that case, he said, I don’t see why you should expect payment for it
since you don’t believe it yourself. Dowden believes there is some mystery in Hamlet
but will say no more. Herr Bleibtreu, the man Piper met in Berlin, who is working up
that Rutland theory, believes that the secret is hidden in the Stratford monument.
He is going to visit the present duke, Piper says, and prove to him that his ancestor
wrote the plays. It will come as a surprise to his grace. But he believes his theory.
.............................................................
. . . Episode 8 - Lestrygonians

DLUGACZ: (Hoarsely.) Bleibtreustrasse, Berlin, W. 13.

(J. J. O’Molloy steps on to a low plinth and holds the lapel of his coat with solemnity.
His face lengthens, grows pale and bearded, with sunken eyes, the blotches of phthisis
and hectic cheekbones of John F. Taylor. He applies his handkerchief to his
[M]outh [A]nd sc[R]rutin[I]ses t[He] galloping tide of rosepink blood.)

[MARIH/e] 5
----------------------------------------------------------
Roger Manners: 5th Earl of Rutland
http://tinyurl.com/3usnzkb

The Case: This eccentric aristocrat enveloped his own person and
his literary activities in mystery & secrecy. He never published
anything in his own name, preferring to ascribe the authorship of his
works to "live masks," i.e. semiliterate people like William Shakspere
from Stratford-upon-Avon and Thomas Coryate from OLdcombe. This
was his, his wife's and a few friends' Grand Game, Theatre in Life.

Today we finally have a multitude of positively established facts
witnessing beyond any doubt to the Earl of Rutland's direct connection
with the Shakespeare oeuvre. For instance, the Belvoir Castle archives
keep a variant of a chant from Twelfth Night written in the Earl of
Rutland's hand, and a unique record of the Castle's steward about
payment of money to Shakespeare. Poet and playwright Ben Jonson, who
was well-acquainted with the Earl and Countess of Rutland, called them
and their close circle "poets of the Belvoir Vale." The scene of some
Shakespeare's plays is laid in the very towns of Northern Italy that
Rutland had earlier visited during his European travels. The exact and
accurate Danish realities appeared in Hamlet only after the Earl's
trip to Denmark. The mysterious "Shake-Speare" ceased his creative
work at the very same time when Roger Manners, the 5th Earl of
Rutland, and his wife passed away in 1612 (in quick succession one
after the other). The First Folio was to be released in 1622, the
10th obit of the Earl and his platonic wife. The Second Folio was
published in 1632, obviously to commemorate their 20th obit.>>
------------------------------------------------------------
___ The Rape of Lucrece Stanza 135
.
. Time's office is to fine the hate of foes,
. To eat up err[O|R]s by opinion bred,
. Not spend the dowry of a lawful bed.
. Time's gl[O]ry is to calm contending kings,
. To unmask falsehood and brin[G] *TRUTH to light* ,
. To stamp the *seal of time* in aged things,
. To wak[E] the morn and sentinel the night,
. To wrong the wronger till he [R]ender right,
. To ruinate proud buildings with thy hours,
. And s[M]ear with dust their glittering golden towers ;

Prob. of *O|ROGERM* with skip <50 ~ 1 in 70
.........................................................
. . . . . . <= 50 =>

. Toeatuperr [O|R] sbyop inionbredNotspendthedowryofalawfu
. lbedTimesg l [O] ryist ocalmcontendingkingsTounmaskfalse
. hoodandbri n [G]{TRUTH}tolightTostampthesealoftimeinaged
. thingsTowa k [E] themo rnandsentinelthenightTowrongthewr
. ongertillh e [R] ender rightToruinateproudbuildingswitht
. hyhoursAnd s [M] earwi thdusttheirglitteringgoldentowers
............................................
. To fill with WORM-holes stately monuments,
. To feed oblivion with decay of things,
. To *BLOT* old books and alter their contents,
. To pluck the quills from ancient ravens' wings,
. To dry the old oak's sap and cherish SPRINGS,
. To spoil antiquities of hammer'd steel,
. And turn the giddy round of Fortune's wheel ;
-------------------------------------------------------------
O, how thy *WO[R]TH* with *MANNERS* may I sing, [Sonnet: 39]
-------------------------------------------------------------
. . . . . . SONNET 83 *ROGER* : skip = 38
.
. Speaking of *WORTH* , what *WO[R]TH* in you doth grow,
. This silence for my sinne y[O]u did impute,
. Which shall be most my glory bein[G] dombe,
. For I impaire not beautie being mute,
. Wh[E]n others would giue life, and bring a tombe.
. The[R]e liues more life in one of your faire eyes,
. Then *BOTH YOUR POETS* can in praise deuise.
..................................................
. . . . . . . . . . . <= 38 =>

. SpeakingofworthwhatW [O|R] THinyoudothgrowT
. hissilenceformysinne. y[O] udidimputeWhichs
. hallbemostmyglorybei. n[G] dombeForIimpaire
. notbeautiebeingmuteW. h[E] notherswouldgiue
. lifeandbringatombeTh. e[R] eliuesmorelifein
. oneofyourfaireeyesTh. e-n-*BOTHYOURPOETScan*
. inpraisedeuise.
--------------------------------------------------------
<<The following passage by Mr. Pope stands as a preface
. to the various readings at the end of the 8th volume
. of his edition of Shakspeare, 1728.>> - Reed.
.................................................
.... Preface to Shakespeare By Alexander Pope

"But to the end EVERy reader may judge for himself, we have
annexed a compleat list of the rest; which if he shall think
trivial, or erroneous, either in part, or in whole; at worst it
can spoil but a half sheet of paper, that chances to be left
vacant here. And we purpose for the future, to do the same
with respect to any other persons, who thro' candor or vanity,
shall co[M]municate o[R] publish, th[E] least thin[G]s
tending t[O] the illust[R]ation of {OUR AUTHOR}."
..............................
. . <= 10 =>
.
.. c o [M] m u n i c a t
.. e o [R] p u b l i s h
.. t h [E] l e a s t t h
.. i n [G] s t e n d i n
.. g t [O] t h e i l l u
.. s t [R] a t i o n o f
. {O U .R. A U T H O R}."
.
[ROGER M]
----------------------------------------------------------------
. . . . As You Like It Act 3, Scene 2
.
Clo. Why, if thou nEVER was't at Court, thou nEVER saw'st good
. *MANNERS*: if thou nEVER saw'st good *MANERS*, then thy *MANNERS*
. must be wicked, and wickednes is sin, and sinne is damnation:
. Thou art in a parlous state shep-heard.
.
Cor. Not a whit Touchstone, those that are good *MANNERS* at the
. Court, are as ridiculous in the Countrey, as the behauiour of the
. Countrie is most mockeable at the Court. You told me, you salute
. not at the Court, but you kisse your hands; that courtesie would
. be vncleanlie if Courtiers were shepheards.
.................................................................
ROSALIND: Yes, one, and in this *MANNER*. He was to imagine me
. his love, his mistress; and I set him EVERy day to
. woo me: at which time would I, being but a moonish
. youth, grieve, be effeminate, changeable, longing
. and liking, proud, *FANTASTICAL*, apish, shallow,
. inconstant, full of tears, full of smiles, for EVERy
. passion something and for no passion truly any
. thing, as boys and women are for the most part
. cattle of this colour; would now like him, now loathe
. him; then entertain him, then forswear him; now weep
. for him, then spit at him; that I drave my suitor
. from his mad *HUMOUR* of love to a living *HUMOUR* of
. madness; which was, to forswear the full stream of
. the world, and to live in a nook merely monastic.
. And thus I cured him; and this way will I take upon
. me to wash your liver as clean as a sound sheep's
. heart, that there shall not be one spot of love in't.
-------------------------------------------------
____ SONNET 42 *ROGER M* : skip = 38

. Louing offendors thus I will excuse yee,
. Thou doost loue her, because thou knowst I loue her,
. And for my sake euen so doth she abuse me,
. Suff[R]ing my friend for my sake to approoue her,
. If I l[O]ose thee, my losse is (M)y loues gaine,
. And loosin[G] her, my friend hath f(O)und that losse,
. Both find[E] each other, and I loo(S)e both *TWAINE* ,
. And both fo[R] my sake *LAY ON ME THI(S) (CROSSE)* ,
. But here's the ioy, [MY FRIEND AND I ARE *ON(E)*] ,
. Sweete flattery, then she loues but me alone.
..................................................
. . . . . . <= 38 =>

. Suff [R] ingmyfriendformy s aketoa pprooueher
. IfIl [O] osetheemylosseis (M) yloues gaineAndlo
. osin [G] hermyfriendhathf (O) undtha tlosseBoth
. find [E] eachotherandIloo (S) ebotht waineAndbo
. thfo [R] mysakeLAYONMETHI (S)(CROSSE)Butheresth
. eioy [M. YFRIENDANDIAREON (E)]

[ROGER M] 38: Prob. of with skip <39 ~ 1 in 21
(MOSSE) 38
-------------------------------------------------
__________. Sonnet 94
.
. THey that haue powre to hurt, an[D] will do[E] *NONE* ,
. Th[A]t doe no[T] do t[H]e thing, they most do showe,
. Who mouing others, ar{E} them{S}elue{S} as st{O}ne,
. Vn{M}ooued, could, and to temptation *SLOW* :
.
[DEATH] 7
{MOSSE} -5
-----------------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Lovewell_%28Junior%29

<<John Lovewell (October 14, 1691 – May 8, 1725) was a famous Ranger
in the 18th century who fought during Dummer's War (also known as
Lovewell's War). He lived in present-day Nashua, New Hampshire. He
fought in Dummer's War as a militia captain, leading three expeditions
against the Abenaki Indians. Lovewell was commemorated by Henry
Wadsworth Longfellow with his poem, "The Battle of Lovells Pond",
& by Nathaniel Hawthorne with his story, "Roger Malvin's Burial".>>
..........................................................
_________ [Roger M]alvin
..........................................................
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Malvin%27s_Burial

<<"Roger Malvin's Burial" is one of the lesser known short
stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne, included in the collection
{MOSSE}s from an Old Manse. It concerns two colonial survivors
returning home after the battle known as Lovell's Fight.

The story begins in the year 1725, after Lovewell's Fight (Hawthorne
uses the name Lovell's Fight), a battle between the New Englanders and
natives in Dummer's War. An elderly soldier, Roger Malvin and a young
one, Reuben Bourne - survivors of the battle - try to get to a human
settlement through the forest. However, since they are both wounded
and weak, there is little hope that they will survive. They make a
rest near a rock that looks like an enormous tombstone. The older man
asks Reuben, whom he treats as a son, to leave him to die alone, since
his wounds are mortal. He is unable to go any further and, although
Reuben insists that he will drag Malvin further, the old man knows
that this would mean death for both of them. Malvin manages to
convince Reuben finally, and the young man leaves Malvin surely to
die. Reuben survives, but he cannot feel at peace because he has not
buried the old man as he had promised. Moreover, when he recovered,
he did not have the courage to tell Dorcas, Roger Malvin's daughter
and Reuben's fiancée, that he had left her father to die, even
though it was Malvin's wish. Reuben is considered a brave man,
but inside he feels that he has failed.

Dorcas and Reuben get married, but Reuben cannot fit into the society.
Many years later, when Reuben and Dorcas' son is already a grown boy,
Reuben decided that they will move out from the town they lived in
and that they will look for a free piece of land for themselves.
They travel through wilderness. At a rest, Reuben and his son
wander into the forest separately while Dorcas prepares a meal.

At a certain moment, Reuben hears something in
the bushes and shoots, *thinking it might be a deer* ,
but it turns out that he has killed his own son.

As he observes the terrain, it is obvious that this
is the same place where he had left Roger Malvin.
..........................................................
<<"In Shakespeare's tomb lies infinitely more than Shakepeare
EVER wrote. And if I magnify Shakepeare it is not so much for
what he did do but for what he did not do, or refrained from doing.

For *in this world of LIES* ,

*TRUTH* is forced to FLY like a scared white doe in the woodlands;
and only by cunning glimpses *Will she REVEal herself* ,
as in Shakespeare..">> -_Hawthorne and his {MOSSE}s_ (1850)

. HerMAN Melville's review of Hawthorne's story
. collection *{MOSSE}s from an Old MANSE*:

<< *MANSE* : Curse, or cursed house [unk. prob A.S.]>>
..........................................................
As in "My Kinsman, Major Molineux" and "The May-Pole of Merry Mount",
Hawthorne combines history and allegory. The background for "Roger
Malvin's Burial" are historic events, but the story itself contains
highly symbolic elements. The central theme of the story is guilt,
a psychological state Hawthorne explores very frequently.
----------------------------------------------------------------
.... Epilogue _ROSALYNDE OR, EUPHUES' GOLDEN LEGACY_

Here, gentlemen, may you see in Euphues' Golden Legacy, that such as
neglect their fathers' precepts, incur much prejudice; that division
in nature, as it is a blemish in nurture, so 'tis a breach of good
fortunes; that virtue is not measured by birth but by action; that
younger brethren, though inferior in years, yet may be superior to
honors; that concord is the sweetest conclusion, and amity betwixt
brothers more forceable than fortune. If you gather any fruits by this
Legacy, speak well of Euphues for writing it, and me for fetching it.
If you grace me with that favor, you encourage me to be
more forward; and as soon as I have overlooked my labors,
expect the Sailor's Calendar.

..... *T. LODGE. FINIS*
-----------------------------------------------------------
.. Ben Jonson (1623) _To the Memory of Shakespeare_
......................................................
. My Shakespeare, rise; I will no[T LODGE] thee
. by Chaucer, or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lye
. A little further, to make thee a roome :
. Thou art a Moniment, without a TOMBe,
.
[T LODGE] 1
...............................................................
...............................................................
. Shine *FORTH*, thou Starr{E O}f Poets, and wi[T|H} rage,
. Or inf[L]uence, chide, [O]r che{E}re the [D]rooping Sta[G]e;
. Which, si{N}c[E] thy flight frõ hence, hath mou{R}n'd like night,
. And despaires da{Y}, but for thy Volumes light.
.............................................
. . . . . <= 11 =>
.
.. S h i n e*F O R T H* t
.. h o u S t a r r{E O} f
.. P o e t s,a n d w i [T]
. {H}r a g e.O r i n f [L]
.. u e n c e,c h i d e,[O]
.. r c h e{E}r e t h e [D]
.. r o o p i n g S t a [G]
.. e;W h i c h,s i{N}c [E]
.. t h y f l i g h t f r õ
.. h e n c e,h a t h m o
.. u{R}n'd l i k e n i g
.. h t,A n d d e s p a i
.. r e s d a{Y}
.
[T LODGE] 11 : Prob. at end of poem ~ 1 in 19,000
{HENRY} 26 : Prob. at end of poem ~ 1 in 185
..................................................
(Shortest positive ELS [T LODGE] skip in KJV = 25)
-----------------------------------------------------
. Henry IV, Part 1 (Quarto 1, 1598)

Wor. Peace coosen, say no more.
. And now I will vnclaspe a *SECRET BOOKE* ,
. And to your quicke conceiuing discontents
. Ile read[E] you matter deepe and daun[G]erous,
. As full of perill an[D] aduenterous spirit,
. As to [O]rewalke a Current roring [L]owd,
. On the vnstedfast foo[T]ing of a *SPEARE*.
......................................................
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . <= 22 =>
.
. s a y n o m o. r e A n d n o w I W. I. L L v n
. c l a s p e a *S E C R E T B O O K. E* A n d t
. o y o u r q u. i c k e c o n c e i. u. i n g d
. i s c o n t e. n t s I l e r e a d [E] y o u m
. a t t e r d e. e p e a n d d a u n [G] e r o u
. s,A s f u l l. o f p e r i l l a n [D] a d u e
. n t e r o u s. s p i r i t,A s t o [O] r e w a
. l k e a C u r. r e n t r o r i n g [L] o w d,O
. n t h e v n s. t e d f a s t f o o [T] i n g o
. f a*S P E A R. E*.
.
[T LODGE] -22 (one of 6 *SPEARE*s) (only *SECRET BOOKE*)
--------------------------------------------------
... In his Frontline essay, William Murphy
.. mentions *THOMAS LODGE* once and only once:
......................................................
. Thirty-Six Plays in Search of an Author
. by William M. Murphy, Union College Symposium 1964
.............................................................
. There are those, like Delia Bacon, who are afflicted with what
. has been called the "Corporation Syndrome," holding that such
. distinguished literature must be the work of a commi[T]tee.
. Its members wou[L]d include, in additi[O]n to BACON and
. Oxfor[D], Robert {GREENE}, Geor[G]e PEELE, Samuel DANI[E]L,
*THOMAS NASHE, [THOMAS LODGE], Michael Drayton, and THOMAS DEKKER.*
................................................................
. . . . <= 17 =>
.
. .m u s t. b. e t h e w o r k o f a c
. .o m m i [T] t e e.I t s m e m b e r
. .s w o u [L] d i n c l u d e,i n a d
. .d i t i [O] n t o B a c o n a n d O
. .x f o r [D] R o b e r t{G R E E N E}
. .G e o r [G] e P e e l e,S a m u e l
. .D a n i [E] l,T h o m a s N a s h e,
. [T H O M .A. S L O D G E]

[T.LODGE] 17 : Prob. stuck on *THOMAS LODGE* ~ 1 in 100,000
..................................................................
..................................................................
It should be apparent to anyone possessing normal common sense, then, that
Shakespeare's authorship of the works is not merely "pro[B]able" or "likely,"
as some softhe[A]ds have put it, but absolutely [C]ompelling. Yet it is
common kn[O]wledge that after Delia [BACON] published her vague notions
about authorship in 1856 defenders of her unorthodox views and creators
of others multiplied like rabbits, and any reader of the modern newspaper
knows that the tribe increases every year.
........................................................
________............................. <= 25 =>
.
. S h a k e s p e a r e's a u t h o. r s h i. p. o f t
. h e w o r k s i s n o t m e r e l. y"p r o.[B] a b l
. e"o r"l i k e l y"a s s o m e s o. f t h e.[A] d s h
. a v e p u t i t,b u t a b s o l u. t e l y.[C] o m p
. e l l i n g.Y e t i t i s c o m m. o n k n.[O] w l e
. d g e t h a t a f t e r D e l i a. [B A C O N] p u b
. l i s h e d h e r v a g u e n o t i o n s
.
[BACON] 25 : Prob. stuck on [BACON] ~ 1 in 325
..................................................................
..................................................................
<<H[E REVE]eals in the Sonnets... that he had latent homosexual tendencies
and that he carried on a protracted and degrading adulterous affair with a
repulsive dark-skin(N)ed lady who probably gave him a l(O)athsome disease.
In short, Shake(S)peare didn't write the plays bec(A)use we don't know enough
about hi(M) -- or because we know too much. The l(A)yman takes his choice.>>
....................................................
. . . . . . <= 27 =>
.
. a. f. f a i r w i t h a r e p u l s i v e d a r k-s k i
. n (N) e d l a d y w h o p r o b a b l y g a v e h i m a
. l (O) a t h s o m e d i s e a s e.I n s h o r t,S h a k
. e (S) p e a r e d i d n't w r i t e t h e p l a y s b e
. c (A) u s e w e d o n't k n o w e n o u g h a b o u t h
. i (M) o r b e c a u s e w e k n o w t o o m u c h.T h e
. l (A) y m a n t a k e s h i s c h o i c e.
.
(A MASON) -27
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shakespeare/reactions/murphyarticle.html
..................................................................
Most anti-Stratfordians believe that
there is a vast conspiracy of silence by the members
of what they call the "S(TR)atford Establi(S)hment." In May,
1956, twen(T)y-two Oxfor{DIANS}, (I)ncluding nine la(W)yers,
took a half-pag{E} ad in Th{E S}hakespea{R}e Newslett{E}r to
berate {M}embers of the Establishment for refusing t{O} give
their case a fair hearing. The fact is, of {C}ourse, that their
case has been heard, thorou(G)hly explored, and found without merit.
.....................................................................
_________________________. <= 37 =>
.
. t ha tth e reis a va s tc. onsp i r acy. of si l e n c e b. y
. t he mem b erso f wh a tt. heyc a l lth. eS(TR)a t f o r d. E
. s ta bli(S)hmen t In M ay *twen(T)y-two* OX FO R {D I A N S}(I)
. n cl udi n gnin e la(W)ye. rsto o k aha. lf pa g {E}a d i n. T
. h{ES}hak e spea{R}eN e ws. lett{E}r tob. er at e {M}e m b e. r
. s of the E stab l is h me. ntfo r r efu. si ng t {O}g i v e. t
. h ei rca s eafa i rh e ar. ingT h e fac. ti so f {C}o u r s. e
. t ha tth e irca s eh a sb. eenh e a rdt. ho ro u (G)h l y e. x
. p lo red a ndfo u nd w it. hout m e rit.
.
(G){COMED/IANS} -37
{MERE/S} -10
(WITS TR) -15
..................................................................
. {MERE/S}'s Palladis Tamia; (WITS TR)easury,
. Being the Second Part of Wits Commonwealth (1598)
.
.... the best for {COMEDY} amongst vs bee,
. Edward Earle of Oxforde,
..................................................................
. Again, all the known evid[E]nce points to the STRATFO[R|D}
. SHAKESPEARE as the writ[E|R} of Hamlet, Macbeth, Henry [V],
{A}nd the other plays and po[E|M}s that have kept the worl[D]
{A}t the author's knees for almost four hundred years.
....................................................
. . . . . . <= *twenty-two* =>
.
. A g a i n,a l l t h e k n o w n e v i[D. E. N]
. c e p o i n t s t o t h e S T R A T F O [R]{D}
. S H A K E S P E A R E a s t h e w r i t [E]{R}
. o f H a m l e t,M a c b e t h,H e n r y [V]{A}
. n d t h e o t h e r p l a y s a n d p o [E]{M}
. s t h a t h a v e k e p t t h e w o r l [D]{A}
. t t h e a u t h o r's k n e e s f o r l. m
. o s t f o u r h u n d r e d y e a r s.

[DEVERE/NED] -22 : Prob. ~ 1 in 175
..................................................................
..................................................................
. But Shakespeare is not only a writer who expresses him[S]elf
. beautif[U]lly: he is an o[R]acle, a proph[E]t, almost a
. di[V]inity. No oth[E]r mortal writer shares his pinnacle.
...........................................
. <= *twenty-two/two* =>
.
. S h a k e s p e a. r. e
. i s n o t o n l y. a. w
. r i t e r w h o e. x. p
. r e s s e s h i m [S] e
. l f b e a u t i f [U] l
. l y:h e i s a n o [R] a
. c l e,a p r o p h [E] t,
. a l m o s t a d i [V] i
. n i t y.N o o t h [E] r
. m o r t a l w r i. t. e
. r s h a r e s h i. s. p
. i n n a c l e.
.
[E.VERUS] -11 : Prob. ~ 1 in 13,000
............................................................
............................................................
. Of the plays in the First Folio of 1623, all of which
. a[R]e univ[E]rsall[Y] conce[D]ed to b[E] by the same man...
............................................................
............................................................
. Hundreds of books and pamphlets have been produced in the
. course of the cont[R]ov[E]rs[Y], an[D] th[E] literature
. of the Baconians alone would stock a fair-sized library.
.
[E.DYER] -3, -6
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
____ SONNET 42 *ROGER M* : skip = 38
.
. Louing offendors thus I will excuse yee,
. Thou doost loue her, because thou knowst I loue her,
. And for my sake euen so doth she abuse me,
. Suff[R]ing my friend for my sake to approoue her,
. If I l[O]ose thee, my losse is (M)y loues gaine,
. And loosin[G] her, my friend hath f(O)und that losse,
. Both find[E] each other, and I loo(S)e both *TWAINE* ,
. And both fo[R] my sake *LAY ON ME THI(S) (CROSSE)* ,
. But here's the ioy, [MY FRIEND AND I ARE *ON(E)*] ,
. Sweete flattery, then she loues but me alone.
..................................................
. . . . . . <= 38 =>

. Suff [R] ingmyfriendformy. s. aketoa pprooueher
. IfIl [O] osetheemylosseis (M) yloues gaineAndlo
. osin [G] hermyfriendhathf (O) undtha tlosseBoth
. find [E] eachotherandIloo (S) ebotht waineAndbo
. thfo [R] mysakeLAYONMETHI (S)(CROSSE)Butheresth
. eioy [M. YFRIENDANDIAREON (E)]

[ROGER M] 38: Prob. of with skip <39 ~ 1 in 21
(MOSSE) 38
----------------------------------------------------
http://tinyurl.com/jq8h944
.
. This Shadowe is renowned Shakespea{R}'s?
. Soule o[F] th' [A]ge [T]he [A]pplause? delight?
. The wonder {O}f the Stage.
. Nature her selfe, was proud of his desi{G}nes
. [A]nd joy'd to weare the dressing of his lines,
. [T]h{E} learned will confess his works as such
. [A]s neithe{R MAN, NOR MUSE} can praise to much
. [F]or *EVER* live thy [FAME], the worl[D] to tell,
. Th[Y] like, no ag[E], shall *EVE[R]* paralell
....................................................
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . <= 41 =>
.
. ThisShadoweisrenownedShakespe a {R} sSoule oFth
. AgeTheApplausedelightThewonde r {O} ftheSt ageN
. atureherselfewasproudofhisdes i {G} nesAnd joyd
. towearethedressingofhislinesT h {E} learne dwil
. lconfesshisworksassuchAsneith e {R. MANNOR MUSE}
. canpraisetomuchForEVERlivethy F. A. MEthew orld
. totellThylikenoageshallEVERpa r. a. lell
.
{ROGER/MANNOR} 41 : Prob. ~ 1 in 2,550
[FATA] 3 : Prob. ~ 1 in 66
[DYER] 9
------------------------------------------------------
. Ben Jonson folio dedication:
.
. These are, as some infamous Baud, or *WHORE*,
. Should praise a Matron. What could hurt her more?
. But thou a[R]t proofe against them, and indeed
. Above th' ill fortune [O]f them, or the need.
. I, therefore will begin. Soule of the {A|G]e !
. The applause ! delight ! the wonder of our Stage !
. {My Sha{k|E]SPEARE}, rise; I will no{T LODGE} thee by
. Chaucer, or [SPENS{E|R], or bid Beaumont lye
. A little further, to make thee a roo[M]e :
. Thou art a Moniment, without a tombe,
............................................
. . . . . . <= 45 =>
.
. Bu. t t h o u a[R] tproof. eagainstthe. m andin. deedAbovethil
. lf. o r t u n e[O] fthemo. rtheneedIth. e refor. ewillbeginSou
. le. o f t h e{A|G] eTheap. plausedelig. h tthew. onderofourSta
. ge {M y S H A{k|E] SPEARE} riseIwillno {T LODGE} theebyChaucer
. or [S P E N S{E|R] orbidB. eaumontlyeA. l ittle. furthertomake
. th. e e a r o o[M] eThoua. rtaMoniment, w ithou. tatombe
.
[ROGER M] 45 : Prob. ~ 1 in 280
........................................................
. And such wert thou. Looke how the fathers face
. Lives in his issue, even so, the race
. Of Shakespeares minde, and *MANNERS* brightly shines
. In his well toned, and TRUE-filed lines :
-------------------------------------------------------
http://hollowaypages.com/jonson1692pœtaster.htm
.
THE POETASTER: OR, HIS ARRAIGNMENT (FOLIO)
.
Author: It is not so.
*I us'd no Name.* My Books have still been taught
. To spare the Persons, and to speak the Vices.
. These are meer Slanders, and enforc'd by such
. As have no safer ways to Mens Disgraces,
. But their own Lies, and loss of Honesty:
. Fellows of practis'd and most laxative Tongues,
. Whose empty and eager Bellies, i' the Year,
. Compel their Brains to many desp'rate Shifts,
(I spare to name 'em; for, their Wretchedness
. Fury it self would pardon.) These, or such,
. Whether of Malice, or of Ignorance,
. Or Itch t' have me their Adversary, (I know not)
. Or all these mixt; but sure I am, three Years
. They did provoke me with their petulant Styles
. On every Stage: And I at last, unwilling,
. But weary, I confess, of so [M]uch t[R]oubl[E],
. Thou[G]ht I w[O]uld t[R]y if Shame could win upon 'em;
............................................................
. . <= 5 =>
.
.. B u t w e
.. a r y, I c
.. o n f e s
.. s, o f s o
. [M] u c h t
. [R] o u b l
. [E],T h o u
. [G] h t I w
. [O] u l d t
. [R] y i f s
. h a m e
.
[ROGER M.] -5 : Prob. near the end ~ 1 in 940
.......................................................
. And therefore chose Augustus CÆsar's Times,
. When Wit and Arts were at their height in Rome,
. To shew that Virgil, Horace, and the rest
. Of those great Master-spirits, did not want
. Detractors then, or Practisers against them:
. And by {T}his Line (although no Paralle{L})
. I hop'd at last they would sit d{O}wn, and blush:
. But nothing coul{D} I find more contrary.
. And thou{G}h the Impudence of Flies be gr{E}at,
........................................................
. . . . . <= 25 =>
.
. A n d b y {T} h i s L i n e(a l t h o u g h n o P a
. r a l l e {L} I h o p'd a t l a s t t h e y w o u l
. d s i t d {O} w n,a n d b l u s h:B u t n o t h i n
. g c o u l {D} I f i n d m o r e c o n t r a r y.A n
. d t h o u {G} h t h e I m p u d e n c e o f F l i e
. s b e g r {E} a t,
.
{T.LODGE} 25 : Prob. near the end ~ 1 in 265
.....................................................
. Yet this hath so provok'd the angry Wasps,
. Or, as you said, of the next Nest, the Hornets,
. That they fly buzzing, mad, about my Nostrils,
. And like so many screaming Grashoppers
. Held by the Wings, fill EVERy Ear with Noise.
. And what? those former Calumnies you mention'd,
. First, of the Law: Indeed I brought in Ovid
. Chid by his angry Father, for neglecting
. The Study of their Laws, for Pœtry:
--------------------------------------------------
JULY 6, 1604 - Edward de Vere buried
. on St. GodeliEVE's Day
................................................
July 6, 1070 - St. GodeliEVE murdered by
. *DROWNING IN A POND* after being strangled into
. unconciousness by her mother-in-law's servants.
-------------------------------------------------
. *GROS(s)ER NAME* : *ENVIOU(s) SLIVER*
. *ROGE(r) MANERS* : *NIL VE(r)O VERIUS*
............................................
. . Hamlet (Quarto 1, 1603)

Queene: O my Lord, the yong Ofelia
. Hauing made a garland of sundry sortes of floures,
. Sitting vpon a willow by a brooke,
. The *ENVIOUS SPRIG* broke, into the brooke she fell,
..................................................
. Hamlet (Quarto 2, 1604) Act 4, Scene 7
.
Queen: There is a Willow growes ascaunt the Brooke
. That showes his horry leaves in the glassy streame,
. Therewith FANTASTIQUE gaRLANDs did she make
. Of Crowflowers, Nettles, Daises, and long *PURPLES*
. That liberall Shepheards giue *A GROS(s)ER NAM{E}* ,
. But our cull-c{O}ld maydes doe [D]ead mens fing[E]rs call them.
. There on the pen[D]ant boughes h[E]r *CRONET WEED{E}S*
. Clamb(RING) t{O} hang, an *ENVIO[U](s) SLIVER* brok[E],
. When downe he[R] weedy trophi[E]s and her selfe
................................................
. . . . . . . . <= 12 =>
.
. *A. G R O S (s) E R N A. M {E}*
.. B. u t o u. r. c u l l -c {O}
.. l. d m a y. d. e s d o. e [D]
.. e. a d m e. n. s f i n. g [E]
.. r. s c a l. l. t h e m. T. h
.. e. r e o n. t. h e p e. n [D]
.. a. n t b o. u. g h e s. h [E]
.. r *C R O N. E. T W E E. D {E}
.. S* C l a m. b.(R I N G) t {O}
.. h. a n g,a. n *E N V I. O [U]
. (s) S L I V. E. R*b r o. k [E]
.. W. h e n d. o. w n e h. e [R]
.. w. e e d y. t. r o p h. i [E]
.. s. a n d h. e. r s e l. f e
.
[DE{E.O.}UERE] 12
-------------------------------------------------------
. . David Roper Stratford Monument array:
........................................................
. . . . . . . . . . . . <= 34 =>

. TE. R R A T. E (G) I TPOP U L. U S M Æ R E T O{L Y . M P U S H A B E}T
.........................................................................
. ST. A Y P A. S (S) E NGER W H. Y G O E S T T H O U . B Y S O F A S T R
. EA. D I F T (H)(O) U CANS T W. H O M[E N V I O U S]. D E A T H H A T H
. PL. A(S)T W (I)(T) H INTH I S {M O N[U]M E N T} {S H A K S P E A R E}W
. IT (H W H)O (M)(E) Q UICK(N)a {T U R[E|D]I D E} {W H O S E N A M E D}O
.<TH. D(E)C K> Y (S) T OMBE F A. R M O[R|E]. t H E N C O S T{S I E H}A L
. LY. T(H)E H. A (T) H WRIT T L. E[A.V|E|S L I V]. I N G A R T B U T P A
. GE. T O S E. R. V. E HISW I T. T
....................................................................
............................ "[ENVIOUS SLIV/ER] broke"
--------------------------------------------------------------
I read Michell's hardback book 25 years ago and it
soon after fell apart so I bought a new paperback.

Michell not only sold me on ciphers but also on group theory...

I think Oxford wrote the (self referential) Hamlet 1603
Quarto while others (including Rutland & Lord STRANGE)
improved upon it for the 1604 Quarto.

After Rutland died in 1612
William Stanley honored him in Hamlet's letter:
----------------------------­-------------­-----------
.... 1623 Folio (Act 4, Scene 7)
. Claudius reads Hamlet's letter to Laertes:

'High and mighty, You shall know I am set naked on
. your kingdom. To-morrow shall I beg leave to see
. your kingly eyes: when I shall, first asking your
. pardon thereunto, recount the occasion of my sudden
. *AND MORE STRANGE RE(t)URN*.' 'HAMLET.'
......................................................
____. *AND MORE STRANGE RE(t)URN*
____ *ROGER MANNERS, E. RUT(l)AND*
------------------------------------------------------
________. Sonnet 111
.
O For my sake doe you wish fortune chide,
The guiltie goddesse of my harmfull deeds,
That did not better for my life prouide,
Then publick meanes which publick *MANNERS* breeds.
Then{C}e *COMES* it that *MY NAME* receiues {A} brand,
And almost thence my natu{R}e is subdu'd
To what it workes in, l{I}ke th[E DYER]S HAND,
Pitty me then, a{N}d wish *I wERE REnU'DE*,
Whilst like {A} willing pacient I will drinke,
Potions of Eysell gainst my strong infection,
No bitternesse that I will bitter thinke,
Nor double penna.nce to correct correction.
..................
{CARINA} 27 [Latin for the keel of a ship]
----------------------------------------------------
________. Sonnet 112
.
YOur loue and pittie doth th'impression fill,
Which vulgar scandall stampt vpon my brow,
For what care I who calles me well or ill,
So you ore-greene my bad, my good alow?
You are my All the world, and I must str(I)ue,
To know my (S)hames and pr(A)ises from your t[O]unge,
None e[L]se to me, nor [I] to none ali[V]e,
That my st[E]el'd sence o[R] changes ri[G]ht or wrong,
In so profound Abisme I throw all care
Of others voyces, that my Adders sence,
To cryttick and to flatterer stopped are:
Marke how with my neglect I doe dispence.
You are so strongly in my purpose bred,
That all the world besides me thinkes y'are dead.
..............................................
. . . . . . <= 10 =>
.
.. Y o u a r e. m. y A l
.. l t h e w o. r. l d,a
.. n d I m u s. t. s t r
. (I)u e,T o k. n. o w m
.. y(S)h a m e. s. a n d
.. p r(A)i s e. s. f r o
.. m y o u r t [O] u n g
.. e,N o n e e [L] s e t
.. o m e,n o r [I] t o n
.. o n e a l i [V] e,T h
.. a t m y s t [E] e l'd
.. s e n c e o [R] c h a
.. n g e s r i [G] h t o
.. r w r o n g,
.
(ISA.).... 11
[OLIVER].. 10
[GREVIL.] -10 : Prob. of [GREVIL] in Sonnets ~ 1 in 145
. Fulke [GREVIL]le: Recorder of Stratford (1606-1628)
---------------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulke_Greville,_1st_Baron_Brooke

<<Fulke Greville, 1st Baron Brooke, de jure 13th Baron Latimer and 5th Baron Willoughby de Broke KB PC, known before 1621 as Sir Fulke Greville, was an Elizabethan poet, dramatist, and statesman who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1581 and 1621, when he was raised to the peerage. Greville was a capable administrator who served the English Crown under Elizabeth I and James I as, successively, treasurer of the navy, chancellor of the exchequer, and commissioner of the Treasury, and who for his services was in 1621 made Baron Brooke, peer of the realm. Greville was granted Warwick Castle in 1604, making numerous improvements. Greville is best known today as the biographer of Sir Philip Sidney, and for his sober poetry, which presents dark, thoughtful and distinctly Calvinist views on art, literature, beauty and other philosophical matters.

In 1628 Greville was stabbed at his house in London by Ralph Haywood, a servant who believed that he had been cheated in his master's will. Haywood then turned the knife on himself. Greville's physicians treated his wounds by filling them with pig fat which turned rancid and infected the wounds, and he died in agony four weeks after the attack. His body was brought back to Warwick, and he was buried in the Collegiate Church of St Mary, Warwick, and on his tomb was inscribed the epitaph he had composed:

Folk Grevill
Servant to Queene Elizabeth
Conceller to King James
and Frend to Sir Philip Sidney.
Trophaeum Peccati.>>
---------------------------------------------------------------------
___ Loues Labour's lost (Folio, 1623) Actus primus.
.
Dumane: My louing Lo[R]d, Dumane is m[O]rtified,
. The [G]ROS(S)ER *MANN[E]R* of these wo[R]lds delights,
. He throwes vpon the grosse worlds baser slaues:
. (T)o loue, (T)o weal(T)h, to pom{P}e, I pin{E} and di{E},
. With a{L}l thes{E} liuin{G} in Philosophie.
....................................................
. . . <= 6 =>

. (T) o. l o u e,
. (T) o. w e a l
. (T) h, t o p o
.. m {P} e,I p i
.. n {E} a n d d
.. i {E},W i t h
.. a {L} l t h e
.. s {E} l i u i
.. n {G} i n P h
.. i. l. o s o p
.. h. i. e
..{PEELE,G} 6 {Prob. ~ 1 in 2350, Folio only}
...........................................
. . . . . . <= 11 =>

. M y l o u i n g L o [R] d,
... D u m a n e i s m [O] r
... t i f i e d,T h e [G] r
... o s s e r*M A N N [E] R*
... o f t h e s e w o [R] l
... d s d e l i g h t (S),

[ROGER] (S) 11 {Prob. ~ 1 in 550, Folio only}
------------------------------------------------
.... *GROS(S)ER MANNER*
.... *ROGER (S) MANNERS*
.........................................
*GROS(S)ER NAME* : *ENVIOU(S) SLIVER*
*ROGE(R) MANERS* : *NIL VE(R)O VERIUS*
-----------------------------------------
. *MULTUM IN PARVO*
. *Much in Little*
.
. motto of : {E. RUTLAND} ROGER Manners
------------------------------------------
. Twixt this T{URTLE AND} his Queen.
.......................................
. Whereupon it made this Threne,
. To the {PHOENIX} and the Dove,
. Co-su[P]remes [A]nd sta[R]s of lo[V]e,
. As Ch[O]rus to their Tragic scene.
....................................
. . <= 6 =>
.
. C o s u [P] r
. e m e s [A] n
. d s t a [R] s
. o f l o [V] e,
. A s c h [O] r
. u s t o. t. h
. e i r t. r. a
. g i c s. c. e
. n e.

Prob. of *PARVO* ~ 1 in 4400 (any skip)
--------------------------------------------
Adam. Y[O]nder comes my *MASTER*, yo[U]r brother.

Orlan. Goe a-[PAR]t Adam, and thou shalt
..... he[A]re how he *WILL SHAKE* me v[P].

[PARUO] -20
---------------------------------------------------
..... As You Like It: III, iii

Clo. : for heere wee haue no Temple but the wood,
. no assembly but horne-[B]easts. But what though? Courage.
[A]s hornes are odious, they are ne[C]essarie. It is said,
. many a man kn[O]wes no end of his goods; right: Ma[N]y
. a man has good Hornes, and knows no end of them.

[BACON] 26
--------------------------------------------
. LET the bird of loudest lay
. On the sole Arabian tree,
. Herald sad and trumpet be:
. To whose sound cha[S]te wings obey.
. But tho[U] shrieking harbinge[R],
. Foul precurrer of th[E] fiend,
. Augur of the fe[V]ers end,
. To this troup[E] {COME (t)}hou not near!
..........................................
. . . . . . <= 18 =>
.
. L e t t h e. b. i r d o f.. l o u d e s
. t l a y O n. t. h e s o l.. e A r a b i
. a n t r e e, H. e r a l d.. s a d a n d
. t r u m p e. t. b e:T o w.. h o s e s o
. u n d c h a [S] t e w i n.. g s o b e y.
. B u t t h o [U] s h r i e.. k i n g h a
. r b i n g e [R],F o u l p.. r e c u r r
. e r o f t h [E] f i e n d,. A u g u r o
. f t h e f e [V] E R S E n.. d,T o t h i
. s t r o u p [E]{C O M E(t)} h o u n o t
. n e a r!
.
Prob. of *E.VERUS* ~ 1/12,240 (any skip)
........................................
. [E]douardus [VERUS] , {COME(s)} Oxoniae,
. Vicecomes Bulbeck, Dominus de Scales
. & Badlismer, D. Magnus Angliae Ca-
. merarius: Lectori. S. D.
.
http://comp.uark.edu/~mreynold/aulicus.html
--------------------------------------------------------
And though thou hadst *SMALL* Latine , and lesse Greeke,
..................................................
. *PARVO* : *SMALL* (Latine)
..................................................
. The merry Greeke, tart Aristo[P]hanes,
.*NEAT* Terence, witty Plautus, now not ple[A]se;
. But antiquated, and deserted lye
. As they we[R]e not of Natures family.
. Yet must I not give Nat[U]re all: Thy Art,
. My gentle Shakespeare, must enj[O]y a part;
..................................................
. . . . . . . . . . . . <= 38 =>

. ThemerryGreeketartAristo [P] hanesNeatTere
. ncewittyPlautusnownotple [A] seButantiquat
. edanddesertedlyeAstheywe [R] enotofNatures
. familyYetmustInotgiveNat [U] reallThyArtMy
. gentleShakespearemVstenj [O] yapart

______________ [PARUO] : skip = 38
..................................................
. *MULTUM IN PARVO*
. *Much in Little*
.
. motto of : {E. RUTLAND} ROGER Manners
------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timon_of_Athens

<<Timon is *not initially* a misanthrope. He is a wealthy and generous
Athenian gentleman. He gives a large banquet, attended by nearly all
the main characters. Timon gives away money wastefully, and everyone
wants to please him to get more, except for Apemantus, a churlish
philosopher whose cynicism Timon cannot yet appreciate. He accepts art
from Poet and Painter, and a jewel from the Jeweller, but by the end
of Act 1, he has given that away to another friend. Timon's servant,
Lucilius, has been wooing the daughter of an old Athenian. The man is
angry, but Timon pays him three talents in exchange for the couple
being allowed to marry, because the happiness of his servant is worth
the price. Timon is told that his friend, Ventidius, is in debtors'
prison. He sends money to pay Ventidius's debt, and Ventidius is
released and joins the banquet. Timon gives a speech on the value
of friendship. The guests are entertained by a masque, followed by
dancing. As the party winds down, Timon continues to give things
away to his friends; his horses, and other possessions.>>
---------------------------------------------------
From: Stephanie Caruana (spear-sha...@mindspring.com)
Subject: Re: Complete morons 1999/12/07
Newsgroups: humanities.lit.authors.shakespeare
--
I feel it's only fair to mention that Oxford's home for a
while in the late 80's or so was "Fisher's Folly", just outside
Bishopsgate, in Bishopsgate Ward. It is described in John
Stow's "London Under Elizabeth: A Survey," (1598) as follows:

"Next to [John Paulet's new house], a far more large and beautiful
house, with gardens of pleasure, bowling alleys, and such like,
built by Jasper Fisher, free of the goldsmiths, late one of the
six clerks of the chancery and a justice of the peace. It hath
since for a time been the Earl of Oxford's place. The queen's
majesty Elizabeth ha[TH LODGE]d there. It now belongeth to Sir
*ROGER MANERS*. This house, being so large and sumptuously built
by a man of no greater calling, possessions, or wealth, for
he was indebted to many, was mockingly called Fisher's Folly..."
-----------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.motco.com/Harben/2087.htm

<<Fisher's Folly.-In Bishopsgate Street, in Bishopsgate Ward Without.
A house built by Jasper Fisher, one of the six clerks in Chancery.
It afterwards belonged to the Earl of Oxford and in Stow's time to
Sir *ROGER MANARS*. Mockingly called Fisher's folly, he being a
man of no great possessions and indebted to many. Capital messuage,
buildings, yards, etc., at Bishopsgate, formerly the six gardens
late purchased of Martin Bowes, etc., belonging to Jasper Fisher,
22 Eliz. 1580 (Lond. I. p.m. III. p. 19).

He also had possession of an alley called "Toddes alley" with houses,
etc., at Bishopsgate, 22 Eliz. 1580 (ib.) which formerly belonged
to the priory or new hospital of St. Mary without Bishopsgate,
32 H. VIII. 1540 (L. and P. H. VIII. XV. p. 411). In the 17th
century the house was occupied by the Earls of Devonshire
as their town house and called Devonshire House (q.v.).>>
---------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.hrionline.ac.uk/strype/TransformServlet?page=book2_096

_A Survey of the Cities of London and Westminster_
.
. Written at first in the Year 1598. By JOHN STOW.
. Since Reprinted and Augmented by the AUTHOR;
. And afterwards by A.M. H.D. and others.

. NOW LASTLY. Corrected, Improved, and very much Enlarged: And the
. SURVEY and HISTORY brought down from the Year 1633, (being near
. Fourscore Years since it was last printed) to the present Time;
.. By JOHN STRYPE, 1720

<<Then is there a fair House of late builded by the Lord John Powlet.
Next to that, a far more large and beautiful House, with Gardens of
Pleasure, Bowling Alleys, and such like, builded by Jasper Fisher,
free of the Goldsmiths, late one of the sixe Clerkes of the Chancery,
and a Justice of Peace. It hath since (for a time) been the Earl of
Oxford's Place. The Queen's Majesty Elizabeth ha[TH LODGE]d there: It
belonged to Mr. Cornwallis: Then to Sir *ROGER MANNERS*. Afterwards
it was the Earl of Oxford's, and after the Earl of Devon's. This
House being so largely and sumptuously builded, by a Man of no
greater Calling, or Possessions, [or Wealth, for he was indebted
to many] was mockingly called Fisher's Folly, and a Rhyme was
made of it, and other the like, in this *MANNER*;

Fishers Folly.

. Kirkebies Castle, and Fisher's Folly,
. Spinolas Pleasure, and Megses Glory.

And so of other like Buildings about the City Men
have not letted to speak their Pleasure.

From Fisher's Folly up to the West end of Berward's Lane, (of old time
so called, but now *HOG LANE*, because it meeteth with *HOG LANE*)
which cometh from the Bars without Aldgate, as is afore shewed;>>
----------------------------------------------------------
.. The Life of Christopher Marlowe
http://swc2.hccs.cc.tx.us/HTMLS/ROWHTML/faust/marlowe.htm
.
<<In 1587, Marlowe received his M.A. and moved to London, where
he spent most of the rest of his life. The history of Marlowe's
remaining six years of his life traces a series of violent clashes
with the law. By 1589 he was living in Norton Folgate, near the
theaters, close to Thomas *WATSON*, the poet. In September,
Marlowe & William Bradley fell to fighting in *HOG LANE* ,
where upon *WATSON* came to Marlowe's rescue.
In the ensuring brawl *WATSON* fatally stabbed Bradley.
Though Marlowe fled the scene, both he and *WATSON* were imprisoned
in Newgate, Marlowe for two weeks and *WATSON* for a longer time. On
December 3, 1589 Marlowe & *WATSON* appeared for trial & discharged
with a warning to keep the peace. This he failed to do, for three
years later he was summoned to appear at the Middlesex sessions
for assaulting two shoreditch constables in Holleywell Street. The
constables said they went in fear of their lives because of him.>>
--------------------------------------------------------
Worcester's, *Oxford's* and *The Admiral's*
First published in Shakespearean Authorship Review (English)

http://www.sourcetext.com/sourcebook/library/bowen/26worcester.htm

*Fisher's Folly* , so-called after the builder and first owner,
Jasper Fisher, who died in 1579/80, was in the 1580's
the residence of the Earl of Oxford. It was later to become
Devonshire House and Thomas Fuller (1608-1661) informs us
that Edward Alleyn "was born in the aforesaid parish
(i.e. St. Botolph's, Bishopsgate), near Devonshire House,
where now is *THE SIGN OF THE <PIE>*. He was bred a Stage-player"
- [Worthies of England (1662), by Thomas Fuller.]

At *THE SIGN OF THE <PIE>*, one would naturally expect to find
an inn, which of course, would have given its name to the alley,
not the other way round; so in spite of Fuller's "now," the inn
must have existed, under that name, at least as early as 1615.
*PIE (or MagPIE) ALLEY* was just south of Devonshire Street,
leading to Devonshire House, and *PIE ALLEY* presumably led
to the *PIE INN*, which was, therefore, not only "near"
but "next" to Devonshire House. As G. F. Warner writes
in his Introduction to the Catalogue of MSS. & Muniments of
Alleyn's College, Dulwich: "Fuller's often-quoted statement
that he (Edward Alleyn) "was born 'near Devonshire House,
where now is *THE SIGN OF THE PIE*' is fully confirmed
by the mention of *PYE ALLEY* and Fisher's Folly,
the old name of Devonshire House, in close connexion
with his father's property." [G. F. Warner, p. XV.]

It seems that he had sold Fisher's Folly just in time, and at
about the same time he sold Oxford Place, near London Stone,
to Sir John Hart who, as Stow tells us, kept his mayoralty there.

Oxford was certainly in no position at this time to maintain a London
company of players, and a company travelling under his name is last
heard of at Maidstone in 1589-90. At about the same time, a company
under the patronage of Edward, 4th Earl of Worcester (son of the
third Earl) makes its first appearance, at Coventry. It was this
company which, sooner or later, was amalgamated with Oxford's.

Meanwhile, on 14th July 1589, the Privy Council had written to
Adlerman John Hart and others, "requiring them to take order for
the relief of John Allen, "servaunte to me the Lo. Admirall,"
against a certain Dr. Martin, "who seeketh by indirecte meanes
to make frustrate a lease of a certain tenement and a garden
demised by one John Roise to the suppliant's father and Mother and
himselfe." [G. F. Warner, p. 85.] This letter, signed by Charles
Howard (the Lord Admiral) and other members of the Privy Council
contains what seems to be the earliest known reference to John
Alleyn as "servant to the Lord Admiral." It is well known that
he was in the Admiral's service "in" 1589 and I have, therefore,
gone to a good deal of trouble to find out on what contemporary
evidence this rather vague knowledge is based. According to the
Shakespeare Encyclopaedia, he was "listed in 1589 as a member of
the Admiral's Men and as part owner, with his brother Edward, of
'playinge apparelles . . .'" which rather implies that the source
of both pieces of information was the same; but as I have said,
Richard Jones's deed of sale names no company. The odds were,
of course, heavily against finding any such allusion,
dated 1589 and earlier than 3rd January, but the above
letter was in fact written six months after the deed of sale.

In the deed of sale, itself, John Alleyn was described as a
"Citizen and Innholder of London," and though no parish is named,
he was presumably still an innholder of St. Botolph's without
Bishopsgate; as he is known to have been just a year before, or less.
Now, I am not suggesting that the property referred to in the letter
was identical with that bought by John and Edward from their mother
and step-father in 1585, obviously it was not, though it may have
been adjacent to it. Anyway, this dispute over the lease is worth
noting for what it tells us of John's reduced circumstances shortly
after the sale of Fisher's Folly. He was badly in need of a powerful
friend at this time and found one in the Admiral, who may have taken
him into his own household, but there is no need to suppose that he
became a member of the Admiral's company before November 1590, when
he and James Tunstall were playing at the Theatre. The dispute over
the lease was apparently still unresolved in December, 1589, when
Howard drafted a letter to Sir William Drury, D.C.L., "umpire in
the above dispute, asking his friendship and favour in behalf of
his servant, John Allen." [G. F. Warner, p. 86.] We do not know
the outcome, and neither do we know what became at this time of
those four messages next to Fisher's Folly, though we may infer
from the lease of 1615 that either John or Edward, or both, still
owned "PYE ALLEY," but neither of them seems to have lived there
after 1592, when John Alleyn describes himself as late of the
parish of St. Botolph without Bishopsgate.>>
------------------------------------------------------------------
-- Stephen Pile, "The Book of Heroic Failures"
.
<<The Least Successful Collector Betsy Baker played a central role in
the history of collecting. She was employed as a servant in the house
of John Warburton (1682-1759) who had amassed a fine collection of
58 1st edition plays, including most of the works of Shakespeare.
One day Warburton returned home to find 55 of them charred beyond
legibility. Betsy had either burned them or used them as <PIE>
bottoms. The remaining 3 folios are now in the British Museum.>>
.
[NOTE: some 60 manuscripts of plays of this period eventually come
. into the hands of a collector named John Warburton* (1682-1759).
.
Many are the only surviving co<PIES> of plays that had never
been printed. Unfortunately Warburton was careless with them and
his servant, Betsy Baker, made use of them to light her stove
and line the bottom of <PIES>.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------
...................... <PIES>
...................... <SPEI>
.......................................................
For his title pages, Field adopted an Aldine device, an anchor
with the Latin motto Anchora <SPEI>, "anchor of <HOPE>,"
which previously belonged to the Vautrollier.
-------------------------------------------------------
Naumachia, or [Abraham] Hollands sea-fight (1622)
......................................................
. . . . A Caveat to his Muse
.
. To wrap her sope in, or a least be droven
. To keepe a <PIE> from scorching in the Oven:
. Or else expos'd a laughing stock to sots,
. To cloke Tobacco, or stop Mustard pots,
--------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simple_Simon_(nursery_rhyme)
https://tinyurl.com/y3b57cc6

<<The area was known as Rennerstrete in the 15th century, famous London
historian Stow considered that the name “<PIE> Corner” from the sign
of the <PIE>, “a fayre Inn for recipte of travellers, but now divided
into tenementes “. <PIE> Corner in the 17th century was often mentioned
. for its food, Ben Jonson writes in the Alchemist in 1612 remarks:
.
. “I shall put you in mind, sir, at <PIE> Corner,
.. Taking your meal of steam in from cooks’ stalls.”
.
In the 18th century, Strype mentions <PIE> Corner, as “noted chiefly
. for cooks’ shops and pigs dressed there during Bartholomew Fair.”
.......................................................
. (Edward [ALLEY]n) "was born 'near Devonshire House,
. where now is *THE SIGN OF THE PIE*' is fully confirmed
. by the mention of *<PIE> ALLEY* & *Fisher's Folly*,
.......................................................
After his library FIRE of 1623 Ben Jonson (1572-1637)
. wrote of his LOSS in "An Execration upon Vulcan"
.......................................................
. Thou mightst have had me perish, piece by peic[E],
. To light Tobacco, or sa[V]e roasted Geese.
. Sindg[E] Capons, or *poor Piggs* , d[R]oping their Eyes;
. Cond[E]mn'd me to the Ovens witH the <PIES> ;
.....................................................
_______________ <= 19 =>
.
.. T. h{O}u .m i g h t s t h a v e h a d m
.. e {E}p{E} r i s h,p i{E}c e b y p{E}i c
. [E] T{O}l .i g h t T{O}b a c c{O|O}r s a
. [V]{E}r o .a s t{E}d G{E|E}s{E}S i n d g
. [E]{C}a p .o n s{O}r p{O|O}r P i g g s,d
. [R]{O}p i .n g t h{E}i r{E}y e s;C o n d
. [E] m n'd .m e t{O}t h e{O}v e n s w i t
.. H. t h e <P I{E}S>;
.
[E.VERE] 19 : Prob. ~ 1 in 1020
{E.C.O.} 19
22 {E.O.}s : Prob. ~ 1 in 64
------------------------------------------------------------
. . . . . . . . . . <= 19 =>
.
.. T. OTHEO . (N) l. . {I} .. <E> B. E . G . E. T. T. E R O
.. F. THESE.. (I) n. . {S} . . U.<I> N. G . S. O. N. N E T
.. S. MrWha.. (L) L. . [H]A . . .{P}<P>.{I} (N){S} S {S}E A
.. N. Dthat.. (E) T. . [E]R . . . N <I>. T .(I) E <P> R O M
.. I. SEDB. Y O u . .. [R]E . . . V <E>. R .(L)<I> V. I N G
. <P> OEtW. I s h . .. [E]T . . . H (T). H .<E> W. E. L L W
. <I> ShIN. G a . .. [d V e] . .. N (T). u . . . R. eRI N S
. <E> tTIN. G fort. . .. . .. . . H (T). t
........................................................
. Probability of Upper & Lower (NILE)'s ~ 1/176,000
. Probability of 4 oven <PIE>'s ~ 1/38,000
-----------------------------------------------------
"Shakespeare": "They tke the *FLOW o' the NILE*
____ By certain scales i' the Pyramid."
....................................................
....................... T
..................... O T H
................... E O N L I
................. E B E G E T T
............... E R O F T H E S E
............. I N S U I N G S O N N
........... E T S M R W{H}A L L H A P
......... P I N E S S E{A}N D T H A T E
....... T E R N I T I E[P]R O M I S E D B
..... Y O U R E V E R L[I]V I N G P O E T W
... I S H E T H T H E W[E]L L W I S H I N G A
. D V E N T U R E R I N[S]E T T I N G F O R T H
....................................................
[PIES] Prob. in center bottom ~ 1 in 32,000
....................................................
{HAPI} Prob. in center ~ 1 in in 16,000
(WIFE.O.)
.................................................................
<<{HAPI} (Golden Dawn) One of the Four Sons of Horus, {HAPI}
. was represented as a mummified man with the head of a *BABOON*.
.He was the protector of the lungs of the deceased, & was protected
. by the goddess Nephthys. The name {HAPI}, spelled with different
. HIEROGLYPHs, in most but not all cases, is also the name
. of the god who was the personification of the River *NILE*
. depicted as a corpulent man [Falstaff? / N(ev)ILE?]
. with a *CROWN of LILIES* (Upper {NILE} )
______ or papyrus plants (Lower {NILE>). - Shawn C. Knight
---------------------------------------------------------------
http://deveresocietyaustralia.wordpress.com/silexedra/

<<*SILEXEDRA* at Fisher’s Folly of Bishopsgate was Edward de
Vere’s little writing factory full of his early band of frontmen.
This period lasted 1580-88/91. The *SILEXEDRA* motley crew included:

• Angel {DAY}

• John [LILL]ie – “Euphues”
– the first English novel with dedication to Vere;

• [T]homas [LODGE] – “Rosalynde: Euphues Golden Legacy, Found After
.. His Death In His Cell At *SILEXEDRA*” (based on As You Like It).
.<<Lodge would later reminisce about the Silexedra years in his novel
. Euphues's Shadow. In a prefatory epistle to the book, Lodge noted
. how “Euphues repent the prime of his youth misspent in *FOLLY* and
. virtuously end the winter of his age in *SILEXEDRA*.>> - Mark Anderson
.................................................................
<<{HAPI} (Golden Dawn) One of the Four Sons of Horus, {HAPI}
. was represented as a mummified man with the head of a *BABOON*.
.He was the protector of the lungs of the deceased, & was protected
. by the goddess Nephthys. The name {HAPI}, spelled with different
. HIEROGLYPHs, in most but not all cases, is also the name
. of the god who was the personification of the River *NILE*
. depicted as a corpulent man [Falstaff? / N(ev)ILE?]
. with a *CROWN of LILIES* (Upper {NILE} )
______ or papyrus plants (Lower {NILE>). - Shawn C. Knight
------------------------------------------------------------
https://hauntedpalaceblog.wordpress.com/tag/thomas-horner/

<<"Little [I]ack [HORNER]" was in fact [TH]omas [HORNER], the steward of Abbot Whiting of Glastonbury. The story goes that the abbot had sent Horner on a mission to see King Henry VIII in London, the aim of which was to try to save Glastonbury Abbey from being dissolved. Feeling hungry on the journey, Horner, who had been sent on his way with a <PIE>, decided to eat a piece of it. To his surprise instead of pulling out the mince filling he pulled out a deed to one of Glastonbury’s smaller properties. On examining the contents of the <PIE> he found a further eleven deeds concealed inside. Keeping the first deed, he delivered the other papers to the king. The abbot was caught in a no-win situation as he could not accuse Horner of theft because then he would have to openly admit to trying to bribe the king giving Henry an easy excuse to charge the abbot with corruption. Horner gained the deeds to the estate of Mells {MANOR} in Somerset where his descendants lived until the beginning of the 20th century.

“Take a Legge of Muton, and cut the best of the flesh from the bone, and
parboyl it well then put to it three-pound of the best Mutton suet and shred
it very small; then spread it abroad, and fashion it with Salt Cloves and Mace”

The quote above is taken from a 1615 recipe for mince <PIES>. The recipe goes on to instruct the reader to place the mixture in a coffin or divers coffin before baking. The coffin is in fact a dough crust in the shape of a basket or box which was several inches thick and had been cooked for several hours. The coffin was inedible and acted as a container and cooking vessel to keep the meat tender by preventing the juice meat dripping away. Due to the sturdy nature of the <PIES>, people often hid valuable objects such as jewellery, money and important papers in them to stop their possessions falling into the hands of robbers. Therefore it is highly plausible that the deeds to the Glastonbury properties would have been hidden in a mince-pie.

It is also interesting to note that mince <PIES> were considered
symbols of Catholic idolatry and were banned under Oliver Cromwell.>>
------------------------------------------------------------
. . . F.F. : To the great Variety of Readers.

. . . . {And if then you doe not like him},
surely you are in some manifest dange[R], not to vnderstand him.
And so w[E] leaue you to other of his Frie[N]ds, whom if you need,
can bee you[R] guides: if you neede them not, y[O]u can leade
your selues, and ot[H]ers. And such Readers we wish h[I]m.

Iohn Heminge.
Henrie Condell.
...........................................................
. . . . . <= 25 =>
.
.{A n d i f t .h. e n y o u d o e n o t l i k e h i m},
. s u r e l y .y. o u a r e i n s o m e m a n i f e s
. t d a n g e [R],n o t t o v n d e r s t a n d h i m.
. A n d s o w [E] l e a u e y o u t o o t h e r o f h
. i s F r i e [N] d s,w h o m i f y o u n e e d,c a n
. b e e y o u [R] g u i d e s:i f y o u n e e d e t h
. e m n o t,y [O] u c a n l e a d e y o u r s e l u e
. s,a n d o [T H] e r s.A n d s u c h R e a d e r s w
. e w i s h h [I] m.
.
[I.HORNER] -25 : Prob. at end ~1 in 14,000
------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Jack_Horner

<<"Little [I]ack [HORNER]" is actually about [THo]mas [HORNER], who was steward to Richard Whiting, the last abbot of Glastonbury before the dissolution of the monasteries under Henry VIII of England. It is asserted that, prior to the abbey's destruction, the abbot sent Horner to London with a huge Christmas <PIE> which had the deeds to a dozen {MANORS} hidden within it as a gift to try to convince the King not to nationalise Church lands. During the journey Horner opened the <PIE> and extracted the deeds of the {MANOR} of Mells in Somerset, which he kept for himself. It is further suggested that, since the {MANOR} properties included lead mines in the Mendip Hills, the plum is a pun on the Latin plumbum, for lead. While records do indicate that Thomas Horner became the owner of the {MANOR}, both his descendants and subsequent owners of Mells {MANOR} have asserted that the legend is untrue and that Wells purchased the deed from the abbey.>>
.
. I put in my thumb,
. And pulled out a plum,
. And said, "What a good boy am I!"
------------------------------------------------
. . . . . . Sonnet 37
.
. AS a decrepit father takes delight,
. To see his actiue childe do deeds of youth,
. So I, made lame by Fortunes dearest spight
. Take all my comfort of thy *WORTH and TRUTH*.
.
. For whether beauty, b[I]rth, or weal[TH, o]r wit,
. Or any [O]f these all, o[R] all, or more
. I[N]titled in th[E]ir parts, do c[R]owned sit,
. I make my loue ingrafted to this store:
.........................................
. . . . . . <= 11 =>
.
. F o r w h .e .t. h .e r b
. e a u t y, b [I] r .t h,o
. r w e a l. [T H,o.] r w i
. t,O r a n .y [O] f .t h e
. s e a l l, o [R] a .l l,o
. r m o r e .I [N] t .i t l
. e d i n t .h [E] i .r p a
. r t s,d o .c [R] o .w n e
. d s i t,I .m .a. k .e m y
. l o u e i .n .g. r .a f t
. e d t o t .h .i. s .s t o
. r e:

[I.HORNER] 10 : Prob. in any Sonnet ~ 1 in 70
..............................................
. So then I am not lame, poore, nor dispis'd,
. Whilst that this shadow doth such substance giue,
. That I in thy abundance am suffic'd,
. And by a part of all thy glory liue:
.
. Looke what is best, that best I wish in thee,
. This wish I haue, then ten times happy me.
--------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
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