I am not Andrew {CROOK}e

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Arthur Neuendorffer

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Crooke_and_William_Cooke
.
<<Andrew {CROOK}e (died 20 September 1674) and William Cooke (died 1641?) were London publishers of the mid-17th-century. In partnership and individually, they issued significant texts of English Renaissance drama, most notably of the plays of James Shirley. Andrew {CROOK}e was the son of a William {CROOK}e, a yeoman of Kingston Blount, Oxfordshire. On 26 March 1629, Andrew {CROOK}e won his "freedom" of the Stationers Company — that is to say, he gained full membership in the guild of London booksellers, publishers, and printers — and in time "became one of the leading publishers of his day." Perhaps his most notable solo achievements were the 1640 publication of the second edition of Ben Jonson's 1616 folio, and his editions of the Religio Medici of Sir [T]homas [BROWNE]. (Of the latter, {CROOK}e published two unauthorized editions in 1642, and the authorized and corrected edition of 1643, plus subsequent editions in 1645, 1648, 1656, 1659, 1669, and 1672). His currently best-known publication is Thomas Hobbes' scientific & political tract Leviathan.>>
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THE HISTORY OF The Valorous and Witty-KNIGHT-ERRANT,
Don-Quixote, of the Mancha.

... now newly Corrected and Amended. (1652)
LONDON, Printed by Richard Hodgkinsonne, for Andrew {CROOK}e.
...........................................................
CHAPTER LXXIII: Of the Presages and Forebodings which happened to Don Quixote
at the Entrance into his Village, with other Adventures, which serve for
Grace and Ornament unto this Famous History, and which give Credit unto it
.
Why then you have Money, my good Husband (replyed Teresa?) That's very
well. It is no matter how you came by it, bee i[T B]y hook o[R] {CROOK}:
F[O]r, after [W]hat man[N]er soev[E]r you have laid hands on it, you
bring no new custome into the world. Sanchica embraced her Father, and
asked him whether hee had brought her any thing; and that she had as
earnestly looked for him, as men doe for dew in the moneth of May.
..........................
. . . <= 7 =>
.
. . . . . .b e e i
. [T. B] y h o o k
. .o [R]{C R O O K}:
. .F [O] r,a f t e
. .r [W] h a t m a
. .n [N] e r s o e
. .v [E] r y o u h
. .a. v e l a i d
.
[T/BROWNE] 7 : Prob. 20,000 words to FINIS ~ 1 in 425
---------------------------------------------------------------
THE HISTORY OF The Valorous and Witty-KNIGHT-ERRANT,
Don-Quixote, of the Mancha.

... now newly Corrected and Amended. (1652)
LONDON, Printed by Richard Hodgkinsonne, for Andrew {CROOK}e.
...........................................................
The First Part by Thomas Shelton

The Princesse (gl)ORIANA of Great Britain,
to Lady Dulcinea del Toboso.
.........................................
But hap<PIES>t she, that mig{H}t so cleanly scap{E}
From Amadis, as th{O}u hast whilome do{N}e
From thy well mannered Knight, courteous Quixote:
O! were I she, I'de envie {N}o "{O}n{E}s" {H}a{P},
..............................................
. . . . . . <= 15 =>
.
. B u t h a p <P I E S>t s h e,t
. h a t m i g {H}t s o c l e a n
. l y s c a p {E}F r o m A m a d
. i s,a s t h {O}u h a s t w h i
. l o m e d o {N}e F r o m t h y
. w e l l m a. n n e r e d K n i
. g h t,c o u. r t e o u s Q u i
. x o t e:O!w. e r e I s h e,I'd
. e e n v i e {N}o{O}n{E}s{H}a{P},
.
{PHEON} 15,-2 : Prob. of both in a quatrain ~ 1 in 47,000
.........................................................
{A}nd had been merry, when I most did moan
{A}nd tane my pleasure, withou.t paying shot.
--------------------------------------------------------
. GANDALINE, A[M]adis of Gaules Squire,
. to Sancho Pan(ç)a, Don Quixotes Squire.
.
. H[A]il famous man! whom fortune hath so blist
. When first in Squi[R]e-like trade, it thee did place,
. As thou didst soft and sweetl[Y] passe disgrace,
. E're thou thereof the threatning danger wi[S]t.
.......................................................
. . . . . <= 49 =>
.
. GANDALINEA [M] adisofGaulesSquiretoSanchoPanaDonQuixo
. tesSquireH [A] ilfamousmanwhomfortunehathsoblistWhenf
. irstinSqui [R] eliketradeittheedidplaceAsthoudidstsof
. tandsweetl [Y] passedisgraceErethouthereofthethreatni
. ngdangerwi [S] t

[MARY S.] 49
------------------------------------------------------------------
[M]R. William
S(H)AK<ES>PE[A|R}ES
Comedi(E)s,
H<I>sto[R|I}es &
Traged(I)es,
<P>ubl[I|S}hed accor(D)ing to
t{H e} True Orig(I)nal Co<PIES>
.................................................
________ <= 17 =>
.
. [M]r. W i l l i a m S (H) A K <E S> P E
. [A|R} E S C o m e d I (E) s,H <I> s t o
. [R|I} e s&T r a g e D (I) e s <P> u b l
. [I|S} h e d a c c o r (D) i n .g. t o t
. {H e} T r u e O r i g (I) n a .l. C o <P I E S>

[MARI{He}] 17 : Prob. ~ 1 in 2000 (any skip)
(HEIDI) : German form of (ALICE)
-------------------------------------------------
TO THE ONLIE BEGETTER OF THESE INSUING SONNETS
.
________ <= 17 =>
.
. [M]r {W H}A L L {H} A .P. P I N E S S E
. [A|N) D T H A T {e} T {E} R N I T I E P
. [R|O) M I S E D {B}(Y){O} U R E V E R L
. [I|V) I N G P O {e}(T){W} I S H E T H T
. {H e} W E L L W .I (S){H} I N G
.
[MARI{He}] 17 : Prob. ~ 1 in 4700 (any skip)
------------------------------------------------
To the memory of my beloued,
The AVTHOR MR. WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE:
AND what he hath left vs.
................................................
Yet mus{T} I not giue Nature all: Thy A{R}t,
My gentle Shakespeare, m{U}st enioy a part.
For though {THE POETS} matter, Nature be,
{H}is Art doth giue the fashion.
................................................
. . . . . <= 22 =>
.
. Y e t m u s. {T} I n o t g i u e N a t u r e a
. l l:T h y A. {R} t,M y g e n t l e S h a k e s
. p e a r e,m. {U} s t e n i o y a p a r t.F o r
. t h o u g h. {T H E P O E T S} m a t t e r,N a
. t u r e b e, {H} i s A r t d o t h g i u e t h
. e f a s h i . o .n.
.
{TRUTH} 22
................................................
. Sweet swan of Avon! what a fight it were
. To see thee in our waters yet appea{r}e,
. And make thos{e} flights upon t{He} bankes of Tha[M]es,
. That so did t[A]ke Eliza, and ou[R] James !
. But stay, [I] see thee in t(He) {He}misphere
........................................
_____ <= 13 =>
.
. S w e e t .s w .a. n o f A v
. o n!w h a .t a .S. I G H t i
. t w e r e .T O .s. e E t h e
. e i n o u .R w .a. T e r s y
. e t a p p .e a {r} e,A n d m
. a k e t h .o s {e} f l i g h
. t s u p o .n t {H e} B a n k
. e S o f T .H a [M] e s,T h a
. T s o d I .d t [A] k e E l I
. z a,a N d .o u [R] J a m E s!
. B u T s t .a y [I] s e e t h
. e E i n t (H e){H e} m i s p
. H e r e
.
[MARI{He}] 13 : Prob. (at end) ~ 1 in 1524
..................................................
THE LA. [MARI]e [He]rbert COUNTESSE OF PEMBROOKE.
-----------------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 14
.
. NOt from the stars do I my iudgement plucke,
. And yet me thinkes I haue Astronomy,
. But not to tell of good,or euil lucke,
. Of plagues,of dearths,or seasons quallity,
. Nor can I fortune to breefe mynuits tell;
. Pointing to ea{C}h his thunder,raine and winde,
. Or say with Prince[S] if it shal go wel
. By oft predict that I in heauen f[I]nde.
. But from thine eies my knowledge I deriue,
. An[D] constant stars in them I read such art
. As {TRUTH} a[N]d beautie shal together thriue
. If from t{H}y self[E],to s{T}ore thou wo{U}ldst conue{R}t:
. Or else of {T}hee th[I]s I prognosticate,
. Thy end is {TRUTH}es and {BEAUTIE}s doome and date.
.............................................................
. . . . . . . <= 40 =>
.
. . . . . .P ointi .n g t o e a {C} hhi s thunderra i neandwind
. .e O r s a ywith .P r i n c e [S] ifi t shalgowel B yoftpredi
. .c t t h a tIinh .e a u e n f [I] nde B utfromthi n eeiesmykn
. .o w l e d geIde .r i u e A n [D] con s tantstars i nthemIrea
. .d s u c h artAs {T R U T H}a [N] dbe a utieshalt o getherthr
. .i u e I f fromt {H}y s e l f [E] tos{T}orethouwo{U}ldstconue
. {R}t O r e lseof {T}h e e t h [I] sIp r ognostica t eThyendis
. {T R U T H}esand {B E A U T I E} sdo o meanddate
.
[{C}SIDNEI] 40 : Prob. in Sonnets ~ 1 in 120
.............................................................
. . . <= 10 =>
.
. A s {T R U T H} a n d
. b e .a u t i e. s h a
. l t .o g e t h. e r t
. h r .i v e I f. f r o
. m t {H}y s e l. f e,t
. o s {T}o r e t. h o u
. w o {U}l d s t. c o n
. v e {R}t:O r e. l s e
. o f {T}h e e t. h i s
. I p .r o g n o. s t i
. c a .t e,T h y. e n d
. i s {T R U T H} e s a
. n d {B E A U T I E} s
. d o .o m e a n d d. a
. t e.
.
{TRUTH} -10
---------------------------------------------------------------
. Essays or Counsels I. Of [TRUTH]. (by Bacon)

WHAT is [TRUTH]? said jesting Pilate; and would not stay for
an answe[R]. Certainly there be that delight in giddiness,
and co[U]nt it a bondage to fix a belief; affecting free-will
in [T]hinking, as well as in acting. And though the sects of
p[H]ilosophers of that kind be gone, yet there remain certain
discoursing wits which are of the same veins, though there be not so
much blood in them as was in those of the ancient(S). But it is not
only the difficulty and labour which men take in finding out (O)f truth;
nor again that when it is found it imposeth upon men's thoughts; tha(T)
doth bring lie{S} in favour; but a natural though corrupt love of t{H}e
lie its(E)lf. One of the later school of the Greci{A}ns examineth the
matter, and is at a (S)tand to thin{K} what should be in it, that men
should love lies, wh{E}re neither (T)hey make for pleasure, as with
poets, nor for advantage, as with the merchant; but for the lie's sake.
But I cannot tell: this same truth is a naked and open day-light, that
doth not shew the masks and mummeries and triumphs of the world, half
so stately and daintily as candle-lights. Truth may perhaps come to the
price of a pearl, that sheweth best by day; but it will not rise to the
price of a diamond or carbuncle, that sheweth best in varied lights.
A mixture of a lie doth ever add pleasure.
......................................................
. . . . . <= 44 =>
.
. WHATis [T R U T H] saidjestingPilateandwouldnotstayf
. oranan. s w e[R]C .ertainlytherebethatdelightingiddi
. nessan. d c o[U]n .titabondagetofixabeliefaffectingf
. reewil. l i n[T]h .inkingaswellasinactingAndthoughth
. esects. o f p[H]i .losophersofthatkindbegone

[TRUTH] 44 : Prob. of [TRUTH] ~ 1 in 5,250
{SHAKE} 40
(SOTEST) 61
-----------------------------------------------------
<<{O}r spunne out Riddles, or weav'd fifty Tomes
__{O}f *LOGOGRIPHES*, or curious Palindromes;
__{O}r pump'd for those hard trifles, Anagrams,
__{O}r Ecrosticks, or your finer flames
__{O}f EGGES , and Halbards, Cradles, and a Herse,
__[A] paire of Sizers, and *a COMBE in verse* ;
__[A]crosticks, and *TELLESTICKS*, or jumpe names,>> - B. Jonson
-------------------------------------------------------------
*TELLESTICKS* found by Jones Harris & John Rollett
............................................................
The Names of the *26* Principall Actors in all these Playes.

[William Shakespeare]
Richard B(ū)rba(D)ge.
John Hemmings.
Augusti(ñ)e Phillip [S].
William Kemp [T].
Thom(ā)s Poop (e).
George Brya (N).
Henry C(O)n[D]el [L].
W(I)l(L)iam S(L) (Y|E).
{R}ichard Cowl [Y].
John Low(I)ne.
Samuell Crosse.
A(L|E]xander Co(O)k{E}.
---------------------------------------------------------------
*STONE*, n. [OE. ston, *STAN*; akin to OS. & OFries. *STEN*,
D. *STEEN*, G. stein, Sw. *STEN*, Dan. *STEEN*, Gr. a pebble.]
..........................................................
Prob. of 'St(e)nley' or 'St(a)nley' ~ 1 in 2,500,000
.................................................................
Prob. (at least) 6 of the 7[ST(e)NLEY] guys were Lord *STRANGE's*
Men while only (at most) 3 of the other 19 PA's were ~ 1 in 450
----------------------------------------------------------------
Samuel Gilburn{E}.
[R]obert Armi(N).
Will(I)am Ostl(E)r.
(N)athan Field.
............................
John Underwoo [D].
{N}icholas T(O)ole {Y}.
William Eccl[E]ston {E}.
Joseph Taylo {R}.
Robert Be[N]fiel {D}.
Robe(R)t Gough {E}.
Richar{D} Robinso {N}.
John Shancke.
John Rice.
------------------------------------------------------------
jumpe names?
.........................................................
. <= *26* =>
.
. [W i l l i a m S h a k e s p e a r e] R i c .h. a r d B
. (U) r b a D g e.J o h n H e m m i n g s.A u .g. u s t i
. (N) e P h i l l i p S W i l l i a m K e m p .T. T h o m
. (A) s P o o p e G e o r g e B r y a N H e n .r. y C o n
. [D] e l l.W i l L i a m S l Y E R i c h a r .d. C o w l
. [Y] J o h n L o w I n e.S a m u e l l C r o .s. s e.A l
. [E] x a n d e r C o O k E S a m u e l G i l .b. u r n E
. [R] o b e r t A r m i N W i l l i a m O s t .l. E r N a
. .t. h a n F i e l d.J o h n U n d e r w o o [D] N i c h
. .o. l a s T o o l e Y W i l l i a m E c c l [E] s t o n
. .e. J o s e p h T a y l o r.R o b e r t B e [N] f i e l
. .d.
.
(UNA) 26 : personification of "True Church" in Spenser's FQ
........................
[DYER] 26
[NED] -26
------------------------------------------------------------------
http://shakespeareauthorship.com/howdowe.html

In 1630 an anonymous volume was published, entitled A Banquet of
Jeasts or Change of Cheare. Jest no. 259 in this volume is as follows:

One travelling through Stratford upon AvOn, a Towne most remarkeable
for the birth of famous William Shakes[P]eare, and walking in
the Church to doe his devotion, es(PYE)d a thing t[H]ere worthy
observation, which was a tombestone laid more that thr[E]e hundr{ED}
{YEaR}s agoe, on which was ingraven an Epitaph to this purp[O]se,
I Thomas such a one, and Elizabeth my wife here under lye buried,
a[N]d know Reader I. R. C. and I. Chrystoph. Q.
are alive at this houre to witne[S]se it.
..............................................................
_______ . . . . . <= 55 =>

. OnetravellingthroughStratforduponAv .O. naTown emostr emarkea
. bleforthebirthoffamousWilliamShakes [P] earean dwalki nginthe
. ChurchtodoehisdevotionesPYEdathingt [H] erewor thyobs ervatio
. nwhichwasatombestonelaidmorethatthr [E] ehundr{EDYEaR}sagoeon
. whichwasingravenanEpitaphtothispurp [O] seITho massuc haonean
. dElizabethmywifehereunderlyeburieda [N] dknowR eaderI RCandIC
. hrystophQarealiveatthishouretowitne [S] seit

[PHEONS] 55 : Prob. (any skip) ~ 1 in 1250
.................................................
{E.DYEaR}/Dyer/Dyers/Dyar/Dier/Dyars/Dieres/Dire/Dires

http://www.houseofnames.com/dyear-family-crest
http://www.sourcetext.com/sourcebook/library/barrell/10dyer.htm
---------------------------------------------------------
TO.THE.ONLIE.BEGETTER.OF.
THESE.INSVING.SONNETS.
Mr.W.H. ALL.HAP[P]INESSE.
AND.T[H]AT.ETERNITI[E].
PROMISED.
BY.
[O]VR.EVER-LIVI[N]G.POET.
WISHETH.
THE.WELL-WISHING.
ADVENTVRER.IN.
SETTING.
FORTH.
T. T.
..........................................
1106d: OESS[PHEON]TSVN : Prob. ~ 1 in 511

http://shakespeareauthorship.com/array2.html
-------------------------------------------------
TO THE ONLIE BEGETTER OF THESE INSUING SONNETS
.
________ <= 17 =>
.
. [M]R {W H}A L L {H} A .P. P I N E S S E
. [A|N) D T H A T {e} T {E} R N I T I E P
. [R|O) M I S E D {B}(Y){O} U R E V E R L
. [I|V) I N G P O {e}(T){W} I S H E T H T
. {H e} W E L L W .I.(S){H} I N G
.
[MARI{He}] 17 : Prob. ~ 1 in 4700 (any skip)
..................................................
THE LA. [MARI]e {He}rbert COUNTESSE OF PEMBROOKE.
-------------------------------------------------
[M]R. William
S(H)AK<ES>PE[A|R}ES
Comedi(E)s,
H<I>sto[R|I}es &
Traged(I)es,
<P>ubl[I|S}hed accor(D)ing to
t{H e} True Orig(I)nal Co<PIES>
.................................................
________ <= 17 =>
.
. [M]R. W i l l i a m S (H) A K <E S> P E
. [A|R} E S C o m e d I (E) s,H <I> s t o
. [R|I} e s&T r a g e D (I) e s <P> u b l
. [I|S} h e d a c c o r (D) i n g t o t
. {H e} T r u e O r i g (I) n a l C o<P I E S>

[MARI{He}] 17 : Prob. ~ 1 in 2000 (any skip)
(HEIDI) : German form of (ALICE)
----------------------------------------------------
. Sweet swan of Avon! what a fight it were
. To see thee in our waters yet appeare,
. And make those flights upon the bankes of Tha[M]es,
. That so did t[A]ke Eliza, and ou[R] James !
. But stay, [I S]ee thee in t(He) {He}misphere
........................................
_____ . . <= 13 =>
.
. S w e e t .s w .a. n o f A v
. o n!w h a .t a .S. I G H t i
. t w e r e .T O .s. e E t h e
. e i n o u .R w .a. T e r s y
. e t a p p .e a .r. e,A n d m
. a k e t h .o s .e. f l i g h
. t s u p o .n t .H. e B a n k
. e S o f T .H a [M] e s,T h a
. T s o d I .d t [A] k e E l I
. z a,a N d .o u [R] J a m E s!
. B u T s t .a y [I S] e e t h
. e E i n t (H e){H e} m i s p
. H e r e
.
[MARI{He}] 13 : Prob. (at end) ~ 1 in 1524
-------------------------------------------------------
http://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/doc/PP_O2/complete/

THE PASSIONATE PILGRIME.
By W. Shakespeare. AT LONDON
Printed for W. Iaggard, and are to be sold by W. Leake,
at the Greyhound in Paules Churchyard. 1599.
..........................................
. By Christopher Marlowe
.
. LIue with me and be my Loue,
. And we will all the pleasures proue
. That hilles and vallies, dales and fields,
. And all the craggy mountaines yeeld.
. There will we sit vpon the Rocks,
. And see the Shepheards feed their flocks,
. By shallow Riuers, by whose fals
. M(E)lod(I)o(U)s bi(R)d{S} sing [M|A}adrig[A|L}s.
. The[R|E} will [I] {M}ake t{He}e a bed of Roses,
. With a thousand fragrant poses,
. A cap of flowers, and a Kirtle
. Imbrodered all with leaues of Mirtle.
. A belt of straw and Yuye buds,
. With Corall Clasps and Amber studs,
. And if these pleasures may thee moue,
. Then liue with me, and be my Loue.
.......................................
. . <= 6 =>
.
. .M. (E) l o d (I)
. .o. (U) s b i (R)
. .d. {S} s i n .g
. [M] {A} d r i .g
. [A] {L} s. T h e
. [R] {E} w. i l l
. [I] {M} a. k e t
. {H e} . e. a b e
. .d o. . f. R. o s
. .e s,

[MARI{He}] 6 : Prob. in Marlowe sonnet ~ 1 in 1765
--------------------------------------------------------
Don Quixote by Shelton : Epitaphs and Eulogies
http://www.bartleby.com/14/1003.html

The Academics of Argamasilla, a Town of the Mancha,
on the Life and Death of the Valorous Don Quixote
of the Mancha: Hoc Scripserunt

Caprichioso, the Most Ingenious Academic of Argamasilla,
in Praise of Rozinante, Don Quixote His Steed.

And if Gaul much her Amadis doth prize,
Whose brave descendants have illustred Greece,
And filled it full of trophies and of *FAME*;
[M]uch more Bellona’s court doth [S]olemnise
Quixote, whose like [I]n Gaul or Grecia is;
So honoure[D] none as in Mancha *HIS NAME*.
Let [N]o oblivion his glory stain,
Se[EI]ng in swiftness Rozinante h[I]s steed
Even Bayard doth, and Briliador exceed.
...................................................
. . . . . <= 25 =>
.
. [M] u c h m o r e B e l l o n a’s c o u r t d o t h
. [S] o l e m n i s e Q u i x o t e,w h o s e l i k e
. [I] n G a u l o r G r e c i a i s;S o h o n o u r e
. [D] n o n e a s i n M a n c h a*H I S N A M E*L e t
. [N] o o b l i v i o n h i s g l o r y s t a i n,S e
. [E] I n g i n s w i f t n e s s R o z i n a n t e h
. [I] s s t e e d E v e n B a y a r d d o t h,a n d B
. r i l i a d o r e x c e e d.
.
[M.SIDNEI] 25 : Prob. in Rozinante Eulogy ~ 1 in 16,000
---------------------------------------------------------------
<<Aubrey says of Lady [M]ary [SIDNEI]: "She was VERy salacious,
and she had a Contrivance that in the Spring of the yeare,
when the *STALLIONS* were to leape the Mares, they were to be
brought before such a part of the house, where she had a vidette
(a hole *to peepe* out at) to looke on them and please herselfe
with their Sport; and then she would act the like sport
herselfe with her *STALLIONS* . One of her great Gallants
was *{CROOK}e-BACK't Cecill* , Earl of Salisbury.">>
-----------------------------------------------------------------
. . . . . . Sonnet 125
.
. WEr't ought (TO M)e I "bore the canopy",
. With my ex(T)ern the outward honoring,
. O(R) layd great bases {For} etern(I)ty,
. Which proues more [S]hor(T) then wast or ruining?
. Haue [I] n(O)t seene dwellers on forme a(N|D] fauor
. Lose all,and more by payi[N]g too much rent
. For compound sw[E]et;Forgoing simple sauor,
. Pitt[I]full thriuors in their gazing spent.
. Noe,let me be obsequious in thy heart,
. And take thou my oblacion,poore but free,
. Which is not mixt with seconds,knows no art,
. But mutuall render onely me for thee.
. Hence,thou subbornd Informer, a trew soule
. When most impeacht,stands least in thy controule.
.......................................................
. . . . . . . . <= 23 =>
.
. W E r't o u g h t (T O M) e. I"b o r e t h e c a
. n o p y"W i t h m .y e x (T) e r n t h e o u t w
. a r d h o n o r i .n g,O (R) l a y d g r e a t b
. a s e s{F o r}e t .e r n (I) t y,W h i c h p r o
. u e s m o r e[S]h .o r t (T) h e n w a s t o r r
. u i n i n g?H a u .e[I]n (O) t s e e n e d w e l
. l e r s o n f o r .m e a (N)[D]f a u o r

(TRITON) 23 : (TOM) Lodge crest.
.......................................................
. . . . . . <= *26* =>
.
. {F o r} e t e r n i t y,W h i c h p r o u e s m o r e
. [S] h o r t t h e n w a s t o r r u i n i n g?H a u e
. [I] n o t s e e n e d w e l l e r s o n f o r m e a n
. [D] f a u o r L o s e a l l,a n d m o r e b y p a y i
. [N] g t o o m u c h r e n t F o r c o m p o u n d s w
. [E] e t;F o r g o i n g s i m p l e s a u o r,P i t t
. [I] f u l l t h r i u o r s i n t h e i r g a z i n g

{For}[SIDNEI] *26* [starting in the middle of the 3rd line]
........................................................
Shortest {For}[SIDNEI] or [SIDNEY] in KJV = 869 skip
--------------------------------------------------------
. . . . . . . Sonnet 47

. BEtwixt mine eye and heart a league is tooke,
. And each doth good turnes now vnto the other,
. When that mine eye is famisht {For} a looke,
. Or heart in loue with [S]ighes himselfe doth smother;
. W[I]th my loues picture then my eye [D]oth feast,
. And to the painted ba[N]quet bids my heart:
. An other tim[E] mine eye is my hearts guest,
. And [I]n his thoughts of loue doth share a part.
. So either by thy picture or my loue,
. Thy seife away,are present still with me,
. For thou nor farther then my thoughts canst moue,
. And I am still with them,and they with thee.
. Or if they sleepe, thy picture in my sight
. Awakes my heart,to hearts and eyes delight.
.......................................................
. . . . . . <= *26* =>
.
. {F o r} a l o o k e,O r h e a r t i n l o u e w i t h
. [S] i g h e s h i m s e l f e d o t h s m o t h e r;W
. [I] t h m y l o u e s p i c t u r e t h e n m y e y e
. [D] o t h f e a s t,A n d t o t h e p a i n t e d b a
. [N] q u e t b i d s m y h e a r t:A n o t h e r t i m
. [E] m i n e e y e i s m y h e a r t s g u e s t,A n d
. [I] n h i s t h o u g h t s
.
{For}[SIDNEI] *26* [starting in the middle of the 3rd line]
.
Prob. of second skip 26 {For}[SIDNEI] ~ 1 in 151,000
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.geocities.ws/garydanvers/PS-funeral.html

Sir Philip Sydney's funeral procession

When Sir Philip Sidney died of a wound received at the battle
of Zutphen (1586) his body was brought home to England for an
elaborate public funeral. The next year Thomas Lant published
a series of engravings of the funeral procession.

http://tinyurl.com/ptpxsdu

Pictures from The Procession at the Obsequies of Sir Philip Sidney,
drawn by his servant, Thomas Lant, and engraved by Theodor
Dirk de Bry, 1587 (From the series of 32 plates featuring

344 [= 172 pairs of = Sonnet 125 + Sonnet *47*]

engraved figures on a 38 foot long roll in the possession
of the Folger Shakespeare Library.)

http://michaelharrison.ws/sidney/
-----------------------------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 1
.
. FRom fairest creatures we desire increase,
. That thereby beauties Rose might neuer die,
. But as the riper should by time decease,
. His tender heire might beare his memory:
. But thou contracted to thine owne bright eyes,
. Feed'st (t)hy lights fla{M}e with selfe substantiall fewell,
. Making (a) famine where {A}boundance lies,
. Thy selfe thy foe, to thy sw(e)et selfe too c{R}uell:
. Thou that art now the worlds fresh or(n)ament,
. And onl{Y} herauld to the gaudy spring,
. Within thine (o)wne bud burie{S}t thy content,
. And tender chorle makst wast in niggarding:
. Pitty the world, or else this glutton be,
. To eate the worlds due, by the graue and thee.
........................................................
. . . . . . . <= *47* =>
.
. Feedst (t) hylightsfla {M} ewithselfesubstantiallfewell
. Making (a) faminewhere {A} boundanceliesThyselfethyfoet
. othysw (e) etselfetooc {R} uellThouthatartnowtheworldsf
. reshor (n) amentAndonl {Y} herauldtothegaudyspringWithi
. nthine (O) wnebudburie {S} tthycontent
.
{MARY S.} 47 : Prob. in first Sonnet ~ 1 in 380
(O : neat) -47
----------------------------------------------------------
Benson & Cotes's 1640 Sonnets publication
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Benson_%28publisher%29
......................................................
TO THE READ[E]R. The[R]e presu{M|E] (und[E]r f{A|V]o[U|R])
to p{R|E]s[E]nt to {Y|O|U|R] view {S|o]m[E] exce[L|L]ent and
sweetely composed Poems, of Master William Shakespeare, Which
in themselves appeare of the same purity, the Authour himselfe
then living avouched ; they had not the fortune by reason of
their Infancie in his death to have the due accomodatio of
proportionable glory with the rest of hi[S EVER-LIVIN(g) WOR]-
kes, yet the lines of themselves WILL afFORD you a more
authentick approbation than my assurance any way can, to invite
your allowance, in your perusall you shall find them Seren,
cleere and eligantly plaine, such gentle straines as shall recreate
and not perplexe your braine, no intricate or cloudy stuffe to
puzzell intellect, but perfect eloquence ; such as will raise your
admiration to his praise:this assurance I know will not differ from
your acknowledgment. And certaine I am, my opinion will be seconded
by the sufficiency of these *ENSUING* lines ; I have beene somewhat
s olicitus to *BRING this FORTH* to the perfect view of all men ;
and in so doing glad to be serviceable for the continuance
of glory to the *DE(s)ERVEd Author* in these his Poems.
......................................................
____ <= 8 =>
.
. . . . .T O T H. E
. .R[E]A D E R T. H
. .e[R]e p r e s. u
. {M|E]u n d[E]r. f
. {A|V]o[U|R]t o. p
. {R|E]s[E]n t t. o
. {Y|O|U|R]v i e *w*
. {S|o]m[E]e x c *e*
. [L|L]e n t a n *d*
. .s*w*e e t e l. y
. .c*o*m p o s e. d
. .P*o*e m s
.
{MARY S.} 8
[Lo. O., E. VERE] -8
[Lo. UERE] -9
.....................................
Prob. of [MARY S.] ~ 1 in 8,000
Prob. of 2[UERE]s ~ 1 in 1,800
Prob. of [EVERE] ~ 1 in 1,000

in the first 69 letters.
---------------------------------------------------------
http://shakespeareauthorship.com/monrefs.html

17th-century References to Shakespeare's Stratford Monument
by David Kathman

<<One of the 1623 First Folios in the Folger Shakespeare Library
(no. 26 according to the Folger numbering) contains 3 handwritten
poems on the last end page of the volume, written in a secretary
hand dating from approximately the 1620s. The first of these is
the poem from Shakespeare's monument in the Stratford church
("Stay passenger why go'st thou by so fast"). The second
is not recorded elsewhere, and goes as follows:
..............................................................
. Heere Shakespeare lyes w{H}[OME N]one but Death could *SHAKE*
. and he{E}re shall ly till judgeme[N]t all awake;
. {W}h[E]n the last tru[M]pet doth uncl[O]se hi{S} eyes
. the wi{T}tie{S}t po{E}t in {T}he w[O]rld [S]hall *RISE*.
.........................................................
. . . . . . . . . . <= 31 =>
.
. S h a k e s p e a r e l y e s w {H}[O M E N]o n e b u t D e a t
. h c o u l d*S H A K E*a n d h e {E} r e s h a l l l y t i l l j
. u d g e m e[N]t a l l a w a k e {W} h[E]n t h e l a s t t r u[M]
. p e t d o t h u n c l[O]s e h i {S} e y e s t h e w i{T}t i e{S}
. t p o{E}t i n{T}h e w[O]r l d[S] h a(L)l R I S E.
.
{HEWS} 31 : Prob. ~ 2 in 15
.........................................................
. . . . <= 12 =>
.
. .S h a k e s p e .a. r e l
. .y e(S)w h[O M E .N] o n e
. .b u t D e a t h .c. o u l
. .d*S H A K E*a n .d. h(E)e
. .r e s h a l l l .y. t i l
. .l j u d g e m e [N] t a l
. .l a w a k e(W)h [E] n t h
. .e l a s t t r u [M] p e t
. .d o t h u n c l [O] s e h
. .i s(E)y e s t h .e. w i{T}
. .t i e{S}t p o{E} t. i n{T}
. .h e w[O]r l d[S] h. a(L)l
. *R I S E*.
.
[NEMO] 12 : Prob. ~ 1 in 88
.....................................
. <= 4 =>
.
. e w i {T}
. (T) i e {S}
. (T) <P> o {E}
. (T) <I> n {T}
. (H) <E> w {O}
. r l d {S}
. h a l l
. *R I S E*.
..........................................
{SO TEST} -4 (Prob. skip <5 ~ 1 in 2580)
-----------------------------------------------------------
Dave Roper: "{SO TEST} Him, *I UOW* He Is Edward De Uere"
.............................................................
__ David L. Roper's *EUERE* Monument array

_______________ <= 34 =>

.{TER . R .A T .E [G] I T,P O . PULUSM. Æ R______ .ETOLYMPUSHABET}
......................................................................
. STA . Y .P A .S {S} E N G \E\ RWHYGO. E S______ .TTHOVBYSOFASTR
. EAD . I .F T (H){O} V C AN \S\ TWHOM [E] _ [N] . VIOVSDEATHHATH
. PLA. {S} T W (I){T} H{I}NTH \I\ SMON [U] (M) [E] .NTSHAKSPEAREW
. IT {H W H} O (M){E} Q{U}ICKN \A\ TVR [E D] (I) [D] EWHOSENAMEDO
. THD. {e} C K. Y {S} T{O}MBEFA \R\ MO [R E] t (H) . ENCOSTSIEHAL
. LYT. {H} E H. A {T} H{W}RITTLE \A\ V [E] S L .I . .VINGARTBVTPA
. GET . O .S E. R V E H ISWITT
....................................................................
[EUERE][DE] 34
{SO TEST} 34
{I UOW} 34 : VOVERE: to *VOW, PROMISE, DEDICATE*
{HeW} -34
.............................................................
http://shakespeareauthorship.com/array2.html

1306d: OOGLN{I UOW}VT : Prob. ~ 1 in 105
-------------------------------------------------------------
17th-century References to Shakespeare's Stratford Monument
http://shakespeareauthorship.com/monrefs.html
.
<<In 1631, a year before his death, John WeEVER published the massive
Ancient Funerall Monuments, which recorded many inscriptions from
monuments around England, particularly in Canterbury, Rochester,
London, and Norwich. Shakespeare's monument does not appear in the
published book, but two of WeEVER's notebooks, containing his drafts
for most of the book as well as many unpublished notes, survive as
Society of Antiquaries MSS. 127 and 128. In one of these notebooks,
under the heading "Stratford upon Avon," WeEVER recorded the poems
from Shakespeare's monument and his gravestone, as follows:
..........................................................
. Iudcio Pilum, Genio Socratem, Arte Maronem
. Terra tegit, populus maeret, Olympus habet.

.{S}tay Passenger, why go{E}s[T] thou by so fast
. Rea{D} i[F] your canst whome env[I]ous death hath plac'd
. [W]ithin this monument [S]hakespeare with who[M]e
. Quick Nature dy'd wh[O]se name doth deck his [T]ombe
. far more then co{S}t, sith all yt hee hath {W}ritt
. L(E)ave(S) liv(I)ng A(R)t but page to serve hi{S W}itt.
.
. ob Ano doi 1616 AEtat. 53. 24 die April
.
. Good frend for Iesus sake [F]orbeare
. To digg th{e d[U]s}t enclosed heare
. Bl[E]st bee ye man that spa[R]es these stones
. And c[U]rst bee hee that move[S] my bones.
.........................................................
In the margin opposite the heading "Stratford upon Avon",
WeEVER wrote "Willm Shakespeare the famous poet",
.
and opposite the last two lines of the epitaph
he wrote "vpo[n] the grave stone".>>
...................................................
____________ <= 18 =>
.
. {S} t .a. y P a s s e n g e r w h y g o
. {E} s [T] t h o u b y s o f a s t R e a
. {D} i [F] y o u r c a n s t w h o m e e
. .n. v [I] o u s d e a t h h a t h p l a
. .c. d [W] i t h i n t h i s m o n u m e
. .n. t [S] h a k e s p e a r e w i t h w
. .h. o [M] e Q u i c k N a t u r e d y d
. .w. h [O] s e n a m e d o t h d e c k h
. .i. s*[T] O M B E*f a r m o r e t h e n
. .c. o {S} t s i{T}h a l l y t h e e h a
. .t. h {W} r i t{T}L(E)a v e(S)l i v(I)n
. .g. A (R) t b u{T}p a g e t o s e r v e
. .h. i {S W} i t{T}
.
[TOM SWIFT] -18
{S.E.D.} 18
(RISE) -4
.
Prob. of [TOM SWIFT] ~ 1 in 2,230,000 (any skip)
.................................................
. . . <= 18 =>
.
. G O(O) D {F} r e n d f(O)r J e s u s s
. a k(E)[F]{O} r b e a r(E)T(O)d i g g t
. h{e d [U]{S} t e n c l(O)s(E)d h e a r
. e B l [E]{S} t b e e y(E)m a n t h a t
. s p a [R]{E} s t h e{S}e s t o n e s A
. n d c [U]_r .s t b e{E}h e e t h a t m
. o v e [S]_M .y b o n{E}s
........................................
{FOSSE} 18 : A grave (Old French)
[F. UERUS] 18 ~ 1 in 23,800 (any skip)
Prob. of *UERUS* ~ 1 in 1090 (any skip)
-----------------------------------------------
. . . . . <= 18 =>
.
. L e t t h e .b. i r d o f l o u d e s
. t l a y O n .t. h e s o l e A r a b i
. a n t r e e .H. e r a l d s a d a n d
. t r u m p e .t. b e T o w h o s e s o
. u n d c h a [S] t e w i n g s o b e y
. B u t t h o [U] s h r i e k i n g h a
. r b i n g e [R] F o u l p r e c u r r
. e r o f t h [E] f i e n d A u g u r o
. f t h e*F E [V] E R'S*e n d T o t h i
. s t r o u p [E] C O M E(t)h o u n o t
. n e a r
.
[E. VERUS {COME(s)}] -18
Prob. of [E. VERUS] ~ 1 in 12,240 (any skip)
..............................................
. [E]douardus [VERUS] , {COME(s)} Oxoniae,
. Vicecomes Bulbeck, Dominus de Scales
. & Badlismer, D. Magnus Angliae Ca-
. merarius: Lectori. S. D.
----------------------------------------------------------
http://shakespeareauthorship.com/monrefs.html

According to David Kathman:

17th-century References to Shakespeare's Stratford Monument
............................................................
1) 1630: There was no Stratford monument.

2) 1631: There were the poems of the Stratford monument including:

"Leaves living Art but pa[ge to serve his wit]t."

. pa[Ge to serve his Wit]t
. anagram
. [Geo. Wither vestis]

[vestis :(Latin) a garment, vesture; from vestio:
I clothe, dress.
I adorn, attire, deck.
I make emperor (i.e. clothe in imperial purple).]

3) 1634: There was (finally) in Stratford: "A *NEAT* Monument
of that famous English Poet, Mr. William Shakespeere"
---------------------------------------------------------
EPIGRAMS. BOOK I. The Author B. J.
http://hollowaypages.com/jonson1692epigrams.htm

Dedication:

To the great Example of Honour, and *VER(tu)E* , the most
Noble William, Earl of Pembroke, Lord Chamberla[I]n, &c.

MY LORD, WHil[E] {Y}ou cannot cha[N]ge your Merit, I [D]a{R}e
not change [Y]our Title: It wa[S] th{A}t made it, and not I.
Under which NA{M}E, I here offer to your Lordship
the ripest of my Studies, my Epigrams;

_________ <= 13 =>

. *V. E. R (t .u) E*,t h e m o s t
. .N. o. b. l .e. W. i l l i a m E
. .a. r. l. o .f. P. e m b r o k e,
. .L. o. r. d .C. h. a m b e r l a
. [I] n &c. M .Y. L. O R D,W H i l
. [E]{Y} o .u .c. a. n n o t c h a
. [N] g. e .y .o. u. r M e r i t,I
. [D] a {R} e .n. o. t c h a n g e
. [Y] o. u .r. T. i. t l e:I t w a
. [S] t. h {A} t. m. a d e i t,a n
. .d. n. o .t. I. U. n d e r w h i
. .c. h. N .A {M} E, I h e r e o f
. .f. e. r .t .o. y. o u r L o r d
. .s. h. i .p
.
[SYDNEI] -13
{MARY} -27
---------------------------------------------
LXV. (65) To my Muse.

AWay, and leave me, thou thing most abhor'd
That hast betray'd me to a worthless Lord;
[M]ade me commit most fircefierce Idolatry
To a gre[A]t Image through thy Luxury.
Be thy next Masters mo[R]e u(N)lucky Muse,
And, as thou'hast mine, his Hours, and [Y](O)uth abuse.
Get him the Times long grudg, the Cour(T)[S] ill will;
And Reconcil'd, keep him Suspected st(I)ll.
Make him lose all his Friends; and, which is wo(R)se,
Almost all ways, to any better course.
With me (T)hou leav'st an happier Muse than thee,
And which thou brought'st me, welcome Poverty.
She shall instruct my After-thoughts to write
Things manly, and not smelling Parasite.
But I repent me: Stay. Who e're is rais'd,
For worth he has not, He is tax'd, not prais'd.
...................................................
. <= 40 =>
.
. [M]a d e m e .commitmostfircefierceIdolatryToagr
. .e[A]t I m a .gethroughthyLuxuryBethynextMasters
. .m o[R]e u(N) luckyMuseAndasthouhastminehisHours
. .a n d[Y|O)u .thabuseGethimtheTimeslonggrudgtheC
. .o u r(T|S]i .llwillAndReconcildkeephimSuspected
. .s t(I)l l M .akehimloseallhisFriendsandwhichisw
. .o(R)s e A l .mostallwaystoanybettercourseWithme
. (T)h o u l e .avstanhappierMusethantheeAndwhicht
. .h o u b r o .ughtstmewelcomePoverty
.
[MARY S.] 41
(TRITON) -39 : Thomas Lodge crest.
..................................................
With me thou leav'st an happier Muse than thee,
And which thou brought'st me, welcome Poverty.
She shall in(S)truct my After-thoughts t(O) write
Things manly, and no(T) smelling Parasite.
But I r(E)pent me: Stay. Who e're is rai(S)'d,
For worth he has not, He is (T)ax'd, not prais'd.

(SO TEST) -22
Prob. of 5(SO TEST)s skip< 23 in Epigrams ~1 in 87
---------------------------------------------------------
Seventeenth-century References
to Shakespeare's Stratford Monument by David Kathman
http://shakespeareauthorship.com/monrefs.html

<<In 1634 a military company of Norwich was travelling through
the English countryside. One Lieutenant [Hammond] of the company
kept a diary of what he encountered during his travels, and
on or about September 9 he made the following entry:

In that dayes travell we came by Stratford upon Avon, where
in the church in that towne there are some monuments, which
church was built by Archbishop Stratford. Those worth
observing, and which wee tooke notice of, were these.

The monument of Sr. Hugh Clopton, who built tha(T) [S]trong
stone bridge of f(A|Y]re arches over that riv(E|R]. He was
Ld. Mayor of Londo(N). [A] (NEAT) monument of that f(A|M]ous
English poet, Mr. Wm. Shakespeere, who was borne heere.
.................................................
_____ . . <= 21 =>
.
. . . . . . . . . . . . .T h e m o n u m e n t
. o f S r.H .u. g. h C l o p t o n w h o b u i
. l t t h a (T)[S] t r o n g s t o n e b r i d
. g e o f f (A)[Y] r e a r c h e s o v e r t h
. a t r i v (E)[R] H e w a s L d.M a y o r o f
. L o n d o (N)[A](N E A T)m o n u m e n t o f
. t h a t f (A)[M] o u s E n g l i s h p o e t
. {M r.W m.S h a k e s p e e r e}w h o w a s
. b o r n e h e e r e.
.
[MARY,S.] -21 : Prob. ~ 1 in 1035
(A NEAT) -21
.................................................
And one of an old gentleman, a batchelor, Mr. Combe, upon whose
name the sayd poet did merrily fann up some witty and facetious
verses, which time would nott give us leave to sacke up.
----------------------------------------------------------------
_____ <= 51 =>
.
. *A NEA T MONUMENT* ofthatfamousEnglishPoetMrWmShakes P [E] ere
. {W} how A sbornehe ereAndoneofanoldGentlemanaBatchel O [R] MrC
. {O} mbe U ponwhose namethesaydPoetdidmerrilyfannupso M [E] wit
. {T} yan d facetiou sverseswhichtimewouldnottgiveusle A [V] eto
. {S} ack e up.
.
{STOW Monument}: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:John_Stow.jpg
[VERE] -51
-------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Stow
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ea/John_Stow.jpg

<<In 1561 John Stow (c. 1525 - 6 April 1605) published, The woorkes of Geffrey Chaucer, newly printed with divers additions whiche were never in printe before. This was followed in 1565 by his Summarie of Englyshe Chronicles. Stow having in his dedication to the edition of 1567 referred to the rival publication of Richard Grafton (c. 1500 - c. 1572) in terms, the dispute between them became extremely embittered.

Stow's antiquarian tastes brought him under ecclesiastical suspicion as a person "with many dangerous and superstitious books in his possession", and in 1568 his house was searched. An inventory was taken of certain books he possessed "in defence of papistry." In 1580, Stow published his Annales, or a Generale Chronicle of England from Brute until the present yeare of Christ 1580. Stow's Survey of London published in 1598, not only interesting for the quaint simplicity of its style and its amusing descriptions and anecdotes, but of unique value for its detailed account of the buildings, social condition and customs of London in the time of Queen Elizabeth I. A 2nd edition appeared in his lifetime in 1603, a 3rd with additions by Anthony Munday in 1618. Through the patronage of archbishop Matthew Parker, Stow was able to print the Flores historiarum of Matthew of Westminster in 1567, the Chronicle of Matthew Paris in 1571, and the Historia brevis of Thomas Walsingham in 1574. In the Chronicle of England 1590 Stow writes: "To The Honorable Sir John Hart, Lord Maior, The Chronicle written before that nothing is perfect the first time, and that it is incident to mankinde to erre and slip sometimes, but the point of fanta[s]tical fooles to preserve and continue in their errors."

Ben Jonson relates that Stow jocularly asked two mendicant cripples "what they would have to take him to their order." Stow was buried in the church of St Andrew Undershaft, where the monument erected by his widow, a terracotta figure of him, still remains. The pen held in the hand of his alabaster monument is renewed every three years by the Lord Mayor of the City of London.>>
---------------------------------------------------------
17-century References to Shakespeare's Stratford Monument
by David Kathman

http://shakespeareauthorship.com/monrefs.html

<<In 1658, two years after the publication of Dugdale's
Antiquities of Warwickshire, Sir Aston Cokain's collection
Small Poems of *DIVERS* Sorts contained a poem to Dugdale.
It was entitled "To my worthy, and learned Friend
Mr. William Dugdale, upon his Warwickshire
Illustrated," and it goes as follows:
......................................................
. Now Stratfor[D] upon Avon, we would choose
. Thy gentle and ing[E]nious Shakespeare Muse,
. (Were he among the li[V]ing yet) to *RAISE*
. T' ou{R} An(T)iquari(E|S) merit (S|O)m[E] jus(T) *PRAISE*:
. And sweet-tongu'd Drayton (th{A}t h[A]th given renown
. Unto a poor (before) and obscu[R]e town,
. Harsull) w{E}re he not fal'n *INTO HIS TOMB[E]*,
. Would crown this work with an Encomi{U}m.
. Our Warwick-shire the Heart of England is,
. As you most evidently {H}ave proved by this;
. Having it with more spirit dignifi'd,
. Then all our English Counties are beside.
. . [Shakspere Allusion Book, II, 71]>>
............................................
_ . . . <= 7 =>
.
. .T'o u{R}A n (T)
. .i q u a r i (E)
. (S)m e r i t (S)
. (O)m[E]j u s (T)
. *P R A I S E*
............................................
_______ <= 37 =>

. NowStratfor [D] uponAvonwewouldchooseThyg
. entleanding [E] niousShakespeareMuseWereh
. eamongtheli [V] ingyettoRAISETourAntiquar
. iesmeritsom [E] justPRAISEAndsweettongudD
. raytonthath [A] thgivenrenownUntoapoorbef
. oreandobscu [R] etownHarsullwerehenotfaln
.*INTOHISTOMB [E] WouldcrownthisworkwithanE
. ncomium.
.
. Our Warwick-shire t.he Heart of England is,
. As you most evidently {H}ave proved by this;
. Having it with more spirit dignifi'd,
. Then all our English Counties are beside.

[DEVEARE] skip 37: Prob. ~ 1 in 72,300
{H.UEARE} skip -54
-------------------------------------------------
Burial registry: July 6th 1604:

' [E]dward [VEARE] earl of Oxford',

' Edward [DEVEARE] Erle of Oxenford
. was buryed the 6th daye of Iulye Anno 1604'
............................................
The 1612 MINERVA BRITANNA *MENTE VIDEBOR*
______ anagram is clearly *DE VERE IN TOMB*
............................................
Within this monument Shakespeare with whome
Quick Nature dy'd whose name doth deck his Tombe
..............................................
Monstrous Adversary: The Life of Edward de Vere,
17th Earl of Oxford By Alan H. Nelson, p. 425

http://tinyurl.com/9vp9mpc

Of two surviving registers, one notes under burials:

. '[E]dward [VEARE] earl of Oxford',

A second register notes:

. 'Edward [DEVEARE] Erle of Oxenford
. was buryed the 6th daye of Iulye Anno 1604'
--------------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 38
.
HOw can my Muse WANT subiect to *INVENT*
While thou dost breath that poor'st into my *VERSE* ,
Thine owne sweet argument, to e{X}cell[E]nt,
F{O}r EVE[R]y vu{L}gar p[A]per to *reH[E]ARSE* :
Oh gi[V]e thy self[E] the thankes if ought in me,
WORTHy perusal stand against thy sight,
For who's *so dumbe* that cannot write to thee,
When thou thy selfe dost give *INVENTion* light?
............................................
_ . . . <= 9 =>
.
. t o e {X} c e l l [E]
. n t,F {O} r E U E [R]
. y v u {L} g a r p [A]
. p e r .t. o r e H [E]
. A R S .E. O h g i [V]
. e t h .y. s e l f [E]
. t h e .t. h a n k. e
. s i f .o. u g h t. i
. n m e,
.
[EVEARE] -9 : Prob. ~ 1 in 5 (in Sonnets)
{LOX} -9
------------------------------------------------------
20 May, 1857: Release of Hans Christian Andersen's
_AT VÆRE ELLER IKKE VÆRE_, 1857 - "To Be or Not to Be"
..............................................
*VAERE* = "to be" (Danish)
*VEARE* = edward earl of Oxford'
-------------------------------------------------------
.On Mr. Wm. Shakespeare.
. Poems, by J. D. with Elegies on the Authors Death.
. William Basse (c. 1622)
.
. Renowned Spencer lye a thought more nye
. To learned Chaucer, and rare Beaumond lye
. A little neerer Spenser, to make roome
. For Shak{E}speare in your threefold, fowerfol{D} Tombe.
.(To LODGE) all fowre in one bed m{A}ke a shift
. Untill Doomesdaye, for ha{R}dly will a sift
. Betwixt ys day and yt {B}y Fate be slayne,
. For whom your Curta{I}nes may be drawn againe.
. If yo(U)r prec{E}dency in death doth barre
. A fourth plac[E] in your sacred sepulcher,
. Under this carved ma[R]ble of thine owne,
. Sleepe, rare Tragoedian, Shak[E]speare sleep alone;
. Thy unmolested peace, unsh[A]red Cave,
. Possesse as Lord, not Tenant, of the Gra[V]e,
. That unto us and others it may be
. Honor hereafter to be layde by thee.
............................................
_______ <= 39 =>

. Ifyo (U) rprece dencyindeathdothbarreAfourth
. plac [E] inyour sacredsepulcherUnderthiscarv
. edma [R] bleoft hineowneSleeperareTragoedian
. SHAK [E] SPEARE sleepaloneThyunmolestedpeace
. unsh [A] redCav ePossesseasLordnotTenantofth
. eGRA [V] EThatu ntousandothersitmaybeHonorhe
. reaf .t. ertobe laydebythee.

[VAERE] -39
-------------------------------------------------
_______ <= 30 =>
.
. ForSHAK {E} SPEAREinyourthreefoldf
. owerfol {D} TombeToLODGEallfowrein
. onebedm {A} keashiftUntillDoomesda
. yeforha {R} dlywillasiftBetwixtysd
. ayandyt {B} yFatebeslayneForwhomyo
. urCurta {I} nesmaybedrawnagaineIfy
. oUrprec {E} dencyindeathdothbarreA
. fourthp .l. acEinyoursacredsepulcher
.
{E.DARBIE} 30 : Prob. ~ 1 in 10,300
................................................
http://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/A12017.0001.001?view=toc

<<The most lamentable Romaine tragedie of Titus Andronicus As it was plaide by the right honourable the {E}arle of {DARBIE}, Earl of Pembrooke, and Earl of Sussex their seruants.

London: Printed by Iohn Danter, and are to be sold by Edward White & Thomas Millington, at the little North doore of Paules at the signe of the Gunne, 1594.>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
George [WITHER] (11 June 1588 - 2 May 1667) poet,
. pamphleteer, & satirist clearly added the text:
.................................................
. Knew you not, traitors, I was limited
. For four and twenty years to b[R]eathe on [E]arth?
. And [H]ad you cu[T] my body w[I]th your s[W]ords,
. Or hewed this flesh and bones as small as sand,
. Yet in a minute had my spirit returned,
. And I had breathed a man made free from harm.
.................................................
. . . <= 8 =>
.
. .F. o r f o u r a
. .n. d t w e n t y
. .y. e a r s t o b
. [R] e a t h e o n
. [E] a r t h?A n d
. [H] a d y o u c u
. [T] m y b o d y w
. [I] t h y o u r s
. [W] o r d s,O r h
. .e. w e d t h i s
. .f. l e s h a n d
. .b. o n e s a s s
. .m. a l l a s s a
. .n. d,
.........................................
[WITHER] skip -8 : Prob. ~ 1 in 5900
............................................
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Wither
https://archive.org/stream/collectionofembl00withe#page/n11/mode/thumb
-----------------------------------------------------
. Richard II Act II, i (Quarto 1, 1597)
.
Gaunt: Ioine with the present sicknes that I haue,
. And thy vnkindnes be like {CROOK}ed age,
. To crop at once a too lon[G WITHER]ed flower,
. Liue in thy shame, but die not shame with thee,
. These words hereafter thy tormentors be,
. Convay me to my bed then to my graue,
. Loue they to liue that loue and honour haue.
-----------------------------------------------------
___ A Midsummer Night's Dream (Quarto 1, 1600)
.
Theseus: NOw faire Hippolita, our nuptiall hower
. Draws on apase: fower happy daies bring in
. An other Moone: but oh, me thinks, how slow
. This old Moone waues! She lingers my desires,
. Like to a Stepdame, or a dowager,
. Lon[G WITHER]ing out a yong mans reuenewe.
-------------------------------------------------
My *main* goal is to:
. . amuse myself with an interesting puzzle!

My work has already inspired Alan Green & Alexander Waugh
in their studies to locate buried Masonic Treasures:
---------------------------------------------------
There are at least 2 anti-Stratfordian cypher-mongers
who are attempting to make it *an exact science* by
claiming *a priori* where written evidence might lie:

1) Alan Green in the Stratford altar:
. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-2AaElwQP0
. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRSIQape79U

2) Alexander Waugh in Westminster Abbey "St. Blaise" altar:
. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uDlfct74HC4
. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HU2p1i4_2Rs
---------------------------------------------------
I much prefer having competent anti-Stratfordian
cypher-monger competition (than incompetent followers).
-------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
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