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Arthur Neuendorffer

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------------------------------------------------
____ The Tempest Act 1, Scene 2

PROSPERO: Silence! one word more
. Shall make me chide thee, if not hate thee. What!
. An advocate for (AN [IMPOST])er! hush!
. Thou think'st there is no more such shapes as he,
. Having seen but him and Caliban: foolish wench!
. To the most of men this is a Caliban
. And they to him are angels.
-------------------------------------------------------
____ Macbeth Act 3, Scene 4

LADY MACBETH: O proper stuffe:
. This is the very painting of your feare:
. This is the Ayre-drawne-Dagger which you said
. Led you to Duncan. O, these flawes and starts
.([IMPOST]ors to true feare) would well become
. A womans story, at a Winters fire
. Authoriz'd by her Grandam: shame it selfe,
. Why do you make such faces? When all's done
. You looke but on a stoole.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
September 8 => Feastday of St. ADRIAN (patron saint of *BUTCHERS*)
...................................................................
September 8, 1560, Amy Robsart BREAKS neck at bottom of staircase

September 8, 1573, {The Denial of Saint Peter} CARAVAGGIO born

September 8, 1601, Shakespeare's father, John, buried
September 8, 1608, Shakespeare's mother, Mary, dies

September 8, 1611, FORMAN SIMon dies: "(AN [IMPOST]), (AN [IMPOST])"
------------------------------------------------------------------
<<"MASONS were superior artisans brought over from Tyre to build
Solomon’s Temple. They were called [IMPOST]s because they were
Masons FREED from paying the usual taxes — or ‘[IMPOST]s’.>>
.....................................................
[IMPOST] , n. [L. impositum, impono.]

1. Any tax or tribute imposed by authority; particularly,
. a duty or tax laid by government on goods imported, and
. paid or secured by the importer at the time of importation.

2. In architecture, that part of a pillar in vaults and arches,
. on which the weight of the building rests; or the capital
. of a pillar, or cornice which crowns the pier and
. supports the first stone or part of an arch.
-------------------------------------------------------------
Alan W. Green: _I Shakespeare, Unanimous or Anonymous_ p.5-6

The line on the Stratford Monument in Super-Caps:

. {I}vdicio {P}ylivm, genio {S}ocratem, arte {M}aronem,
___ [T]erra tegit, popvlvs maeret, [O]lympvs habet
....................................................
[IMPOST] is the only perfect anagram for {IPSM[TO]}
--------------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josephus_problem

<<The Josephus problem is named after Flavius Josephus. According
to Josephus' account of the siege of Yodfat, he and his 40 comrade
soldiers were trapped in a cave, the exit of which was blocked by
Romans. They chose suicide over capture and decided that they would
form a circle and start killing themselves using *A STEP OF THREE*.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------------
If you form a circle with just 6 men named: {I, P, S, M, [T, O]}
and (starting with "I") select them using *A STEP OF THREE*
. . you get: [I, M, P, O, S, T] : [IMPOST]
................................................................
If you form a circle with just 4 men named: {I, P, S, M} and
(starting with "I") select them using *A STEP OF THREE*
. . you get: {I, M, P, S} : {IMPS}
----------------------------------------------------
. [TO] (th'Heliconi)([AN {IMPS}),
..................................
. (AN [IMPOST]) (th'Heliconi)
---------------------------------------------------------
Dedicatory Verse to Oxford in {SPENSER's} The Faerie Queene:
...................................................
. To the right Honourable the Earle of Oxenford,
. Lord high Chamberlayne of England. &c.
..........................................
. REc(E)ive most Noble Lord in gentle gree,
. The unripe fruit of an u(N)ready wit:
. Which BY THY COUNT{E|N}aunc[E| D}oth cra[V|e} to bee
. D[E]f(E)nded f[R]om foule [E]n{V|I}es poisnous bit.
. Which so to doe may th(E)e right w{E|L}l befit,
. Sith th'antique glory of thine auncest{R}y
.*Under a SHADY VELE* is therein writ,
. And eke thin{E} owne lon(G) living memory,
. Succeeding them in TRUE nobility:
. And also for the love, which thou doest beare
.[TO] (th'Heliconi)([AN {IMPS}), and they to thee,
. They unto thee, and thou to them most dear[E]:
. Deare as thou a[R]t unto thy self[E], so love
.{T}h{A}t {L}o[V]e{S} & honours the[E], as doth behove.
......................................................
[EVERE] 8,-13, 40 : Prob. 3[E.VERE]s skip ~ 1 in 2,250
-------------------------------------------------------------------
DEVIL'S DICTIONARY: [IMPOST]er n. A rival aspirant to public honors.
..............................................................
"And fill the world with follies and [IMPOST]ures." - Johnson.

[IMPOST] , n. [OF. [IMPOST], F. impot, LL. [IMPOST]us, fr. L. [IMPOST]us,
. p. p. of imponere to impose.] (Arch.) The top member of a PILLAR,
. pier, wall, etc., upon which the weight of an *ARCH* rests.

[IMPOST]er, n.
. [L. [IMPOST]or a deceiver, fr. imponere to impose upon, deceive.]
<<One who imposes on others; a person who assumes a character for
. the purpose of deception; a deceiver under a false character.>>
------------------------------------------------------
481 - How may a Lodge guard itself against *[IMPOST]ORS*?
http://www.freemason.com/library/defned16.htm

*[IMPOST]ors* in Masonry may be either profanes who, never
having been initiated, yet endeavor to pass themselves for regular
Freemasons, or Masons who, having been expelled or suspended from the
Order, seek to conceal the fact and still claim the privileges of
members in good standing. The false pretensions of the former class
are easily detected, because their real ignorance must after a proper
trial become apparent. The latter class, having once been invested
with the proper instructions, can stand the test of an examination;
and their true position must be discovered only by information derived
from the Lodges which have suspended or expelled them. The Tiler's
oath is intended to meet each of these cases, because it requires
every strange visitor to declare that he has been lawfully initiated,
and that he is in good standing. But perjury added to [IMPOST]ure will
gasily escape this test. Hence the necessity for the utmost caution,
and therefore the Charges of 1722 say, "You are cautiously to examine
a strange brother in such a method as prudence shall direct you, that
you may not be imposed on by an ignorant, false pretender, whom you
are to reject with contempt and derision, and beware of giving him
any hints of knowledge." The Masonic rule is, that it is better
that ninety and nine true brethren be rejected than
that one *[IMPOST]or* be admitted.
..........................................................
482 - What race performed the more humble labors
______ in the erection of the Temple?

*[IMPOST]S*. According to Masonic tradition the members of the secret
society of {Tyrian} artists, who were hired by King Solomon to erect
that sacred structure, in order to distinguish them from the Jews,
who performed the more humble labors, were honored with the
epithet of Free annexed to the name of builder or *MASON* ;
and being talented foreigners, were freed from the usual
*[IMPOST]s* paid to the state by the subjects of Solomon.
--------------------------------------------------------
____ Pericles Prince of {Tyre} Act 5, Scene 1

MARINA: It may be,
. You think me (AN [IMPOST])or: no, good faith;
. I am the daughter to King Pericles,
. If good King Pericles be.
-------------------------------------------------
____ All's Well That Ends Well Act 2, Scene 1

HELENA: I am not (AN [IMPOST])or that proclaim
. Myself against the level of mine aim;
. But know I think and think I know most sure
. My art is not past power nor you past cure.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Plays

<<The Book of Plays (The Bocke of Plaies and Notes therof p formans for Common Pollicie) is a section of a manuscript by the London astrologer {SIMON FORMAN} that records his descriptions of four plays he attended in 1610-11 and the morals he drew from them. The document is noteworthy for being the *only preserved eyewitness accounts of Shakespeare’s plays on the professional stage during his lifetime*: Macbeth at the Globe Theatre on 20 April 1610; The Winter's Tale at the Globe on 15 May 1611; and Cymbeline, date and theatre not specified. The fourth play described by Forman is a Richard II acted at the Globe on 30 April 1611; but from its description it covered the king’s earlier reign, and so was not Shakespeare's Richard II, first published 14 years earlier.

The notes were discovered in Forman’s extensive papers in or before 1832 by Philip Bliss or William H. Black. Joseph Hunter mentioned that Bliss had drawn his attention to them in the summer of 1832, and Black noted them on a proof-sheet of his catalogue of the Ashmole manuscripts. The description of MacBeth mentions characters "Ridinge", a detail that critics with a knowledge of Jacobean dramaturgy and stagecraft had found startling, although subsequent scholars, commenting on a horse evidently present on stage in another play, have opined that it is within the realm of possibility. Also the idea that Forman, a worldly-wise and canny operator, would spend his time drawing sententious morals from the stage plays he saw struck some modern critics as psychologically false, and in the 20th century suspicion emerged that the Book of Plays was one of John Payne Collier's forgeries, although Collier, who announced his discovery of the document in 1836, claimed to have used a transcription made for him by an unnamed "gentleman" (identified in 1841 by James Halliwell as W[illiam] H. Black, who catalogued the Ashmolean Collection).>>
..............................................
. . . . {SIMON FORMAN}
. . . {FR. MASON *NIMO*}
-------------------------------------------------------------------
. Schoenbaum, in WS: Records and Images, records that
. {SIMON FORMAN} died on Thursday, September 8, 1611:

<<after dinner, feeling very well, [SIMON FORMAN] took a pair of OARS
at Southwark to cross to PUDDLE Dock. While rowing in mid-stream
. he collapsed, crying "(AN [IMPOST]), (AN [IMPOST])", and died.
. A 'most sad' wind storm immediately followed the event.
. So FORMAN's friend, the astrologer William LILLY, reports.>>
.............................................................
<<The pity is that [Simon Forman's play note in his _Booke of Paies_]
are merely summaries of the plots, the doctor in _Macbeth_ being,
apparently, his favourite character. If only he had written a
description of the productions and of how Burbage played Macbeth and
Leontes he could so easily have won the fame for which he thirsted,
without the desperate recourse to SUICIDE A FEW WEEKS LATER,
on the day that he had predicted of his death.>>

. -F.E.Halliday _Shakespeare_ p.104.
--------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josephus#Manuscripts,_textual_criticism,_and_editions

<<For many years, the works of Josephus (c.37 – 100) were largely known in Europe only in an imperfect Latin translation from the original Greek. Only in 1544 did a version of the standard Greek text become available in French, edited by the Dutch humanist Arnoldus Arlenius. The first English translation, by [T]homas [LODGE], appeared in 1602, with subsequent editions appearing throughout the 17th century.>>
-----------------------------------------------------
. . . EPIGRAMS. *BOOK* I. The Author B. J.
...................................................
In 1608 Thomas Greene and his wife Leticia lived at
*NEW PLACE*, Stratford-on-Avon, had a son, William.
..................................................
64. To [Robert (Cecil) Earl of Salisbury. (May 4, 1608)]
. Upon the Accession of the Treasurership to him.
.
. NOt glad, like those that have new Hopes, or Suits,
. With thy *NEW PLACE* , bring I [T]hese ear[L]y Fruits
.[O]f Love, an[D] what the [G]olden Ag[E] did hold
. A Treasure, Art: Condemn'd in th' Age of Gold.
..................................................
. .ALICE Spencer (born May 4, 1559)
...................................
_ . . <= 8 =>
.
. *N E W P L A .C. E* (May 4, 1597)
. .b r i n g I [T] h
. .e s e e a r [L] y
. .F r u i t s [O] f
. .L o v e,a n [D] w
. .h a(T)t h e [G] o
. .l d(E)n A g [E] d
. .i d(H)o l d .A. T
. .r e(A)s u r .e,
.
[T.LODGE] 8 Prob. ~ 1 in 7250
---------------------------------------------
. . . Third Folio (1664)
.
https://tinyurl.com/y8ad2fvs
.
A Catalogue of all the Comedies, Histories,
. and Tragedies contained in this Book.
............................................
. Tragedies.
...............................
. (T)roylus and Cressida.
. (T)he Tragedy of Coriolanus.
. (T)itus Andronicus.
. . Romeo and J(U)li[E]t.
. . Timon of Athens.
. . The (T)ra[G]edy of Jul. Caes.
. . The Trage[D]y of Macbeth.
. . The Trag(E)dy [O]f Hamlet.
. . The Tragedy (O)f K. [L]ear.
. . The Moor of Venice.
. . An[Tho]ny and Cleopatra.
. {The Tragedy of Cymbeline}
............................................
. . . . . <= 21 =>
.
. (T)r. o y. .l. u s. a n d C r e s s i d a.T h e
. (T)r. a g. .e. d y. o f C o r i o l a n u s.T i
. (T)u. s A. .n. d r. o n i c u s.R o m e o a n d
. .J(U) l i. [E] t.T. i m o n o f A t h e n s.T h.
. .e(T) r a. [G] e d. y o f J u l.C a e s.T h e T
. .r a. g e. [D] y o. f M a c b e t h.T h e T r a
. .g(E) d y. [O] f H. a m l e t.T h e T r a g e d
. .y(O) f K. [L] e a. r.T h e M o o r o f V e n i
. .c e. A n. [T h o.] n y a n d C l e o p a t r a.
. {T h. e T. .r. a g. e d y o f C y m b e l i n e}
.
[Tho. LODGE] -21 : Prob. in "Tragedies" ~ 1 in 54,000
---------------------------------------------------------
<<In 1891, E.G. Fleay suggested Thomas Nashe had [Tho]mas [LODGE]
in mind in the section of Pierce Penilesse (1592) that describes
"The prodigall yoong Master" (margin) and begins "A yoong Heyre
or Cockney, that is his Mothers Darling, if hee haue playde the
waste-good at the Innes of the Court or about London....">>
---------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rood

<<(ROOD) is an archaic word for pole, from Old English rōd "pole", specifically "cross."
Rood was originally the only Old English word for the instrument of Jesus Christ's death. More precisely, the Rood or Holyrood was the True Cross, the specific wooden cross used in Christ's crucifixion. The word remains in use in some names, such as (HOLY|ROOD) Palace and the Old English poem The Dream of the (ROOD).

The phrase "by the (ROOD)" was used in swearing.>>
................................................
. . . Hamlet (Quarto 2 : 1604) Act 3, Scene 4.
.
Enter King and Polonius.
.
King: Loue, his affections doe not that way tend,
. Nor what he spake, though it lackt forme a little,
. Was not like madnes, there's something in his soule
. Ore which his melanc(HOLY) sits on b(ROOD),
. And I doe doubt, the hatch and the disclose
. Will be some danger; which for to preuent,
. I haue in quick determination
. Thus set it downe: he shall with speede to England,
. For the demaund of our neglected tribute,
. Haply the seas, and countries different,
. With variable obiects, shall expell
. This something setled matter in his hart,
. Whereon his braines still beating
. Puts him thus from fashion of himselfe.
................................................
. . . Hamlet (Quarto 2 : 1604) Act 3, Scene 1.

Ham. What's the matter now?

Ger. Haue you forgot me?

Ham. No by the (ROOD) not so,
. You are the Queene, your husbands brothers wife,
. And would it were not so, you are my mother.
------------------------------------------------------------
In his Frontline essay, William Murphy
mentions *THOMAS LODGE* once & only once:
......................................................
. . Thirty-Six Plays in Search of an Author
by William M. Murphy, Union College Symposium 1964
..................................................................
<<All the known evid[E]nce points to the Stratfo[R|D} Shakespeare
. as t(HE W)rit[E|R} of Hamlet, Macbeth, Henry [V], {A}nd the
. other plays an(D) p{O|E|M}s that have kept t(HE W)(O)r{L|D|A}t
. the author's knees *f(O)r almost four hundred yea(R)s* .>>
....................................................
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . <= 22 =>
.
. A l l t h e k .n. o. w n e .v. i .d [E] n. c e p o i
. n t s t o t h .e. S. t r a .t. f .o [R]{D} S h a k e
. s p e a r e a (S) t (H E W) r. i .t [E]{R} o f(H)a m
. l e t,M a c b .e. t. h,H e .n. r .y [V]{A} n d t h e
. o t h e r p l .a. y. s a n (D) p {O}[E]{M} s t h a t
. h a v e k e p .t. t (H E W)(O) r {L}[D]{A} t t h e a
. u t h o r's k .n. e. e s f (O) r *A. L .M. O S T F O
. U R H U N D R .E. D. Y E A (R) S*
.............................
{L.O.} . -22
[DEVERE] -22
{DRAMA} . 22
(ROOD). .-22
(HEWS). . -4
..................................................................
<<It should be apparent to anyone possessing normal common sense,
then, that {Shakespeare's authorship} of the works is not merely
"pro[B]able" or "likely," as some softhe[A]ds have put it, but
absolutely [C]ompelling. Yet it is common kn[O]wledge that after
Delia [BACON] published her vague notions about authorship in
1856 defenders of her unorthodox views and creators of others
multiplied like rabbits, and any reader of the modern newspaper
knows that the tribe increases every year.>>
....................................................
________ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . <= 25 =>
.
. {S h a k e s p e a r e's a u t h o r s h i .p} o f t
. .h e w o r k s i s n o t m e r e l y"p r o [B] a b l
. .e"o r"l i k e l y"a s s o m e s o f t h e [A] d s h
. .a v e p u t i t,b u t a b s o l u t e l y [C] o m p
. .e l l i n g.Y e t i t i s c o m m o n k n [O] w l e
. .d g e t h a t a f t e r D e l i a [B A C O N] p u b
. .l i s h e d h e r v a g u e n o t i o n s
.
[BACON] 25 : Prob. stuck on [BACON] ~ 1 in 325
.............................................................
There are those, like Delia Bacon, who are afflicted with what
has been called the "Corporation Syndrome," holding that such
distinguished literature mu(S)t be the work of a com{M}i[T]tee.
Its members w{O}u[L]d include, in addi{T}i[O]n to BACON and Oxfor[D],
Robert GREENE, Geor[G]e PEELE, Samuel DANI[E]L, Thomas NASHE,
*THOMAS LODGE*, Michael Drayton, and Thomas Dekker.
....................................................
_____ . . <= 17 =>
.
. .m u (S) t .b. e t h e w o r k o f a c
. .o m {M} i [T] t e e.I t s m e m b e r
. .s w {O} u [L] d i n c l u d e,i n a d
. .d i {T} i [O] n t o B a c o n a n d O
. .x f .o. r [D] R o b e r t G r e e n e,
. .G e .o. r [G] e P e e l e,S a m u e l
. .D a .n. i [E] l,T h o m a s N a s h e,
. *T H .O. M .A. S L O D G E*

[T.LODGE] 17 : Prob. stuck on *THOMAS LODGE* ~ 1 in 100,000
{TOM(S)} -17
-------------------------------------------------------------
http://deveresocietyaustralia.wordpress.com/silexedra/

<<*SILEXEDRA* at Fisher’s Folly of Bishopsgate was Edward de
Vere’s little writing factory full of his early band of frontmen.
This period lasted 1580-88/91. The *SILEXEDRA* motley crew included:

• [T]homas [LODGE] – “Rosalynde: Euphues Golden Legacy, Found After
.. His Death In His Cell At *SILEXEDRA*” (based on As You Like It).
.<<Lodge would later reminisce about the Silexedra years in his novel
. Euphues's Shadow. In a prefatory epistle to the book, Lodge noted
. how “Euphues repent the prime of his youth misspent in *FOLLY* and
. virtuously end the winter of his age in *SILEXEDRA*.>> - Mark Anderson
--------------------------------------------------------
. Meres's Palladis Tamia; Wits Treasury,
. Being the Second Part of Wits Commonwealth (1598)
.
... the best for Comedy amongst vs bee,

. Edward Earle of Oxforde,

. Doctor Gager of Oxforde,
. Maister Rowley once a rare Scholler of learned *PEMBROOKE Hall*,
. Maister Edwardes one of her Maiesties Chappell,
. eloquent and wittie Iohn Lilly,
. *LODGE*,
. Gascoyne,
. Greene,
. Shakespeare,
. Thomas Nash,
. Thomas Heywood,
. Anthony Mundye OUR BEST PLOTTER,
. Chapman,
. Porter,
. *WILSON*,
. *HATHWAY*, and Henry Chettle.
--------------------------------------------------------------
A January 17, 1579 entry in the
. Stratford Church Register: marriage of
. "William *WILLSONNE* and
. Anne *HATHAWAY* of Shotterye."
........................................................
. January 17 : St. Anthony's Day: <<On this day in the
. age of Queen Elizabeth, a sick pig would be led to
. the dung-heap and was not allowed to be slaughtered.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------
david kathman wrote:

<<In 1596, *THOMAS LODGE* in his *WITS MISERy* mentioned
the "ghost which cried so MISERably at the Theatre,
*like an OISTER-WIFE*, 'HAMlet, REVEnge'.">>
-------------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Lodge

<<THOMAS LODGE (1558 - September 1625) was an English dramatist.
He was born at West HAM, the second son of Sir Thomas Lodge,
who was Lord Mayor of the City of London in 1562-1563.

Young Thomas served as *PAGE* to the Stanleys, Earls of Derby,
until approximately 1571, when he enrolled in the
Merchant-Taylors' School. From there he went on to
Trinity College, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1577.>>
-------------------------------------------------
Ben Jonson (1623) _To the Memory of Shakespeare_
.............................................
My Shakespeare, rise; I will no{T LODGE} thee by
Chaucer, or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lye
A little further, to make thee a roome :
Thou art a Moniment, without a TOMBe,
.............................................
Shine *FORTH*, thou Starr{E O}f Poets, and wi[T]h rage,
Or inf[L]uence, chide, [O]r cheere the [D]rooping Sta[G]e;
Which, sinc[E] thy flight fro' hence, hath mourn'd like night,
And despaires day, but for thy Volumes light.
.............................................
. . . . <= 11 =>
.
. S h i n e*F O R T H* t
. h o u S t a r r{E O} f
. P o e t s,a n d w i [T]
. h r a g e.O r i n f [L]
. u e n c e,c h i d e,[O]
. r c h e e r e t h e [D]
. r o o p i n g S t a [G]
. e;W h i c h,s i n c [E]
. t h y f l i g h t
.
[T LODGE] 11 : Prob. at end of poem ~ 1 in 18,000
..................................................
(Shortest positive ELS [T LODGE] skip in KJV = 25)
------------------------------------------------------
Source: http://tinyurl.com/lju45g7
https://archive.org/stream/poeticalworksofw00bass#page/114/mode/2up
.
. ELEGY ON SHAKESPEARE,
. From Lansdowne MS.(777) TEMP. James I.
......................................................
. On Mr. Wm. Shakespeare
. HE DYED IN APRILL 1616
.
. Renowned Spencer lye a thought more nye
. To learned Chaucer, and rare Beaumond lye
. A little neerer Spenser, to make roome
. For *SHAK{E}SPEARE* in your threefold, fowerfol{D} Tombe.
.(To LODGE) all fowre in one bed m{A}ke a shift
. Untill Doomesdaye, for ha{R}dly will a sift
. Betwixt ys day and yt {B}y *FATE* be slayne,
. For whom your Curta{I}nes may be drawn againe.
. If yoUr prec{E}dency in death doth barre
. A *FOURTH* place in your sacred sepulcher,
. Under this carved marble of thine owne,
. Sleepe, rare Tragœdian, Shakespeare, sleep alone;
. Thy unmolested peace unshared Cave,
. Possesse as Lord, not Tenant, of thy Grave,
. That unto us & others it may be
. Honor hereafter to be layde by thee.
.
. . . . . . . . . - Wm. Basse
.....................................
_______ . <= 30 =>
.
. For *SHAK {E} SPEARE* inyourthreefoldf
. owe .rfol {D} TOMBE To LODGEallfowrein
. one .bedm {A} keash if tUntillDoomesda
. yef .orha {R} dlywi ll asiftBetwixtysd
. aya .ndyt {B} yFATE be slayneForwhomyo
. urC .urta {I} nesma yb edrawnagaineIfy
. oUr .prec {E} dency in deathdothbarreA
. FOU .RTHp .l. acEin yo ursacredsepulcher
.
{E.DARBIE} 30 : Prob. ~ 1 in 10,300
..........................................................
http://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/A12017.0001.001?view=toc

<<The most lamentable Romaine tragedie of Titus Andronicus
As it was plaide by the right honourable the {E}arle of {DARBIE},
*Earl of PEMBROOKE* , and Earl of Sussex their seruants.

London: Printed by Iohn Danter, and are to be sold by
Edward White & Thomas Millington, at the little North
(DOORe) of Paules at the signe of the Gunne, 1594.>>
.....................................................
(Shortest positive ELS {DARBIE} skip in KJV = 33)
------------------------------------------------------
http://pages.uoregon.edu/rbear/muses.html

. THE TEARES OF THE MUSES (1591) BY ED. Sp.
. (dedicated to *[ALICE S]PENCER*, Countess of Derby)
.......................................................
All places the/Y/ with follie have possest,
And with vaine toyes the vulgar[E] entertaine;
But me have banished, with all the rest
That whi[L]ome wont to wait upon my traine,
Fine Counterfesaunce and u[N]hurtfull Sport,
Delight and Laughter deckt in seemly sort.

[A]ll these, and all that els the comick stage
With seasoned wi[T] and goodly pleasance graced,
By which mans life in his like[S]t image
Was limned *FORTH*, are wholly now defaced;
And those s[W]eete wits which wont the like to frame
Are now despizd, and made a laughing game.

And he, the man whom Nature selfe had made
To mock her selfe, and *TRUTH* to imitate,
With kindly counter under *MIMICK SHADE* ,
Our p{LE(a)SANT WILLY}, ah! *IS DEAD* of late:
With whom all joy and jolly meriment
Is also deaded, and in dolour drent.
...................................................
. p{LE(a)SANT WILLY}
. {WILL STANLEY}
.......................................................
______ . . <= 49 =>
.
. Allplacesth e/Y/ withfolliehavepossestAndwithvainetoy
. esthevulgar [E] entertaineButmehavebanishedwithallthe
. restThatwhi [L] omewonttowaituponmytraineFineCounterf
. esaunceandu [N] hurtfullSportDelightandLaughterdeckti
. nseemlysort [A] lltheseandallthatelsthecomickstageWit
. hseasonedwi [T] andgoodlypleasancegracedBywhichmansli
. feinhislike [S] timageWaslimnedFORTHarewhollynowdefac
. edAndthoses [W] eetewitswhichwonttheliketoframeArenow
. despizdandm .a. dealaughinggame
.
[W.STANLE/Y}] -49 :
Prob. near to {Our p-LE(a)SANT WILLY} ~ 1 in 32,000
...................................................
In stead thereof scoffing Scurrilitie,
And scornfull Follie with Contempt is crept,
Rolling in rymes of shameles ribaudrie
Without regard, or due decorum kept;
Each idle wit at will presumes to make,
And doth the learneds taske upon him take.

But that same gentle spirit, from whose pen
Large streames of honnie and sweete nectar flowe,
Scorning the boldnes of such base-borne men,
Which dare their follies *FORTH* so rashlie throwe,
Doth rather choose to sit in idle cell,
Than so himselfe to mockerie to sell.
---------------------------------------------------
http://www.bartleby.com/331/186.html
.
. Rosalynde (1590) by *THOMAS LODGE*
_Phoebe's Sonnet, a Reply to Montanus' Passion_

. When Love was first begot,
. And by the *moVER's WILL*
. Did fall to human lot
. His solace to fulfil,
. Devoid of all deceit,
. A chaste and holy fire
. Did quick[E]n man's conce[I]t,
. And women's [B]reast inspi[R]e.
. The gods th[A]t saw the goo[D]
. That mortal{S} did approve,
.{W}ith kind and holy mood
. Began to talk of Love.
...................................
. . . . . . . <= 11 =>
.
. D i d q u i c k [E] n m
. a n's c o n c e [I] t,A
. n d w o m e n's [B] r e
. a s t i n s p i [R] e.T
. h e g o d s t h [A] t s
. a w t h e g o o [D] T h
. a t m o r t a l {S} d i
. d a p p r o v e,{W} i t
. h k i n d a n d .h. o l
. y m o o d
.
[{W.S.} DARBIE] -11 : Prob. in song ~ 1 in 3,650,000
.......................................................
But during this accord,
A wonder *STRANGE* to hear,
Whilst Love in deed and word
Most faithful did appear,
False-semblance came in place,
By Jealousy attended,
And with a double face
Both love and fancy blended;
Which made the gods forsake,
And men from fancy fly,
And maidens scorn a make,
Forsooth, and so *WILL I*.
..................................................
. Epilogue _ROSALYNDE OR, EUPHUES' GOLDEN LEGACY_
.
If you grace me with that favor, you encourage
me to be more forward; and as soon as I have
overlooked my labors, expect the Sailor's Calendar.
.
. *T. LODGE. FINIS*
-----------------------------------------------------------
Was *THOMAS LODGE* the *PAGE* that served W.S.'s WIT?
........................................................
Job 31:32 The *STRANGER* did no{T LODGE} in the street:
. but I opened my (DOORes) to the trauailer.
-----------------------------------------------------------
. . CYNTHIA'S REVELS: ACT I SCENE I. -- Ben Jonson
.
CUPID: So Hercules might challenge priority of us both, because
. he can throw [T]he bar farther, or [L]ift more join'd st[O]ols at
. the arm's en[D], than we. If this mi[G]ht carry it, then w[E], who
. have made the whole body of divinity tremble at the twang of our bow,
. and enforc'd Saturnius himself to lay by his curled front, thunder,
. and three-fork'd fires, and put on a masking suit, too light
. for a reveller of eighteen to be seen in --
....................................................
. . . . . <= 15 =>
.
. h e c a n t h r o w [T] h e b a
. r f a r t h e r,o r [L] i f t m
. o r e j o i n'd s t [O] o l s a
. t t h e a r m's e n [D],t h a n
. w e.I f t h i s m i [G] h t c a
. r r y i t,t h e n w [E],

[T.LODGE] 15
--------------------------------------------------
. . Henry IV, Part 1 (Q1, 1598) Act I, scene iii
.
EARL OF WORCESTER: Peace coosen, say no more.
. And now *I WILL UNCLASPE a SECRET BOO{K}E* ,
. And to your quicke conce{I}uing discontents
. Ile rea{D|E] you matter deepe and daun[G]erous,
. As full of perill an[D] aduenterous spirit,
. As to [O]rewalke a Current roring [L]owd,
. On the vnstedfast foo[T]ing of a *SPEARE*.
....................................................
____ . . . . . . . . . . . . <= 22 =>

. *U N C L A S P E a S E C R E T B O O {K} E* A n
. .d t o y o u r q u i c k e c o n c e {I} u. i n
. .g d i s c o n t e n t s I l e r e a {D}[E] y o
. .u m a t t e r d e e p e a n d d a u. n [G] e r
. .o u s,A s f u l l o f p e r i l l a. n [D] a d
. .u e n t e r o u s s p i r i t,A s t. o [O] r e
. .w a l k e a C u r r e n t r o r i n. g [L] o w
. .d,O n t h e v n s t e d f a s t f o. o [T] i n
. .g o f a*S P E A R E*.

{KID}. . . 22 : Or sporting {KID}, or Marlowes mighty line.
[T.LODGE] -22 (one of 6 *SPEARE*s) (only *SECRET BOOKE*)
........................................
Meres: "As {I|TALY) had {DANTE}, Boccace, Petrarch, ...
. so England had {T}homas {WATSO\n\}, Thomas {KID}, ..."
-----------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Kyd

<<Thomas Kyd (baptised 6 November 1558; buried 15 August 1594) was an English playwright, the author of The Spanish Tragedy. In October 1565 the young {KID} was enrolled in the newly founded Merchant Taylors' School, whose headmaster was Richard Mulcaster. Fellow students included Edmund Spenser and [T]homas [LODGE].>>
...................................................
<<Ur-Hamlet is a play thought to be by Thomas {KID}. The play is known to have been staged in London, more specifically at The Burbages' Shoreditch Playhouse as recalled by [T]homas [LODGE]. The play is known to have a character named Hamlet; the only other known character from the play is a ghost who cries, "Hamlet, revenge!"
----------------------------------------------------------
Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. by Washington Irving.
http://www.bartleby.com/109/6.html

. . THE MUTABILITY OF LITERATURE.
. . A COLLOQUY IN WESTMINSTER ABBEY.

I had taken down a little thick quarto, curiously bound in
parchment, with brass *CLASPS*, and seated myself at the table
in a venerable elbow-chair. Instead of reading, howEVER, I was
beguiled by the solemn monastic air and lifeless quiet of the
place, into a train of musing. As I looked around upon the old
volumes in their mouldering covers, thus ranged on the shelves
and apparently nEVER disturbed in their repose, I could not but
consider the library a kind of literary catacomb, where authors,
like mummies, are piously entombed and left to blacken and
moulder in dusty oblivion.

While I sat half-murmuring, half-meditating, these unprofitable
speculations with my head resting on my hand, I was thrumming
with the other hand upon the quarto, until I accidentally
loosened the *CLASPS*; when, to my utter astonishment, the
little book gave two or three yawns, like one awaking from
a *DEEP* sleep, then a husky hem, and at length began to talk.
.....................................................................
“Ah,” said the little quarto, with a heavy sigh, “I see how it is;
these modern scribblers have superseded all the good old authors.
I suppose nothing is read now-a-days but Sir Philip [SIDNEY]’s
Arcadia, Sackville’s stately plays, and Mirror for Magistrates,
or the fine-spun euphuisms of the ‘unparalleled John Lyly.”’

“There you are again mistaken,” said I; “the writers whom you
suppose in vogue, because they happened to be so when you were last
in circulation, have long since had their day. Sir Philip [SIDNEY]’s
Arcadia, the immortality of which was so fondly predicted by
his admirers, and which, in truth, is full of noble thoughts,
delicate images, and graceful turns of language, is now
scarcel[Y E]ver me[N]tione[D]. Sackv[I]lle ha[S] strutted
into obscurity; and even Lyly, though his writings were
once the delight of a court, and apparently perpetuated
by a proverb, is now scarcely known even by name.
......................
. . <= 6 =>
.
. s .c a. r c e
. l [Y E] v e r
. m e [N] t i o
. n e [D] S a c
. k v [I] l l e
. h a [S] s t r
. u t .t. e d
............................................................
"My very good sir," said the little quarto, yawning most drearily
in my face, "excuse my interrupting you, but I perceive you are
rather given to prose. I would ask the fate of an author who
was making some noise just as I left the world. His reputation,
however, was considered quite temporary. The learned shook their
heads at him, for he was a poor, half-educated varlet, that knew
little of Latin, and nothing of Greek, and had been obliged to
run the country for deer-stealing. I think his name was
Shakespeare. I presume he soon sunk into oblivion."

"On the contrary," said I, "it is owing to that *VERy man* that
the literature of his period has experienced a duration beyond the
ordinary term of English literature. There rise authors now and
then who seem proof against the mutability of language because
they have rooted themselves in the unchanging principles of
human nature. They are like gigantic trees that we sometimes
see on the banks of a stream, which by their vast and *DEEP* roots,
penetrating through the mere surface and laying hold on the VERy
foundations of the earth, preserve the soil around them from
being swept away by the EVER-flowing current, and hold up many
a neighboring plant, and perhaps WORTHless WEED, to perpetuity.
Such is the case with Shakespeare, whom we behold defying the
encroachments of time, retaining in modern use the language and
literature of his day, and giving duration to many an indifferent
author, merely from having flourished in his vicinity. But even
he, I grieve to say, is gradually assuming the tint of age,
and his whole form is overrun by a profusion of commentators,
who, like clambering vines and creepers, almost
*bury the NOBLE plant* that upholds them."
.........................................................
{W}hat (D)reary waste{S} of m(E)taphysics! H[E]re a(N)d there o(N)ly
[D]o we behold th(E) he[A]ven-illumine(D) ba[R|D)s, elevated like
[B|E)acons on their w[I|D)ely-separated h[E|I)ghts, to transmit
(T)he pure light of poetical intelligence from age to age."

I was just about to launch *FORTH* into eulogiums upon the poets
of the day, when the sudden opening of the (DOOR) caused me to
turn my head. It was the VERgEr, who came to inform me that
it was time to close the library. I sought to have a parting
word with the quarto, but the worthy little tome was silent;
the *CLASPS* were closed: and it looked perfectly
unconscious of all that had passed.
.........................................................
. . . . <= 15 =>
.
. {W} h. a t(D)r e a r y w a s t e
. {S} o. f m(E)t a p h y s i c s!H
. [E] r. e a(N)d t h e r e o(N)l y
. [D] o. w e b e h o l d t h(E)h e
. [A] v. e n-i l l u m i n e(D)b a
. [R](D) s,e l e v a t e d l i k e
. [B](E) a c o n s o n t h e i r w
. [I](D) e l y-s e p a r a t e d h
. [E](I) g h t s,t o t r a n s m i
. .t.(T) h e p u r e l i g h t o f
. .p.{O} e t i c a l i n t e l l i
. .g.{E} n c e f r o m a g e t o a
. .g. e.
.
(NED) -15,15 : Prob. both in array ~ 1 in 150
(DEDIT) 15 : He gave (Latin)
[{W.S.} E.DARBIE] 15
.
Prob. of [{W.S.} E.DARBIE] in last 2 sentences ~ 1 in 57,000,000.
---------------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
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