Waldegrave [1587]

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Arthur Neuendorffer

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Jun 27, 2012, 2:55:22 PM6/27/12
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My own method of ELS cipher evaluation is basically:

1) at least one 5+ letter proper name ELS in
2) a prominent but short text involving
3) fairly clear authorship issues that
4) replicates a similar cipher pattern seen previously.

Using those criteria, this Ovid epilogue is about as good
as I, myself, can come up with involving Oxford:
-----------------------------------------------------------------
______ <= 34 =>
.
Y e t s h a l l t h e b e t t e r p a r t o f M [E] a s s u r e d b e
t o c l i m b A l o f t a b o v e t h e S T A R [R] Y s k y.A n d a l
l t h e w o r l d s h a l l n e v e r B e a b l [E] f o r t o q u e n
c h m y n a m e.F o r l o o k h o w f a r s o E [V] E R T h e R o m a
n e m p i r e b y t h e r i g h t o f c o n q u [E] s t s h a l l e x
t e n d,S o f a r s h a l l a l l f o l k r e a [D] t h i s w o r k.

[DEVERE] -34 Prob. (w. skip < 35) ~ 1 IN 725 (for full 12 line
epilogue):
................................................................
http://www.archive.org/stream/restitutaortitle02bryd/restitutaortitle02bryd_djvu.txt

The end of the XV. Book of Ovid's Metamorphosis.

("Arthur Golding" translation : reprinted by B. Waldegrave [1587])

Now have I brought a work to end which neither Jove's fierce wrath,
Nor sword, nor fire, nor fretting age with all the force it hath
Are able to abolish quite. Let come that fatal hour
Which (saving of this brittle flesh) hath over me no power,
And at his pleasure make an end of mine uncertain time.
Yet shall the better part of M[E] assured be to climb
Aloft above the STAR[R]Y sky. And all the world shall nEVER
Be abl[E] for *to quench my name* . For look how far so E[V]ER
The Roman empire by the right of conqu[E]st shall extend,
So far shall all folk rea[D] this work. And time without all end
(If poets as by prophecy about the TRUTH may aim)
My life shall EVERlastingly be lengthened still by *FAME* .

Finis Libri decimi quinti.
Laus et honor soli Deo.

At London,

Imprinted by Robert Walde-grave.
-----------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.elizabethanauthors.org/goldBio.htm

The XV Bookes of P. Ouidius Naso, entytled Metamorphosis, translated
oute of Latin into English meeter. Dedicated "To Robert, Earl of
Leicester, from Barwicke, the xx. of Aprill, 1567." Willyam Seres,
printer. Quarto. 400 pages. London, 1567.

Reprinted in 1575 by Seres;
1584 by John Windet and Thomas Judson;
1587 by B. Waldegrave;
1593 by John Danter;
1593 by W. W. (William White);
1603 by W. W.;
1612 by Thomas Purfoot.

(Ovid, "Metamorphoses" 15.984-95, tr. Golding)
Concluding nine lines of Ovid's _Metamorphoses_ translated:
http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/1830690
http://www.williamshakespeare-sonnets.com/sonnet-55
-----------------------------
I have come across equally interesting (at least to me) finds for
Bacon, Rutland, Neville, and Sackville but I have either been unable
to contact proponents of these authorship candidates or I have been
told point blank that they are not interested in ciphers (at least my
ciphers). C'est la vie.

Art Neuendorffer

Robin G.

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Jun 29, 2012, 2:41:43 AM6/29/12
to
On Wednesday, June 27, 2012 11:55:22 AM UTC-7, Arthur Neuendorffer wrote:
> My own method of ELS cipher evaluation is basically:
>
> 1) at least one 5+ letter proper name ELS in
> 2) a prominent but short text involving
> 3) fairly clear authorship issues that
> 4) replicates a similar cipher pattern seen previously.
>
> Using those criteria, this Ovid epilogue is about as good
> as I, myself, can come up with involving Oxford:

ART, YOUR METHOD IS WORTHLESS BECAUSE YOU CAN MANIPULATE THINGS TO YOUR PREDETERMINED RESULTS. THIS IS VERY DIANA PRICE OF YOU.



> I have come across equally interesting (at least to me) finds for
> Bacon, Rutland, Neville, and Sackville but I have either been unable
> to contact proponents of these authorship candidates or I have been
> told point blank that they are not interested in ciphers (at least my
> ciphers). C'est la vie.

AGAIN, ART, GIVEN THAT YOU FIND DE VERE, BACON, RUTLAND, NEVILLE AND SACKVILLE IN EXAMPLES PROVES YOUR METHOD IS WORTHLESS. IT'S LIKE GIVING TYPEWRITERS TO MONKEYS AND THINKING THEY WILL WRITE SHAKESPEARE. YOU ARE DUMB ENOUGH TO BELIEVE THIS IS POSSIBLE. WHEN IT COMES RIGHT DOWN TO IT, THE MONKEYS ARE SMARTER THAN YOU.

Message has been deleted

Arthur Neuendorffer

unread,
Jun 29, 2012, 10:23:13 AM6/29/12
to
> Arthur Neuendorffer wrote:
>>
>> My own method of ELS cipher evaluation is basically:
>
>> 1) at least one 5+ letter proper name ELS in
>> 2) a prominent but short text involving
>> 3) fairly clear authorship issues that
>> 4) replicates a similar cipher pattern seen previously.
>
>> Using those criteria, this Ovid epilogue is about as good
>> as I, myself, can come up with involving Oxford:

"Robin G." <doc...@proaxis.com> wrote:
>
> ART, YOUR METHOD IS WORTHLESS BECAUSE
> YOU CAN MANIPULATE THINGS TO YOUR PREDETERMINED RESULTS.

BACON, RUTLAND, NEVILLE, SACKVILLE & T.ROSS were predetermined?

"Robin G." <doc...@proaxis.com> wrote:
>
> THIS IS VERY DIANA PRICE OF YOU.

Thank you, Robin.

> Arthur Neuendorffer wrote:
>>
>> I have come across equally interesting (at least to me) finds for
>> Bacon, Rutland, Neville, and Sackville but I have either been unable
>> to contact proponents of these authorship candidates or I have been
>> told point blank that they are not interested in ciphers
>> (at least my ciphers). C'est la vie.

"Robin G." <doc...@proaxis.com> wrote:
>
> AGAIN, ART, GIVEN THAT YOU FIND DE VERE, BACON, RUTLAND, NEVILLE
> AND SACKVILLE IN EXAMPLES PROVES YOUR METHOD IS WORTHLESS.

It proves that I am trying to be as unbiased as possible.

(It is also forcing me to be more of a groupist.)

"Robin G." <doc...@proaxis.com> wrote:
>
> IT'S LIKE GIVING TYPEWRITERS TO MONKEYS
> AND THINKING THEY WILL WRITE SHAKESPEARE.
----------------------------------------------------
<<Poor Poet-Ape, that would be thought our chief,
Whose works are e'en the frippery of wit,
From brokage is become so bold a thief,
As we, the robbed, leave rage, and pity it.
At first he made low shifts, would pick and glean,
Buy the reversion of old plays; now grown
To a little wealth, and credit in the scene,
He takes up all, makes each man's wit his own.
And, told of this, he slights it. Tut, such crimes
The sluggish gaping auditor devours;
He marks not whose 'twas first, and after-times
May judge it to be his, as well as ours.
Fool, as if half eyes will not know a fleece
From locks of wool, or shreds from the whole piece.>>
--------------------------------------------------
http://www.sirbacon.org/firstbaconian.htm

THE FIRST BACONIAN
By Lord Sydenham of Combe
(Reprinted from Baconiana, February 1933)

For many years the authorship of the "Shakespeare" literature aroused
no interest, and the few people who knew the secret kept silence.
The Elizabethan period produced several playwrights of note, and
the transcendent qualities of the master mind were beyond grasp
of all except a small group of highly cultured men of letters.

Samuel Pepys, a shrewd critic and an admirer of "Shakespeare," born
nine years after the appearance of the First Folio, wrote that he
had read Othello "which I ever esteemed a mighty good play; but, he
significantly added, " after having so lately read 'the Adventures
of Five Houres,' it seems a mean thing." Posterity formed a
different opinion; but many other persons in Pepy's day
probably had as little sense of values as the diarist.

Ben Jonson's appparently contradictory views have supplied much blank
ammunition to Stratfordians, though they can easily be explained. When
the bright new light rose on the horizon, he seems to have discerned
a dangerous rival, and was moved either to scorn or to pettifogging
cavils. From an "epigram" published in the year of Shakspere's death,
but written some time before, he appears to have reached the
conclusion that the player was but a broker of other men's goods, and
passed off others' works as his own. His words bear no other meaning :

"Poor Poet Ape, that would be thought our chief,
Whose works are e'en the frippery of wit,
From Brokage is become so bold a thief-
As we, the robbed, leave rage and pity it."

The "epigram" goes on to say that the broker had
"now grown to a little wealth and credit on the scene"
In Every Man Out of his Humour Jonson presented Shakspere
as Sogliardo, son of a farmer, "an essential clown,"
who is made to say :

"I have been so toiled among the harrots yonder, you will not
believe, they do speak in the strangest language and give a man the
hardest terms that you ever knew....I' faith I thank God I can write
myself a gentleman now; here's my patent; it cost me thirty pounds
by this breath."

It was in 1597 that John Shakspere, or Shagspere, obtained a coat
of arms from the "harrots" (heralds) after much misrepresentation,
and the identification appears complete.

Jonson, however, came to work with Bacon, and assisted in bringing
out the First Folio. The magnificient panegyric introducing the
collected Plays is admitted by Stratfordians to be his work.
The "Poor Poet Ape," from being a "thief" had become
"THE AUTHOR" of whom Jonson could say

"Leave thee alone for the comparison
Of all that insolent Greece or haughtie Rome
Sent forth,on since did from their ashes come."
-------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
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