"to see the ivy"

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Arthur Neuendorffer

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Jul 29, 2021, 3:07:35 PMJul 29
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http://www.bbc.com/news/education-35973094

<<There is a stage direction in King Lear, which, in the
early part of the print run, says rather cryptically
"H {EDIS}", which is then updated in later copies to
"He dis" before it is finally corrected to "He dies".>>
-----------------------------------------------------
. "H {EDIS}" : {You ("H") *PUBLISH*}.
..................................................
_______ Sonnet 102 (Only Sonnet's *PUBLISH*)
.
. MY LOVE IS Strengthned though more weake in seeming
. I love not lesse, thogh lesse the show appeare,
. That love is marchandiz'd, whose ritch esteeming,
.
. The own[E]rs tongu[E] (DOTH} PUB[L]ISH {E}VER[Y] {WH}E{R}E
. O)u[R] lov{E} was [N]ew, and th[E]n but in t[H]e spring,
.
.{WH}en I was wont to greet it with my laies,
. As Philomell in summers front doth singe,
. And stops his pipe in growth of riper daies:
. Not that the summer is lesse pleasant now
. Then when her mournefull himns did hush the night,
. But that wild musick burthens *EVERy bow* ,
. And sweets growne common loose their deare delight.
. Therefore like her, I some-time hold my tongue:
. Because I would not dull you wiTH MY SONGE.
..................................................
. . . . . <= 8 =>
.
. . .T h. (E) .o w .n. [E]
.. r s t. (O) .n g .u. [E]
. (D O T. {H} .P U .B. [L]
.. I S H. {E} .V E .R. [Y]
. {W. (H}E{R}E O) . u. [R]
.. l o v. {E} .w a .s. [N]
.. e w,a . n . d t .h. [E]
.. n b u . t . i n .t. [H]
.. e s p . r . i n .g, {W H}
.
. Sidney friend/Queen's Champion:
[HENRY LEE] -8 : Prob. in any Sonnet ~ 1 in 1765
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https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Henry_Danvers%2C_1st_Earl_of_Danby

<<On the night of the death of the 17th Earl of Oxford [June 24, 1604]
Baron [H]enry [DANUERS], the Earl of Southampton and Sir Henry Neville as
well as the a [LEE] were arrested by order of the king and Privy Council.
.......................................................................
Baron [DANUERS] had been employed in Ireland under the Earl of Essex, and
Charles Blount, 8th Baron Mountjoy, successive lords-lieutenant of Ireland.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------
http://91.1911encyclopedia.org/S/SH/SHAKESPEARE.htm
http://www.stratford-upon-avon.org/images/memorial.jpg

<<The Stratford bust & monument must have been erected
on the N. wall. The design in its general aspect was one
often adopted by the "tombe-makers" of the period, and
according to Dugdale was executed by a *Fleming* resident
in London since 1567, Garratt Johnson (Gerard JANssen), who
was occasionally a collaborator with *{N}ICHOLAS {STONE}*,
Esq., (fellow Freemason Warden with [W]illiam [H]erbert).
.............................................................
. Gerard JANssen / NICK Stone

. Q1 Rossencraft Gilderstone
. Q2 Rosencrans Guyldensterne
. F1 Rosincrane Guildensterne
. F2,3,4 Rosincross(e) Guildenstare

. Rosy Cross Stone Guild
. Rosicrucians Freemasons / the Craft
----------------------------------------------------------------
. "Moore C W The Freemasons Monthly Magazine Vol IV 1845"
....... https://tinyurl.com/yykurxjk
.
GRAND MASTERS, OR PATRONS, OF THE FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS IN ENGLAND,
from the coming in of the Saxons to the year 1839, Compiled and
condensed from the most authoritative records, by Br. Thomas Joseph
Tennison, President of the Masonic Council of Armagh, Ireland.
........................................................................
1607: James I., a Brother Mason, Grand Patron by Prerogative, appointed
. Inigo {IONES}, Grand Master of England, in which capacity he served
. for 11 years. His Wardens were M(aste)r [W]illiam [H]erbert the
. Earl of Pembroke, & *{N}ICHOLAS {STONE}*, Esq., who, attended by
. many Brothers attired in Craft clothing, walked to White Hall,
. and laid the first stone of the Banquetting Hall, with knocks,
. huzzas, and sound of trumpets, throwing a purse of gold upon
. the {STONE} for the operatives to drink “To the King and Craft!"
.
1618.[W]illiam [H]erbert, Earl of Pembroke, was chosen Grand Master.
. He appointed Inigo {IONES} his Deputy.
.
. Charles I., a Royal Mason and Grand Patron by Prerogative;
. under him [H]enry [DANVERS], Earl of Danby, who erected
. the beautiful gate of the Physick Gardens, at Oxford.
.
1630-1-2. [H]enry [DANVERS] , Earl of Danby.
----------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Oxford_Botanic_Garden

<<The University of Oxford Botanic Garden is the oldest botanic garden in Great Britain and one of the oldest scientific gardens in the world. The garden was founded in 1621 as a physic garden growing plants for medicinal research. Today it contains over 5,000 different plant species on 4 1⁄2 acres. It is one of the most diverse yet compact collections of plants in the world and includes representatives from over 90% of the higher plant families.

In 1621, [H]enry [DANUERS], 1st Earl of Danby, contributed £5,000 to set up a physic garden for "the glorification of the works of God and for the furtherance of learning". He chose a site on the banks of the River Cherwell at the northeast corner of Christ Church Meadow, belonging to Magdalen College. Part of the land had been a Jewish cemetery until the Jews were expelled in 1290. Four thousand cartloads of "mucke and dunge" were needed to raise the land above the flood-plain of the River Cherwell.

On 12 March 1622 [DANUERS] conveyed to the university of Oxford five acres of land, opposite Magdalen College. He had the ground raised and enclosed within a high wall. The gateway of the Oxford Botanic Garden, designed by *{N}ICHOLAS {STONE}*, a master mason who frequently worked with Inigo (IONES), still bears the following inscription, 'Gloriae Dei Opt. Max. Honori Caroli Regis, in usum Acad. et Reipub. Henricus comes Danby DD. MDCXXXII.' By his will he left the rectory of Kirkdale in Yorkshire towards the maintenance of the gardens.

The Danby gateway to the Botanic Garden is one of three entrances designed by *{N}ICHOLAS {STONE}*. It is one of the earliest structures in Oxford to use early Baroque style. In this highly ornate arch, Stone ignored the new simple classical Palladian style currently fashionable, which had just been introduced to England from Italy by Inigo (IONES).

The gateway consists of three bays, each with a pediment. The largest and central bay, containing the segmented arch is recessed, causing its larger pediment to be partially hidden by the flanking smaller pediments of the projecting lateral bays. The stone work is heavily decorated being bands of alternating vermiculated rustication and plain dressed stone. The pediments of the lateral bays are seemingly supported by circular columns which frame niches containing statues of Charles I and Charles II in classical pose. The tympanum of the central pediment contains a segmented niche containing a bust of [H]enry [DANUERS] Earl of Danby.

The Garden was the site of frequent visits in the 1860s by Oxford mathematics professor Lewis Carroll and the Liddell children, Alice and her sisters. Like many of the places and people of Oxford, it was a source of inspiration for Carroll's stories in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. The Garden's waterlily house can be seen in the background of Sir John Tenniel's illustration of "The Queen's Croquet-Ground".

The Queen of Hearts and Alice in the Garden, the waterlily house in the background.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/e/e9/Alice-queen-hearts.jpg/800px-Alice-queen-hearts.jpg

Another Oxford professor and author, J. R. R. Tolkien, often spent his time at the garden reposing under his favourite tree, Pinus nigra. The enormous Austrian pine was much like the Ents of his The Lord of the Rings story, the walking, talking tree-people of Middle-earth.>>
----------------------------------------------------------
. . . . . . KJV Psalm *46*
.
. . "SHAKE" is the *46*th word from the beginning,
. . and "SPEAR" is the *46*th word from the end.
-----------------------------------------------------------
. First Folio (1623)
. TO THE MEMORIE of the deceased Authour
. Maister W. SHAKESPEARE.
.
. SHake-speare, at length thy pious fellowes giue
. The world thy Workes: thy Workes, by which, out-liue
. Thy Tombe, thy name must: when that {STONE} is rent,
. And Time dissolues thy {STRATFORD MONIMENT},
. Here we aliue shall view thee still. This Booke,
. When Brasse and Marble fade, shall make thee looke
. Fresh to all Ages: when Posteritie
. Shall loath what's new, thinke all is prodegie
.*THAT I{S} NOT S[H]AKE-SPEARES; {E}V'RY LINE*, each Verse
. Here shall reuiu{E}, rE[D]eeme thee from thy Herse.
. Nor Fire, nor cankring Age, a{S N|A]so said,
. Of his, {T}hy wit-fraught B{O}oke shall once i{N}vadE.
.[N|O}r shall I {E}'re beleeve, or thinke thee dead.
.(Though mis{T}) [U]nt{I}ll our bankrout Stage be sped
.(Impossible) with som[E] new straine t' out-do
.{P}assions of Iuliet, and her Romeo;
.{O}[R] till I heare a Scene more nobly take,
.{T}hen when thy half=[S|WORD} parlying Romans spake.
.{T}ill these, till any of thy (v)olumes rest
. Shall with more fire, more feeling be expr{E}st,
. Be sure, our Shake=speare, thou canst n[EVER DYE],
. But cr{O}wn'd with Lawrell, liue eternally.
.
. . . . . . . . . --- [L]. [DIGGES].
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
. . . . . . . . . . . . . <= *46* =>
.
. SHakespeareatl e. n g t h .thypi. o u s f e l l o w e s g i u e T h e .worl
. dthyWorkesthyW o. r k e s .bywhi. c h o u t l i u e T h y T o m b e,t .hyna
. memustwhenthat S. T O N E .isren. t A n d T i m e d i s s o l u e s t .hyST
. RATFORDMONIMEN T. H e r e .weali. u e s h a l l v i e w t h e e s t i .llTh
. isBookeWhenBra s {S}e a n .dMarb. l e f a d e,s h a l l m a k e t h e .eloo
. keFreshtoallAg e {S W}h e .nPost. e r i t i e S h a l l l o a t h w h .atsn
. ewthinkeallisp r {O}d{E}g .ieTha. t I{S}N O T*S[H]A K E S P E A R E S* eury
. LineeachVerseH e {R}e s{H} allre. u i u{E}r E[D]e e m e t h e e f r o .mthy
. HerseNorFireno r {C}a n k .ringA. g e a s{N|A]s o s a i d O f h i s t .hywi
. tfraughtBookes h [A]l l o .ncein. u a d E[N|O}r s h a l l I e r e b e .leeu
. eorthinketheed e [A]d T h .oughm. i s T[U]n t{I}l l o u r b a n k r o .utSt
. agebespedImpos s. i b l e .withs. o m[E]n e w s t r a i n e t o u t d .oPas
. sionsofIulieta n. d h e r .Romeo. O[R]t i l l I h e a r e a S c e n e .more
. noblytakeThenw h. e n t h .yhalf [S|W O R D}p a r l y i n g R o m a n .sspa
. keTillthesetil l. a n y o .fthyv. o l u m e s r e s t S h a l l w i t .hmor
. efiremorefeeli n. g b e e .xprEs. t B e s u r e o u r S h a k e s p e .aret
. houcanstnEVERD Y. E B u t .crOwn. d w i t h L a w r e l l l i u e e t .erna
. lly.
.
[H.DANUERS] 45 : Prob. in poem ~ 1 in 192,000
(IONES) -47 : Prob. mear [H.DANUERS] ~ 1 in 950
{[AA]CROSS} -46 : Prob. {CROSS} in poem ~ 1 in 67
{HEWS} -47
.................................................
. . <= 14 =>
.
. a {S N} [A]s o s a i d,O f h i
. s,{T} h .y w i t-f r a u g h t
. B {O} o .k e s h a l l o n c e
. i {N} v .a d e[N]o r s h a l l
. I {E}'r .e b e l e e v e,o r t
. h. i .n .k e t h e e d e a d.
...........................................
{N/STONE} 14 : Prob. in poem ~ 1 in 280
---------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Stone

<<In 1619 *{N}ICHOLAS {STONE}* (d. 24 Aug. 1647) was appointed *MASTER-MASON*
to James I, and in 1626 to Charles I. {STONE} owed his early success in London
in part to Inigo {IONES}, the King's Surveyor, under whom he first worked at
(HOLYROOD) Palace, Edinburgh, in 1616, which led to the spectacular contract,
for building {IONES}'s Banqueting House, that placed him in the forefront
of London builders. *{N}ICHOLAS {STONE}* was born in 1586, the son
of a quarryman of Woodbury, near Exeter. He was first apprenticed to
Isaac James, a Dutch-born London mason working in Southwark, London.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo2/B12019.0001.001/1:2?rgn=div1;view=fulltext

THE HISTORY OF THE VALOROVS AND WITTIE KNIGHT-ERRANT,
DON-QVIXOTE Of the Mancha.

LONDON Printed by William Stansby, for Ed. Blount and W. Barret. 1612.
........................................................
CHAP. II. Of the first sally that Don-Quixote made to seeke aduentures.
........................................................
Scarce had the ruddy Apollo spread ouer the face of the vast and spacious earth, the golden twists of his beautifull hayres, and scarce had th{E} little enameld birds with their naked tongues salut{E}d with sweet and*[M]ellifluous harmony, the arriuall of {R}osie Aurora, when [A]bandoning her iealous husbands so{F}t couch, shee shewe[S] her selfe to mortall wights through the gates and wind[O]wes of the *Manchegall Orizon. When the famous Knight Do[N]-Quixote of the Mancha, abandoning the slouthfull plumes, did mount vpon his renouned horse Rozinante, and began to trauell through the auncient and notorious fields of Montiel, (as indeede he did) and following still on with his Discourses.
........................................................
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . <= 46 =>
.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scarcehadtheruddy
. Apollosp .r. eadouerthe .f. aceofthevastandspaciousea
. rththego .l. dentwistsof .h. isbeautifullhayresandsca
. rcehadth {E} littleenamel .d. birdswiththeirnakedtong
. uessalut {E} dwithsweetand [M] ellifluousharmonythear
. riuallof {R} osieAurorawhen [A] bandoningheriealoushu
. sbandsso {F} tcouchsheeshewe [S] herselfetomortallwig
. htsthrou .g. hthegatesandwind [O] wesoftheManchegallO
. rizonWhe .n. thefamousKnightDo [N] QuixoteoftheMancha
.
{FREE} -46
[MASON] 46
------------------------------------------------
https://gutenberg.org/files/15/15-0.txt

Moby-Dick or, THE WHALE. by Herman Melville
--------------------------------------------------------------
. . CHAPTER III. THE SPOUTER-INN

. This account cleared up the otherwise unaccountable mystery,
. and showed that the landlord, after all, had had no idea of
.[F]ooling me—but at the sa{M}e time what could I think of a
. ha[R]pooneer who stayed out {A} Saturday night clean into
. th[E] holy Sabbath, engaged in {S}uch a cannibal business
. as s[E]lling the heads of dead id{O}lators?

“Depend upon it, landlord, that harpooneer is a da{N}gerous man.”

“He pays reg’lar,” was the rejoinder. “But come, it’{S} getting
dreadful late, you had better be turning flukes—it’s a nice bed:
...............................................................
. . . . . . . . . <= 46 =>
.
. Thisacco. u .ntcleareduptheot. h .erwiseunaccountablem
. ysterya. n .dshowedthatthelan. d .lordafterallhadhadno
. ideaof [F] oolingmebutatthesa {M} etimewhatcouldIthink
. ofaha [R] pooneerwhostayedout {A} Saturdaynightcleanin
. toth [E] holySabbathengagedin {S} uchacannibalbusiness
. ass [E] llingtheheadsofdeadid {O} latorsDependuponitla
. nd. l .ordthatharpooneerisada {N} gerousmanHepaysregla
. r. w .astherejoinderButcomeit {S} gettingdreadfullatey
. . o .uhadbetterbeturningfluke. s .itsanicebed
.
[FREE] . 45
{MASONS} 46
--------------------------------------------------------------
. . . CHAPTER L. AHAB’S BOAT AND CREW. FEDALLAH
.
But one cannot sustain an indifferent air concerning Fedallah.
He was such a creature as civilized, domestic people in the
temperate zone only see in their dreams, and that but di{M}ly;
but the like of whom now and then glide among the unch{A}nging
Asiatic communities, especially the Oriental i{S}les to the
east of the continent—those insulated, immem{O}rial, unalterable
countries, which even in these moder{N} days still preserve
much of the ghostly aboriginalne{S}s of earth’s primal generations,
when the memory of the first man was a distinct recollection,
and all men his descendants, unknowing whence he came, eyed each
other as real phantoms, and asked of the sun and the moon why they
were created and to what end; when though, according to Genesis,
the angels indeed consorted with the daughters of men, the devils
also, add the uncanonical Rabbins, indulged in mundane amours.
................................
{MASONS} 46
-------------------------------------------------------------
. *STRANGE* Newes, 1592 by {T}homas {NASHE}
. Printed at London by *{I}ohn {DANTER}*, 1592.
...............................................
. . . . Sonnet 76 : 4 X 19 (Metonic cycle)
.
. WHy is my verse so barren of new pride?
. So far from variation or quicke *CHANGE*?
. Why with the time do I not glance aside
. {T}o new found methods, and to compounds *STRANGE*?
. {W}hy write I still all one, [EVER] the same,
. {A}nd keepe inuention in a *NOT{ED WEED}*,
. {T}hat {EVERy WORD} [D]oth almost fel {M[Y] NAME},
. {S}hewing th[E]ir birth, and whe[R]e {T}hey did proce[E]d?
. {O} k{N}ow sweet love I alw{A}ies writ[E] of you,
. A\n\{D} (Y)ou an[D] love are s(T|I|L)l my argument:
. So (A)ll my best is dressing old words new,
. Spending againe what is already spent:
. For as the Sun is daily new and old,
. So is my loue still telling what is told,
.............................................
............. <= 19 =>
.
.. E V E R {T} h e s a m e[A]n d k(E|E)p e
.. i n u(E){N}(T)i o n i n a*N O T(E)D W(E)
.. E D*T h {A}(T)E V E R y w o r(D|D]o t h
.. a l m o {S}(T)F E L m[Y]n a m<E>S h e w
.. i n g t {H}[E]i r b i r t h a n d w h e
. [R]e t h {E} y(D)i d p r o c e[E]d
.
{T.NASHE} 19 Prob. in Sonnet 76 ~ 1 in 450
[only *TNASHE* in Sonnets of any skip!]
...........................................
[T.WATSO\n\] Acrostic Prob. ~ 1 in 5500
...........................................
Meres: "As {I|TALY) had {DANTE}, Boccace, Petrarch, ...
so England had {T}homas {WATSO\n\}, Thomas Kid, ..."
................................................
____....... <= 15 =>
.
. (N. O. T){E. D. W. E. E. D}(T) h. A. T {E. V
.. E. R. y. w. o. r. D}[D](O) t. h. a. l. m. o
.. S. T. F. E. L {M [Y](N) A. M. E} S. h. e. w
.. i. n. g. t. H [E] I. r. b. i. r. t. h. a. n
. (D) w. h. e [R] e {T} h. E. y. D. i. d. p. r
. (O) c. e [E. D] O. K {N} o. w. s. w. e. E. t
. (L) o [V. E] I. a. l. w {A} i. e. s. w. r. i
. (T)[E] o. f. y. o. u. A. n {D}(Y) o. u. a. n
. [D] l. O. v. E. a. r. e. s (T){I}(L) l. m. y
.. a. r. g. u. m. e. n. t: S. o (A) l. l. m. y
................................................
{I.DANTE/R} skip -16 {found by James Ferris}
-------------------------------------------------
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjpedl7IgHQ
--------------------------------------------------
. A Poem by Grand Master [H]enry [DANUERS]?
.................................................
. An Active Swain to make a Leap was seen
. Which sham’d his Fellow Shepherds on the Green,
. And growing Vain, he would Essay once more,
. But lost the Fame, which he had gain’d before;
. Oft’ did he try, at Length was forc’d to yeild
. He Stove in Vain, — he had himself Excell’d:
.
. So Nature once in her Essays of Wit,
. In *SHAKESPEAR* took the Shepherd’s Lucky Leap
. But o[VER-S]training in the gre[A]t Effort,
. In [D]ryden, and t[H]e rest, has since fell Short.
...............................................
. . . . <= 10 =>
.
. B u t o [V E R-S] t r
. a i n i [N] g i n t h
. e g r e [A] t E f f o
. r t,I n [D] r y d e n,
. a n d t [H] e r e s t,
.
[H.DANV/ERS] -10 : Prob. ~ 1 in 3,250
----------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Oxford_Botanic_Garden

<<In the {E}velyn {WAUGH} novel Brideshead Revisited, Lord Sebastian
Flyte takes Charles Ryder "to see the ivy" soon after they first meet:
.......................................................................
The others left soon after him. I rose to go with them, but Sebastian
said: “Have some more Cointreau,” so I stayed and later he said,

“I must go to the Botanical Gardens.”

“Why?”

“To see the ivy.”

It seemed a good enough reason and I went with him.
He took my arm as we walked under the walls of Merton.

“I’ve never been to the Botanical Gardens,” I said.

“Oh, Charles, what a lot you have to learn! There’s a beautiful
arch there and more different kinds of ivy than I knew existed.
I don’t know where I should be without the Botanical Gardens.”>>
........................................................................
He daren’t s{H}ow his {G}reat p{U}rple f{A}ce any{W}here. H{E} is the
last, historic, authentic case of someone being hounded out of society.
Brideshead won’t see him, the girls mayn’t, Sebastian does, of course,
because he’s so charming. No one else goes near him.
.......................
. . . . <= 6 =>
.
. . H e d. a .r e
. . n’t s {H} o w
. . h i s {G} r e
. . a t p {U} r p
. . l e f {A} c e
. . a n y {W} h e
. . r e.H {E} i s
. . t h e. l .a s t
.
{E.WAUGH} -6
.................................................................
.................................................................
perhap[S] the Beatific Visio[N] itself has some rem[O]te kinship
with thi[S] lowly experience; I, [A]t any rate, believed [M]yself
very near heaven, during those languid days at Brideshead.
...............................
. . . <= 17 =>
.
. perhap [S] theBeatifi
. cVisio [N] itselfhass
. omerem [O] tekinshipw
. iththi [S] lowlyexper
. ienceI [A] tanyratebe
. lieved [M] yselfveryn
. earhea. v .en
.
[MASONS] -17
.......................................................................
.......................................................................
My three platoon commanders a{N}d myself had a carriage to {O}urselves.
They ate sandwi{C}hes and chocolate, smoked {A}nd slept. None of them
had a {B}ook. For the first three or {F}our hours they noted the names
of the towns and leaned out of the windows when, as often happened,
we stopped between stations.
...............................
...............................
. . <= 22 =>
.
. Myt. h .r eeplatooncommande
. rsa {N} d myselfhadacarriag
. eto {O} u rselvesTheyatesan
. dwi {C} h esandchocolatesmo
. ked {A} n dsleptNoneofthemh
. ada {B} o okForthefirstthre
. eor {F} o urhourstheynotedt
. hen. a .m esofthetownsandle
. ane. d .o utofthewindows
.
{F.BACON} -22
--------------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brideshead_Revisited#Et_In_Arcadia_Ego

. . . . . Et In Arcadia Ego

<<In 1923, protagonist and narrator Charles Ryder, an undergraduate studying history at a college very similar to Hertford College, Oxford, is befriended by Lord Sebastian Flyte, the younger son of the aristocratic Lord Marchmain and an undergraduate at Christ Church. Sebastian introduces Charles to his eccentric friends, including the haughty aesthete and homosexual Anthony Blanche. Sebastian also takes Charles to his family's palatial mansion, Brideshead Castle, in Wiltshire, where Charles later meets the rest of Sebastian's family, including his sister Julia. During the long summer holiday, Charles returns home to London, where he lives with his widowed father, Edward Ryder. The conversations there between Charles and Edward provide some of the best-known comic scenes in the novel. Charles is called back to Brideshead after Sebastian incurs a minor injury, and Sebastian and Charles spend the remainder of the holiday together. Sebastian's family are Roman Catholic, which influences the Flytes' lives as well as the content of their conversations, all of which surprises Charles, who had always assumed Christianity was "without substance or merit". Lord Marchmain had converted from Anglicanism to Roman Catholicism to marry his wife, but he later abandoned both his marriage and his new religion, and moved to Venice, Italy. Left alone, Lady Marchmain focuses even more on her faith, which is also enthusiastically espoused by her elder son, Lord Brideshead ("Bridey"), and by her younger daughter, Cordelia.>>
----------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Stone

<<In 1619 *{N}ICHOLAS {STONE}* (d. 24 Aug. 1647) was appointed *MASTER-MASON*
to James I, and in 1626 to Charles I. Stone owed his early success in London
in part to Inigo {IONES}, the King's Surveyor, under whom he first worked at
(HOLYROOD) Palace, Edinburgh, in 1616, which led to the spectacular contract,
for building {IONES}'s Banqueting House, that placed him in the forefront
of London builders. Nicholas Stone was born in 1586, the son of a quarryman
of Woodbury, near Exeter. He was first apprenticed to Isaac James,
a Dutch-born London mason working in Southwark, London.>>
............................................................
From: A Visit to Edinburgh and Lodge Canongate Kilwinning #2.
http://scrl.rosesandivy.net/monthly/edinburg.html
............................................................
The "Royal Mile" leads from this castle to (HOLYROOD) Castle,
home of MARY, QUEEN of SCOTS, from 1561-1567.
[Freemason Grandmaster Sackville (1561-1567)]

<<The initiative in forming the Grand Lodge of Scotland was taken by
this Lodge. One of its members, William St. Clair of Rosslyn became
first Grand Master. The Lodge motto, "POST NUBILE PHOEBUS" (After
the clouds the sun), refers to DAWN and ancient sun worship.

The Annual Festival is held on St. John the Baptist's Day, June 24th.

The present Lodge building was consecrated in December, 1736, and
is the oldest building in the world built for Masonic purposes.
On entering the Lodge room, one is instantly drawn drawn to
what appear to be four alcoves contining statues, two on
the north wall and two on the south. When approached,
they are found to be cleverly executed mural paintings:

of LORD BYRON & SIR WALTER SCOTT on the north wall
and ROBERT BURNS & WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE on the south.
---------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rood

<<(ROOD) is an archaic word for pole, from Old English rōd "pole", specifically "cross."
Rood was originally the only Old English word for the instrument of Jesus Christ's death. More precisely, the Rood or Holyrood was the True Cross, the specific wooden cross used in Christ's crucifixion. The word remains in use in some names, such as (HOLY|ROOD) Palace and the Old English poem The Dream of the (ROOD).

The phrase "by the (ROOD)" was used in swearing.>>
................................................
. . Hamlet (Quarto 2 : 1604) Act 3, Scene 4.
.
Enter King and Polonius.
.
King: Loue, his affections doe not that way tend,
. Nor what he spake, though it lackt forme a little,
. Was not like madnes, there's something in his soule
. Ore which his melanc(HOLY) sits on b(ROOD),
. And I doe doubt, the hatch and the disclose
. Will be some danger; which for to preuent,
. I haue in quick determination
. Thus set it downe: he shall with speede to England,
. For the demaund of our neglected tribute,
. Haply the seas, and countries different,
. With variable obiects, shall expell
. This something setled matter in his hart,
. Whereon his braines still beating
. Puts him thus from fashion of himselfe.
................................................
. . . Hamlet (Quarto 2 : 1604) Act 3, Scene 1.

Ham. What's the matter now?

Ger. Haue you forgot me?

Ham. No by the (ROOD) not so,
. You are the Queene, your husbands brothers wife,
. And would it were not so, you are my mother.
------------------------------------------------------------
In his Frontline essay, William Murphy
mentions *THOMAS LODGE* once & only once:
......................................................
Thirty-Six Plays in Search of an Author
by William M. Murphy, Union College Symposium 1964
..................................................................
<<All the known evid[E]nce points to the Stratfo[R|D} Shakespeare
. as t(HE W)rit[E|R} of Hamlet, Macbeth, Henry [V], {A}nd the
. other plays an(D) p{O|E|M}s that have kept t(HE W)(O)r{L|D|A}t
. the author's knees *f(O)r almost four hundred yea(R)s* .>>
....................................................
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . <= 22 =>
.
. A l l t h e k .n. o. w n e .v. i .d [E] n. c e p o i
. n t s t o t h .e. S. t r a .t. f .o [R]{D} S h a k e
. s p e a r e a (S) t (H E W) r. i .t [E]{R} o f(H)a m
. l e t,M a c b .e. t. h,H e .n. r .y [V]{A} n d t h e
. o t h e r p l .a. y. s a n (D) p {O}[E]{M} s t h a t
. h a v e k e p .t. t (H E W)(O) r {L}[D]{A} t t h e a
. u t h o r's k .n. e. e s f (O) r *A. L .M. O S T F O
. U R H U N D R .E. D. Y E A (R) S*
.............................
{L.O.} . -22
[DEVERE] -22
{DRAMA} . 22
(ROOD). .-22
(HEWS). . -4
..................................................................
<<It should be apparent to anyone possessing normal common sense,
then, that {Shakespeare's authorship} of the works is not merely
"pro[B]able" or "likely," as some softhe[A]ds have put it, but
absolutely [C]ompelling. Yet it is common kn[O]wledge that after
Delia [BACON] published her vague notions about authorship in
1856 defenders of her unorthodox views and creators of others
multiplied like rabbits, and any reader of the modern
newspaper knows that the tribe increases every year.>>
....................................................
________ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . <= 25 =>
.
. {S h a k e s p e a r e's a u t h o r s h i .p} o f t
. .h e w o r k s i s n o t m e r e l y"p r o [B] a b l
. .e"o r"l i k e l y"a s s o m e s o f t h e [A] d s h
. .a v e p u t i t,b u t a b s o l u t e l y [C] o m p
. .e l l i n g.Y e t i t i s c o m m o n k n [O] w l e
. .d g e t h a t a f t e r D e l i a [B A C O N] p u b
. .l i s h e d h e r v a g u e n o t i o n s
.
[BACON] 25 : Prob. stuck on [BACON] ~ 1 in 325
.............................................................
There are those, like Delia Bacon, who are afflicted with what
has been called the "Corporation Syndrome," holding that such
distinguished literature mu(S)t be the work of a com{M}i[T]tee.
Its members w{O}u[L]d include, in addi{T}i[O]n to BACON and Oxfor[D],
Robert GREENE, Geor[G]e PEELE, Samuel DANI[E]L, Thomas NASHE,
*THOMAS LODGE*, Michael Drayton, and Thomas Dekker.
....................................................
_____ . . <= 17 =>
.
. .m u (S) t .b. e t h e w o r k o f a c
. .o m {M} i [T] t e e.I t s m e m b e r
. .s w {O} u [L] d i n c l u d e,i n a d
. .d i {T} i [O] n t o B a c o n a n d O
. .x f .o. r [D] R o b e r t G r e e n e,
. .G e .o. r [G] e P e e l e,S a m u e l
. .D a .n. i [E] l,T h o m a s N a s h e,
. *T H .O. M .A. S L O D G E*

[T.LODGE] 17 : Prob. stuck on *THOMAS LODGE* ~ 1 in 100,000
{TOM(S)} -17
-------------------------------------------------------------
from: _Big Secrets_ William Poundstone
https://sites.google.com/site/zprime21/

Masonic Secret Word: Not to be confused with the password. The Word (always capitalized) is so secret that initiates are taught it one letter at a time. First they learn A, then O, then M, and finally I. The Word is *IAOM*. You never get a straight story as to what it means. As best as anyone can figure, it is the ineffable name of god, or some approximation thereof. The Word (or Name) is a internal linktongue-internal linktwister. It takes some practice to get it right.
...................................................
_Masonry and Its Symbols in the Light of Thinking and Destiny_
by Harold Waldwin Percival (15 April 1868 - 6 March 1953):

https://tandd.org/hlib/masonry-and-its-symbols/section06.html

<<The Word, an English translation of the Logos, as used by St. John, is not the Name. It is an expression of the full Triune Self powers, each of the three parts being represented in it by a sound, and the perfect body in which the Triune Self dwells being also represented by a sound. The Doer part is expressed as A, the Thinker part as U or O, the Knower part as M, and the perfect body as I. The Word is I-A-O-M, in four syllables or letters. The expression of the perfect body and the Triune Self as these sounds is an expression of the Conscious Light of the Intelligence through that Self and body. When a part in its physical body sounds as *IAOM* each of the parts sounds AOM, and each represents a Logos. The Knower is then the First Logos, the Thinker the Second Logos and the Doer the Third Logos.

The Word is symbolized by a circle in which are a hexad of two interlaced triangles, and the point in the center. The point is the M, the triangle Aries, Leo, Sagittary is the A, the triangle Gemini, Libra, Aquarius is the U or the O, and the circle is the fully expressed point M as well as the line of the body I. The hexad is made up of the macrocosmic signs standing for the sexless triad and the androgynous triad, the triangle of God as Intelligence and the triangle of God as nature. These letters in which the perfect Self sounds, are symbolized in Masonry by the square and compass or the emblem of the interlaced triangles.

There is a succinct relationship of the Word with the Ineffable Name. The Word is feeling-and-desire, the Doer. The Doer is lost in the body of flesh and blood in the world of life and death. Thus the Doer is the lost Word. The body, when perfected, serves as the instrument through which the Doer pronounces the Ineffable Name. The Ineffable Name and the embodied Word, when one is fitted to speak it, is IAOM. By so doing the body is raised from a horizontal to an upright position.

The Name is pronounced as follows: It is started by opening the lips with an “ee” sound graduating into a broad “a” as the mouth opens wider with the lips forming an oval shape and then graduating the sound to “o” as the lips form a circle, and again modulating to an “m” sound as the lips close to a point. This point resolves itself to a point within the head.

Expressed phonetically the Name is “EE-Ah-Oh-Mmm” and is pronounced with one continuous outbreathing with a slight nasal tone in the manner described above. It can be correctly and properly expressed with its full power only by one who has brought his physical body to a state of perfection, that is, balanced and sexless.>>
----------------------------------------------------------------
. . I stumbled across a long youtube:

Alan Green - presenting "Dee-Coding Shakespeare"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=upzjM7-83LE

and it got me thinking about the mispagination of page: 273/265
http://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/283/?zoom=850

So I did an ELS search for the top of page: 264
http://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/282/?zoom=850

...and discovered: {M}[MASONS]{r} skip 33 = 264/(273-265) :
--------------------------------------------------------------
. Twelfth Night (First Folio, 1623) top of page 264: II, v
.
{M}al. Ioue knowes I loue, but who, Lips do not [M]ooue, no
. man must know. No man must know. Wh[A]t followes?
. The numbers alter'd: No man mu[S]t know,
. If this should be thee Maluolio?
.
T[O]. Marrie hang thee brock(E).
.
Mal. I may comma[N]d where I adore, but silenc(E) like a Lu-
. cre[S]se knife:
. With bloodlesse st(R)oke my hea{r}t doth gor(E), {M}.O.A.I. d{O}th
. sw{A}y my l{I|F|E).
.
Fa. *A FUSTIAN RIDDLE*!
........................................................
............ <= 33 = 264/(273-265) =>
.
. {M} alIou. e kn o. w e s I l. o. uebu. t w h o L i p. sdonot
. [M] oouen. o ma n. m u s t k. n. owNo. m a n m u s t. knowWh
. [A] tfoll. o we s. T h e n u. m. bers. a l t e r d N. omanmu
. [S] tknow. I ft h. i s s h o. u. ldbe. t h e e M a l. uolioT
. [O] Marri. e ha n. g t h e e. b. rock (E)M a l I m a. ycomma
. [N] dwher. e Ia d. o r e b u. t. sile. n c(E)l i k e. aLucre
. [S] sekni (F)eW i. t h b l o. o. dles. s e s t(R)o k. emyhea
. {r} tdoth. g or(E){M O A I}d {O} thsw {A}y m y l{I|F)(E)
.
{M}[MASONS]{r} 33 : [MASONS] Prob. here ~ 1 in 1470
(FREE) -35,18 : Prob. of both here ~ 1 in 135
{MOAI} 5,1
--------------------------------------------------------
http://www.bartleby.com/153/107.html
http://www.luminarium.org/renascence-editions/colin.html
...................................................
Colin Clo{UT}s Co(M|E)
......... Home Ag(A|I|N)e
......... BY ED. (S|P|E)NCER
............... L(O N|D)ON
............. PRI(N)T E D FOR WILLIAM PONSONBIE
................................................
(MASON) 8 : Prob. ~ 1 in 5,750
(PIE) -8
(NED) 8
................................................
Colin Clouts Co[M]E H[O]me [A]ga[I]ne
................................................
[MOAI] 3 : Prob. ~ 1 in 135
-------------------------------------------------
...... Sonnet 90

THen hate me when thou wilt, if euer, now,
Now while the world is bent my deeds to [CROSSE],
Ioyne with the spight of fortune, make me bow,
And doe not drop in for an after losse:
Ah doe not, when my heart hath scapte this sorrow,
Come in the rereward of a conquerd woe,
Giue not a windy night a rainie morrow,
To linger out a purposd ouer-throw.
If thou wilt leaue me, do not leaue me last,
When other pettie griefes haue done their spight,
But in the onset co[M]e, s[O] st[A]ll [I] taste
At first t{H}e v{E}ry {W}or{S}t of fortunes might.
And other straines of woe, which now seeme woe,
Compar'd with losse of thee, will not seeme so.

[CROSSE] 1
{HEWS} 3
[MOAI] 3
----------------------------------------------------
...... Sonnet 152

IN louing thee thou know'st I a[M] forsworne,
But thou art twice f[O]rsworne to me loue swearing,
In [A]ct thy bed-vow broake and new fa[I]th torne,
In vowing new hate after new loue bearing:
But why of two othes breach doe I accuse thee,
W{H}en I breake twenty:I am p{E}riur'd most,
For all my vo{W}es are othes but to misu{S}e thee:
And all my honest faith in thee is lost.
For I haue sworne deepe othes of thy deep[E] kindne[S]se:
Othe[S] of thy l[O]ue, thy t[R]uth, thy [C]onstancie,
And to inlighten thee gaue eyes to blindnesse,
Or made them swere against the thing they see.
For I haue sworne thee faire:more periurde eye,
To swere against the truth fo foule a lie.

[MOAI] 26
{HEWS} 20
[CROSSE] -7 : Prob. in Sonnets ~ 1 in 30
--------------------------------------------------
. . . [ALL FOR ONE] : [TOUT PAR UNG]
.....................................................
. [H] [W] : [H]enry [W]riothesley
. <E> <S> : <E>arl of <S>outhampton
-------------------------------------------------------
"A [MAN] in hew *ALL* <HEWS> in his con(TROW}l(I}ng"
..........................................................
. READ IF THOV CANST, WHOM ENVIOVS DEATH HATH *PLAST*
. WITH IN THIS MONVMENT SHAKSPEARE: WITH WHOME,
. QUICK [NATURE DIDE] [WHoSE] [NAM] {EDO} <TH. DECK.> YS TOMBE,
.*FAR* MORE,THEN COST: [SIEH] *ALL*, YT HE HATH WRITT,
..............................................................
[He is] [MAN] [E.So. H.W.] [EDIDERUT(a)N] / {EDO} <TH. DECK.>
.............................................................
{EDO}: I give out, put or bring forth; eject, discharge.
. I produce, bear, give birth to, yield, form, *BEGET* .
. I put forth, *PUBLISH* , spread abroad.
. I *SET FORTH*, relate, tell, disclose, deliver, announce, declare.
. I produce, perform, show, inflict, bring about, cause.
.
[EDIDERUNT(a)]: 3rd-person plural perfect active
. indicative of {EDO} [They have *SET FORTH*]
-----------------------------------------------------------------
To [.W.H.oS.E] sound chaste wings obay.
...................................................
3: [.W.H.oS.E] fresh repaire if now thou not renewest,
8: [.W.H.oS.E] speechlesse song being many, seeming one,
....................................................
. *EDO-uardus VERUS*
....................................................
. {EDO} , edere, EDIDI, EDITum, [EDIDERUNT] (Latin)
. give out, *SET FORTH*; bring forth, beget, produce;
. relate, tell, utter; *PUBLISH*.
-----------------------------------------------------------
Dave Roper: "{SO TEST} Him, *I UOW* He Is Edward De Uere"
.............................................................
_______________ . . <= 34 =>

. H E N . R . Y. W R . . I . O T HE. SLEYEARLE ______... OF. SO U .T. HAMPTO. N
................................................................................
. T E R . R . A. T E .. [G] .I T,PO. PULUSMÆRE ______... TO. LY M .P. USHABE. T
................................................................................
. S T A . Y . P. A S .. [S] .E N GE. RWHYGOEST _ _ _ _ . TH. OV B {Y) SOFAST. R
. E A D . I . F. T . (H)[O] .V C AN. STWHOM _ [E] .[N] .VIO. VS D {E) ATHHAT. H
.*P L A. <S> .T* W . (I){T} <H{I}NT> HISMON _ [U] (M)[E] NT *SH A (K) SPEARE* W
. I T. <H W H> . O . (M){E} .Q{U}IC. KNATVR _ [E D] (I)[D]E *WH O .S. ENAMED* O
. T H D. <E> .C. K Y... {S} .T{O}MB. EFARMO _ [R E] t (H) E. NC O .S. TSIEHA. L
. L Y T. <H> .E. H A-.. {T} .H{W}RI. TTLEAV _ [E]S. L. I. V. IN G .A. RTBVTP. A
. G E T . O. .S. E R.... V. .E H IS. WITT
.......................................................
[EUERE][DE] 34
{SO TEST} . 34
{I UOW} . . 34
<HEWS> . . -34
(KEY). . . -34
----------------------------------------------
https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=key

<<*KEY* (n) "instrument for opening locks," Middle English *KEIE*, perhaps it is related to Middle Low German *KEIE* "lance, *SPEAR*" on notion of "tool to cleave. literal and figurative ("solution, explanation, one who or that which opens the way or explains").>>
----------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coats_of_arms_of_the_Holy_See_and_Vatican_City
...........................................
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/31/Coat_of_arms_Holy_See.svg/300px-Coat_of_arms_Holy_See.svg.png

Coat of arms of the Holy See with gold key in bend
...........................................
<<The coats of arms of the Holy See and Vatican City in the form that combines two crossed keys and a tiara used as a coat of arms of the Holy See have origins attested from the 14th century. For decades after the creation of the Vatican State, the arrangement of the keys in the Holy See's coat of arms as described in these sources distinguishes it from that of Vatican City State by a reversing of the gold and silver keys.

However, such form of the coat of arms has not been used by the Holy See for decades: in all official events and in the diplomatic missions of the Holy See abroad, it is always the regular Vatican City flag (with the gold key pointing upwards to the right and the silver key pointing upwards to the left) that is flown,[8][9][10][11][12][13] and the Vatican now only uses the Holy See's coat of arms in monochrome,[7] which renders it in practice one and the same as the coat of arms of Vatican City.
...........................................
Matthew 16:19 And I will giue vnto thee the *KEYES* of the kingdome of heauen:
-----------------------------------------------------------------
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/04/Coat_of_arms_of_Sir_Henry_Wriothesley%2C_3rd_Earl_of_Southampton%2C_KG.png

Quartered arms of Sir Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of [SOUTH-ampton]

KG: Quarterly of four: Azure, a cross or between four *HAWKS* close argent (Wriothesley);
2nd: Argent, a fret gules on a canton of the second a lion passant or (unknown);
3rd: Argent, five fusils conjoined in pale gules a bordure azure bezantée (unknown);
4th: Per pale indented gules and azure, a lion rampant or
-----------------------------------------------------------
HAMLET: I am but mad north-north-west: when the wind
. . is [SOUTH]erly I know a *HAWK* from a HANDSAW.
.......................................................
. . . [SOUTH-ampton] Wriothesley coat of arms:

Azure, a cross or between four *HAWKS* close argent

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f9/WriothesleyArms.png/800px-WriothesleyArms.png
...................................................
. . . Shakespeare coat of arms:

a *FALCON* his wings displayed argent [silver], supporting a spear gold

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/54/Shakespeare_coat-of-arms.jpg

The motto that runs along the bottom reads:

. . {NON SANS DROICT}
. . {CONNARDS OINTS} : (French) "Anointed Assholes"
--------------------------------------------------
5[S WE H]'s:
...................................................
TO THE MOST NOBLE AND INCOMPARABLE PAIRE OF BRETHREN.

. . WILLIAM Earle of Pembroke...
.
<<Masonic Secret Word: Not to be confused with the password. The Word (always capitalized) is so secret that initiates are taught it one letter at a time. First they learn A, then O, then M, and finally I. The Word is {IAOM}. You never get a straight story as to what it means. As best as anyone can figure, it is the ineffable name of god, or some approximation thereof.>>
...................................................
_Masonry and Its Symbols in the Light of Thinking and Destiny_
by Harold Waldwin Percival (15 April 1868 - 6 March 1953):

https://tandd.org/hlib/masonry-and-its-symbols/section06.html

<<The Word, an English translation of the Logos, as used by St. John, is not the Name. It is an expression of the full Triune Self powers, each of the three parts being represented in it by a sound, and the perfect body in which the Triune Self dwells being also represented by a sound. The Doer part is expressed as {A}, the Thinker part as U or {O}, the Knower part as {M}, and the perfect body as {I}. The Word is {I-A-O-M}, in four syllables or letters. The expression of the perfect body and the Triune Self as these sounds is an expression of the Conscious Light of the Intelligence through that Self and body. When a part in its physical body sounds as {IAOM} each of the parts sounds AOM, and each represents a Logos. The Knower is then the First Logos, the Thinker the Second Logos and the Doer the Third Logos. The Word is symbolized by a circle in which are a hexad of two interlaced triangles, and the point in the center. These letters in which the perfect Self sounds, are symbolized in Masonry by the square and compass or the emblem of the interlaced triangles.

There is a succinct relationship of the Word with the Ineffable Name. The Word is feeling-and-desire, the Doer. The Doer is lost in the body of flesh and blood in the world of life and death. Thus the Doer is the lost Word. The body, when perfected, serves as the instrument through which the Doer pronounces the Ineffable Name. The Ineffable Name and the embodied Word, when one is fitted to speak it, is {IAOM}. By so doing the body is raised from a horizontal to an upright position. Expressed phonetically the Name is “EE-Ah-Oh-Mmm” and is pronounced with one continuous outbreathing with a slight nasal tone in the manner described above. It can be correctly and properly expressed with its full power only by one who has brought his physical body to a state of perfection, that is, balanced and sexless.>>
..................................................
. . . . 1714 Poem by John Gay
. . . . . . . KJV Psalm 40

1 I waited patiently for the Lord, and
. he inclined vnto me, and heard my crie.
2 He brought {M}e vp also out of an horrible pit,
. out of the (M)irie clay, {A}nd set my feete vpon
. (A) rock, and established my going{S}.
3 And he hath put a new song in my m(O)uth, euen praise
. vnt{O} our God: ma(N)y shall see it, and feare,
. and shall trust i{N} the Lord.
4 Blessed is that man that maketh the Lord hi{S} truste: and
. respecteth not the proud, nor such as turne aside to lies.
................................................
. . . . . . . . <= 23 =>
.
. I w a i t e d p a t i e n t l y f o r t h e L
. o r d,a n d h e i n c l i n e d v n t o m e,a
. n d h e a r d m y c r i e H e b r o u g h t{M}
. e v p a l s o o u t o f a n h o r r i b l e p
. i t,o u t o f t h e(M)i r i e c l a y{A}n d s
. e t m y f e e t e v p o n(A)r o c k,a n d e s
. t a b l i s h e d m y g o i n g{S}A n d h e h
. a t h p u t a n e w s o n g i n m y m(O)u t h,
. e u e n p r a i s e v n t{O}o u r G o d:m a(N)
. y s h a l l s e e i t,a n d f e a r e,a n d s
. h a l l t r u s t i{N}t h e L o r d.B l e s s
. e d i s t h a t m a n t h a t m a k e t h t h
. e L o r d h i{S}t r u s t e:
.
{MASONS} 43
(MASON). 26
Prob. of 2(MASON)s in 1st 3 verses of any Psalm ~ 1 in 325
----------------------------------------------------------
The Shepherd's Week : Saturday; Or, The Flights -
. 1714 Poem by John Gay

And plays a tickling Straw withi[N] his Nose.
He rubs his Nostril, and in w[O]nted *Joke*
The sneering Swains with [S]tamm'ring Speech bespoke.
To you, my L[A]ds, I'll sing my Carrol's o'er,
As for th{E} [M]aids, — I've something {E}lse in store.

No soone{R} 'gan he raise his tune{F}ul Song,
But Lads and Lasses round about hi[M] t(H)rong.
Not Ballad singer plac'd above th(E) Croud
Sings with [A] Note so shrilling s(W)eet and loud,
Nor Parish Clerk who call[S] the Psalm so clear,
Like Bowzybeus sooths th' attentive Ear.

[O]f Nature's Laws his Carrols first begun,
Why the grave Owl ca[N] never face the Sun.
.........................................................
............ <= 25 =>
.
.. A n d p l a y s a t i c k l i n g S t r a w w i t
.. h i[N]h i s N o s e H e r u b s h i s N o s t r i
.. l a n d i n w[O]n t e d J o k e T h e s n e e r i
.. n g S w a i n s w i t h[S]t a m m r i n g S p e e
.. c h b e s p o k e T o y o u m y L[A]d s I l l s i
.. n g m y C a r r o l s o e r A s f o r t h{E|M]a i
.. d s I v e s o m e t h i n g{E}l s e i n s t o r e
.. N o s o o n e{R}g a n h e r a i s e h i s t u n e
. {F}u l S o n g B u t L a d s a n d L a s s e s r o
.. u n d a b o u t h i[M]t(H)r o n g N o t B a l l a
.. d s i n g e r p l a c d a b o v e t h(E)C r o u d
.. S i n g s w i t h[A]N o t e s o s h r i l l i n g
.. s(W)e e t a n d l o u d N o r P a r i s h C l e r
.. k w h o c a l l[S]t h e P s a l m s o c l e a r L
.. i k e B o w z y b e u s s o o t h s t h a t t e n
.. t i v e E a r[O]f N a t u r e s L a w s h i s C a
.. r r o l s f i r s t b e g u n W h y t h e g r a v
.. e O w l c a[N]n e v e r f a c e t h e S u n
.
[MASON] -30, 49 : Prob. of both so near ~ 1 in 100
{FREE}. -18 : Prob. here ~ 1 in 10
(HEWS).. 32 : Prob. here ~ 1 in 5
-----------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
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