CEPHALUS & PROCRIS

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Arthur Neuendorffer

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Jul 31, 2018, 11:20:07 PM7/31/18
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------------------------------------------------------------
Diane Price: "The first remark raising a question about the
authorship of a Shakespeare work was made by contemporary
Thomaas Edwards. In 3 stanzas of a longer 1595 poem, Edwards
implied that the author of Venus & Adonis was an aristocrat."
...........................................................
<<L'Envoy to [NARCISSUS], by Thomas Edwards,
from a poem in Cephalus & Procris (1595)>>

CEPHALUS & PROCRIS. NARCISSUS. Aurora musae amica.
LONDON Imprinted by Iohn Wolfe. 1595.
.
. Narcissus, L’Envoy
.
. Scarring beautie all bewitching,
. Tell a tale to hurt it selfe,
. Tels a tale how men are fleeting,
. All of Love and his power,
. Tels how womens shewes are pelfe,
. And their constancies as flowers.
.
. Aie me pretie wanton boy,
. What a sire did hatch thee forth,
. To shew thee of the worlds annoy,
. Ere thou kenn'st anie pleasure:
. Such a favour's nothing worth,
. To touch not to taste the treasure.
.
. *POETS* that divinely dreampt,
. Telling wonders visedly,
. My slow Muse have quite benempt,
. And my rude skonce have aslackt,
. So I cannot cunningly,
. Make an image to awake.
.
. Ne the frostie lims of age,
. Uncouth shape (mickle wonder)
. To tread with them in equipage,
. As quaint light blearing eies,
. Come my pen broken under,
. Magick-spels such devize.
.
. Collyn was a mighty swaine,
. In his power all do flourish,
. We are shepheards but in vaine,
. There is but one tooke the charge,
. By his toile we do nourish,
. And by him are inlarg’d.
.
. He unlockt Albions glori[E],
. He was tol[D]e of SIDNE[Y]s honor,
. On[E]ly he of ou[R] stories,
. Must be sung in greatest pride,
. In an Eglogue he hath wonne her,
. Fame and honor on his side.
.................................
. <= 9 =>
.
. H e u n l o c k t
. A l b i o n s g l
. o r i [E] H e w a s
. t o l [D] e o f S I
. D N E [Y] s h o n o
. r,O n [E] l y h e o
. f o u [R] s t o r i
. e s,
.
[E.DYER]
.................................
. Deale we not with Rosamond,
. For the world our sawe will coate,
. Amintas and Leander’s gone,
. Oh deare sonnes of stately kings,
. Blessed be your nimble throats,
. That so amourously could sìng.
.
. *ADON [D|E]AFly MASKing* thro,
. Stately troupes rich conceited,
. Shew'd he well *DE(s)ERVED* to,
. Lo[V]es delight on him to gaze,
. And had not love her selfe intreated,
. Other NYMPHS had s[E]nt him *BAIES* .
.
. Eke in purple roabes distaind,
. Amid'st the Center of this clime,
. I hau[E] heard saie doth remaine,
. One whose power FLOWeth far,
. That shou{L}d h{A}ve {B}en{E} of {O}u[R] rime,
. The onely obiect and *the STAR* .
.......................................................
. <= 66 =>
.
[D|E] AFlyMASKingthroStatelytroupesrichconceitedShewdhewe l lD E sE R VE D to L
o[V] esdelightonhimtogazeAndhadnotloveherselfeintreatedO t he r NY M PH S ha d
s[E] nthimBAIESEkeinpurpleroabesdistaindAmidsttheCentero f th i sc l im e Ih a
v[E] heardsaiedothremaineOnewhosepowerFLOWethfarThatshou{L}dh{A}ve{B}en{E}of{O}
u[R] rimeTheonelyobiectandtheSTAR
.
[D|E.VEER] 66
{LABEO} 3 : Prob. in one line ~ 1 in 660
.......................................................
. Well could his bewitching pen,
. Done the MUSES obiects to vs,
. Although he differs much from men,
. Tilting under Frieries,
. Yet his golden art might woo us,
. To haue honored him with *BAIES* .
---------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.sourcetext.com/sourcebook/library/bowen/26worcester.htm

Worcester's, Oxford's and The Admiral's
First published in Shakespearean Authorship Review,
Summer 1974 by Gwynneth Bowen.

<<On 14th January, 1583, when William Somerset, 3rd Earl of Worcester issued a licence to his players. There were eight of them, but we need to remember only four—Robert Browne, Richard Jones, James Tunstall and Edward Alleyn, then aged sixteen. The last recorded performance of this company was in March 1585, and on 28th October of the same year, John and Edward Alleyn bought from their mother and step-father "four messuages in Busshopsgate Streete without Busshopsgate in the suburb of London lying next the house of the Earl of Oxford." The sale was witnessed by James Tunstall and it is interesting to find him at this early date, in his usual role as witness. Many years later, in 1615, Edward Alleyn drew up a lease for "two-messuages . . . lying next the mansion-house of Fisher's Folly, in Bishopsgate Street, with an alley and garden and eight small tenements adjoining," and this lease is endorsed: "<PYE> Alley in Bishopsgate Street, now Mr. Phillips."

Fisher's Folly, so-called after the builder and first owner, Jasper Fisher, who died in 1579/80, was in the fifteen eighties the residence of the Earl of Oxford. It was later to become Devonshire House and Thomas Fuller (1608-1661) informs us that Edward Alleyn "was born in the aforesaid parish (i.e. St. Botolph's, Bishopsgate), near Devonshire House, where now is the sign of the <PIE>. He was bred a Stage-player" . . . [Worthies of England (1662), by Thomas Fuller.] At the sign of the <PIE>, one would naturally expect to find an inn, which of course, would have given its name to the alley, not the other way round; so in spite of Fuller's "now," the inn must have existed, under that name, at least as early as 1615. <PIE> (or Mag<PIE>) Alley was just south of Devonshire Street, leading to Devonshire House (See map of Bishopsgate Ward in Strype's edition of Stow), and <PIE> Alley presumably led to the <PIE> Inn, which was, therefore, not only "near" but "next" to Devonshire House. As G. F. Warner writes in his Introduction to the Catalogue of MSS. and Muniments of Alleyn's College, Dulwich: "Fuller's often-quoted statement that he (Edward Alleyn) "was born 'near Devonshire House, where now is the sign of the <PIE>' is fully confirmed by the mention of <PYE> Alley and Fisher's Folly, the old name of Devonshire House, in close connexion with his father's property." [G. F. Warner, p. XV.]

Now, it is well-known that Edward Alleyn was baptized at St. Botolph's without Bishopsgate, on 2nd September 1566, and that his father was Edward Alleyn, of Willen, Bucks., Innholder and Porter to the Queen, but it seems to have been almost forgotten that he also had an inn in Bishopsgate. The facts are clearly summarized by Warner (p. xvi). In 1555 and again in 1557 he is designated "of London Yeoman," but "in subsequent deeds, the first of which records his purchase of a house in Bishopsgate in 1566 . . . he uniformly appears as 'innholder' and is so described in his will, dated 10th Sept., 1570 ... The statement made by Malcolm (Londinium Redivivum, 1802, vol. i, p. 345) and noticed by Hunter as 'a very curious fact', that in the entry of his burial at St. Botolph's, on 13th Sept., 1570, he is called 'poete to the Queene', may be readily dismissed. On referring to the register I found the word to be 'porter', and the title 'one of the Queen's Majesties, porters is given him in a document ... dated 1567.' "

John and Edward Alleyn inherited from their father other property in the same parish, [Eccles, p. 65.] but all the evidence goes to show that the four messuages they bought from their mother and stepfather in 1585 comprised their late father's inn. That John, already an innholder in 1580, should wish to own it and that their mother should be willing to sell it is not surprising, and as for their stepfather, he was a haberdasher by trade and may not have been interested in inns; but where does Edward come into the picture? Well, by the autumn of 1585, he was a talented and no doubt ambitious actor of nineteen, and at this period, plays were frequently performed at the city inns. Whether or not, the <PIE> had already been used for this purpose—as it may have been even in their father's time—it is almost inconceivable that it would not be so used under the joint ownership of John and Edward Alleyn. To present plays there, with John as landlord of the inn and Edward as principal actor, would be to their mutual advantage; moreover, that great patron of players, the Earl of Oxford, was their next-door neighbour and almost certainly their ground landlord, but Oxford had his own company of players and they could hardly have played there as the servants of any other lord. Whether the whole company of the Earl of Worcester, as it stood in 1583, passed into the service of the Earl of Oxford in 1585 is immaterial, but I suggest that Edward Alleyn, Robert Browne, Richard Jones and James Tunstall did. John Alleyn, not having been a member of Worcester's in 1583, is a case apart, but as landlord of the inn where Oxford's men played, he would be in a unique position in relation to that company and a sharer in his own right, independently of his status as an actor. Nothing is known of the "<PIE>" as a playhouse, but then, there were many inns in London where plays were performed and little enough is known of any of them. Neither is it known where Oxford's men played, apart from the Boar's Head (after their amalgamation with Worcester's), but we do know that they flourished in the fifteen-eighties and that, broadly speaking, Oxford was living at Fisher's Folly throughout this decade. Shortly before Christmas, 1588, he sold it, and it was just nine days after Christmas that John and Edward Alleyn bought up Richard Jones's share of that common stock of play-books and apparel held jointly by these three and Robert Browne. When a company was dissolved it was the normal practice to distribute the common stock among the sharers, who could then each sell his own assignment as he pleased; in the case of play-books, generally to another company or a publisher. But the Alleyns could evidently afford, not only to keep what was due to them personally, but to buy in much, if not all, of the remainder, obviously with a view to making a fresh start, the only question being the identity of the company to which all four of the joint owners belonged on 3rd January 1589; if the Admiral's, they revived it after a period of instability and uncertainty: if Oxford's they were obliged to seek a new patron, for Oxford was no longer available. In June 1588, his first wife, Anne Cecil, daughter of Lord Burghley, had died. Burghley had not only been Oxford's guardian during his minority, but was Master of the Court of Wards, and as Professor Joel Hurstfield puts it:

"The Earl had entered into obligations to purchase his marriage from the Court of Wards, a necessary procedure before he could be free to marry Anne Cecil. The full price of his marriage had never been paid and this, and other debts, had long hung over him in the Court of Wards. Then, early in 1589, shortly after the death of Anne, Burghley instituted proceedings against the Earl for this debt, and some of his lands were seized and held for payment." [The Queen's Wards, p. 253.]

It seems that he had sold Fisher's Folly just in time, and at about the same time he sold Oxford Place, near London Stone, to Sir John Hart who, as Stow tells us, kept his mayoralty there.

Oxford was certainly in no position at this time to maintain a London company of players, and a company travelling under his name is last heard of at Maidstone in 1589-90. At about the same time, a company under the patronage of Edward, 4th Earl of Worcester (son of the third Earl) makes its first appearance, at Coventry. It was this company which, sooner or later, was amalgamated with Oxford's.

Meanwhile, on 14th July 1589, the Privy Council had written to Adlerman John Hart and others, "requiring them to take order for the relief of John Allen, "servaunte to me the Lo. Admirall," against a certain Dr. Martin, "who seeketh by indirecte meanes to make frustrate a lease of a certain tenement and a garden demised by one John Roise to the suppliant's father and Mother and himselfe…" [G. F. Warner, p. 85.] This letter, signed by Charles Howard (the Lord Admiral) and other members of the Privy Council contains what seems to be the earliest known reference to John Alleyn as "servant to the Lord Admiral." It is well known that he was in the Admiral's service "in" 1589 and I have, therefore, gone to a good deal of trouble to find out on what contemporary evidence this rather vague knowledge is based. According to the Shakespeare Encyclopaedia, he was "listed in 1589 as a member of the Admiral's Men and as part owner, with his brother Edward, of 'playinge apparelles . . .'" which rather implies that the source of both pieces of information was the same; but as I have said, Richard Jones's deed of sale names no company. The odds were, of course, heavily against finding any such allusion, dated 1589 and earlier than 3rd January, but the above letter was in fact written six months after the deed of sale.

In the deed of sale, itself, John Alleyn was described as a "Citizen and Innholder of London," and though no parish is named, he was presumably still an innholder of St. Botolph's without Bishopsgate; as he is known to have been just a year before, or less. Now, I am not suggesting that the property referred to in the letter was identical with that bought by John and Edward from their mother and step-father in 1585, obviously it was not, though it may have been adjacent to it. Anyway, this dispute over the lease is worth noting for what it tells us of John's reduced circumstances shortly after the sale of Fisher's Folly. He was badly in need of a powerful friend at this time and found one in the Admiral, who may have taken him into his own household, but there is no need to suppose that he became a member of the Admiral's company before November 1590, when he and James Tunstall were playing at the Theatre. The dispute over the lease was apparently still unresolved in December, 1589, when Howard drafted a letter to Sir William Drury, D.C.L., "umpire in the above dispute, asking his friendship and favour in behalf of his servant, John Allen." [G. F. Warner, p. 86.] We do not know the outcome, and neither do we know what became at this time of those four messages next to Fisher's Folly, though we may infer from the lease of 1615 that either John or Edward, or both, still owned "<PYE> Alley," but neither of them seems to have lived there after 1592, when John Alleyn describes himself as late of the parish of St. Botolph without Bishopsgate.

In 1594, when the Admiral's men, as a reorganised and independent company, finally settled at the Rose, under the leadership of Edward Alleyn, John did not go with them. This has been a puzzle to commentators, but if as I suggest, his chief interest was his inn, and his chief service to his brother and "*the COMPANY*"' had been the provision and supervision of a place to act in, there was no point. He had been supplanted by Henslowe.

I do not claim to have proved conclusively either that plays were performed at the <PIE> in Bishopsgate Street; or that Robert Browne, Richard Jones, both the Alleyns and James Tunstall were members of Oxford's company from 1585 to 1589; but there is enough mutually corroborative evidence for a working hypothesis and I am content to leave it at that for the present. It is the sustained inter-action of fact and hypothesis, leading to the discovery of "new" facts, that counts in the long term and the Review is our laboratory.>>
---------------------­-----------------------­----
"The more to be admired q[uia]
[Shaksper] was not a *COMPANY keeper*
lived IN SHOREDITCH, wouldn't be *DEBAUCHed* ,
& if invited to writ: he was IN PAINE."
................................................
. *DEBAUCH* , v. t. & i. [F. D['E]BAUCHER,
. cf. F. bauge LAIR OF A WILD BOAR]
-------------------------­­--------------------­-------
John M. Rollett THE OXFORDIAN Volume II 1999
http://www.oxfordian.com/99-Ro­­llet-Dedication.pdf
.
If you look at the acrostic poem by Anthony Munday,
you will immediately see that the 6-2-4 layout of
the Dedication corresponds exactly to the name
.
. EDWARD DE VERE:
.
[E]xcept I should IN freendship seeme ingrate,
[D]enying duty, where to I am bound;
[W]ith letting slip your Honour's worthy state,
[A]t all assayes, which I have Noble found
[R]ight well I might refrayne to handle PEN:
[D]enouncing aye *the COMPANY OF MEN*.
------------­------------------------------­-------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelangelo#Personal_life

<<Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (6 March 1475 – 18 February 1564) was a devout Catholic whose faith deepened at the end of his life. He was abstemious in his personal life, and once told his apprentice, Ascanio Condivi: "However rich I may have been, I have always lived like a poor man." He was by nature a solitary and melancholy person, bizzarro e fantastico,

a man who "withdrew himself from *the COMPANY OF MEN*."

It is impossible to know for certain whether Michelangelo had physical relationships but the nature of his sexuality is made apparent in his poetry. He wrote over three hundred sonnets and madrigals. The longest sequence displaying a great romantic friendship, was written to Tommaso dei Cavalieri (c. 1509–1587), who was 23 years old when Michelangelo met him in 1532, at the age of 57. These make up the first large sequence of poems in any modern tongue addressed by one man to another, predating Shakespeare's sonnets to the fair youth by fifty years:
...................................................
. I feel as lit by fire a cold countenance
. That burns me from afar and keeps itself ice-chill;
. A strength I feel two shapely arms to fill
. Which without motion moves every balance.

— (Michael Sullivan, translation)
...................................................
Cavalieri replied: "I swear to return your love. Never have I loved a man more than I love you, never have I wished for a friendship more than I wish for yours." Cavalieri remained devoted to Michelangelo until his death.

In 1542 Michelangelo met Cecchino dei Bracci who died only a year later, inspiring Michelangelo to write forty-eight funeral epigrams. Some of the objects of Michelangelo's affections, and subjects of his poetry, took advantage of him: the model Febo di Poggio asked for money in response to a love-poem, and a second model, Gherardo Perini, stole from him shamelessly.

The openly homoerotic nature of the poetry was a source of discomfort to later generations. Michelangelo's grandnephew, Michelangelo Buonarroti the Younger, published the poems in *1623* with the gender of pronouns changed.

Late in life, Michelangelo nurtured a great platonic love for the poet and noble widow Vittoria Colonna, whom he met in Rome in 1536 or 1538 and who was in her late forties at the time. They wrote sonnets for each other and were in regular contact until she died. These sonnets mostly deal with the spiritual issues that occupied them. Condivi recalls Michelangelo's saying that his sole regret in life was that he did not kiss the widow's face in the same manner that he had her hand.>>
-------------------------------------------------------
Nicole wrote:

<<Abraham Holland's anti-Globe and anti-gallant invective
after the style of Ben Jonson - compare following to
Jonson's First Folio mockery of the vain praise of
Shakespeare's foolish audience (adulterate censures).
Jonson's 'judicious theatre of one' also appears
- a particularly anti-Shakespearean stance...
.................................................
Author: Holland, Abraham, d. 1626.
Title: Naumachia, or Hollands sea-fight Date: 1622

A Caveat to his Muse

Well Minion you'le be gadding forth then? Goe,
Goe, hast unto thy speedy overthrow:
And since thou wilt not take my warning: Hence,
Learne thy owne ruine by experience.
Alas poore Maid (if so I her may call
Who itches to be prostitute to all
Adulterate censures) were it not for thee
Better, to live in sweet securitie
In my small cell, than flying rashly out,
Be whoop't, and hiss't, and gaz'd at all about
Like a day-owle: Faith Misris you'le be put
One of these daies to serve some driveling slut,
.
To wrap her sope in, or a least be droven
To keepe a <PIE> from scorching in the Oven:
Or else expos'd a laughing stock to sots,
To cloke Tobacco, or stop Mustard pots,
.
Thou wilt be grac't if so thou canst but win
To infold Frankincense or Mackrills in,
You deem it a matter of high worth
To have a fame among 'em: New come forth:
And thinke your chiefe felicity is marr'd
If you be not perch't up in Paules Church-yard
Where men a farre may know you in a trice,
By some new-fangled, brasse-cut Frontispice.
Such book's indeed as now-dayes can passé
Had need to have their faces made of brasse.
.................................................
Holland wrote an elegy to Henry de Vere suggesting that
Sydney crowned Henry de Vere with bays in Elysium and
'daign'd to sing his praise'. He also is careful to
describe de Vere as a soldier and not a courtly gallant.
-------------------------------------------------------
After his library FIRE of 1623 Ben Jonson (1572-1637)
wrote of his LOSS in "An Execration upon Vulcan"
.......................................................
Thou mightst have had (me) perish, piece by peic[E],
To light Tobacco, or sa[V]e roasted Geese.
Sindg[E] Capons, or *poor Piggs* , d[R]oping their Eyes;
Cond[E]mn'd me to the Ovens wit{H} the <PIES> ;
.....................................................
_________ <= 19 =>
.
. h{O}u m i g h t s t h a v e h a d(m e)
. {E}p{E}r i s h,p i{E}c e b y p{E}i c[E],
. T{O}l i g h t T{O}b a c c{O|O}r s a[V]
. {E}r o a s t{E}d G{E|E}s{E}S i n d g[E]
. {C}a p o n s{O}r p{O|O}r P i g g s,d[R]
. {O}p i n g t h{E}i r{E}y e s;C o n d[E]
. m n'd m e t{O}t h e{O}v e n s w i t{H}
. t h e<P I{E}S>;
.
[E.VERE] 19 : Prob. ~ 1 in 1020
19 {E.O.}s : Prob. ~ 1 in 52
--------------------------------------------------------
_______________ <= 19 =>
.
. T OTHEO - (N) l ___{I} _ <E>B E G E T T E RO
. F THESE_- (I) n __-{S} - U<I>N G S O N N ET
. S MrWha_- (L) L __ [H]A {P} <P>{I}_(N){S}S{S}EA
. N Dthat___ (E) T __ [E]R N_ <I> T__(I) E<P>R OM
. I SEDB Y O u ___- [R]E _ V <E> R_ (L)<I>V I NG
. <P>OEtW I s h ____ [E]T __ H (T) H__(E) W E L LW
. <I>ShIN- G a _____ [d V e] __ N (T) u _____ ReRI NS
. <E>tTIN G fort----_________ H (T) t
........................................................
. Probability of Upper & Lower (NILE)'s ~ 1/176,000
. Probability of 4 oven <PIE>'s ~ 1/38,000
------------------------------------------------------------
Donne, John (post. publ.: 1633)

To. E. of D. with Six Holy Sonnets

See, Sr, how as the suns hott masculine flame
*Begetts STRANGE* creatures on (NILEs) durty slime
In me your fatherly yet Lusty rime
(for th[E]se Songs are the fr[U]it) haue wrought th[E] same.
But though th'[E]ngendring force f[R]o whence they came
Be strong inough, and nature do admit
Seauen to be borne at one, I send as yet
But six, they say the seventh hath still some maime.
I chose your iudgment, wch the same degree
Doth wth her Sister your invention hold
As fyer these drossy rim[E]s to {P|U]r{I}fe{E}
Or as [E]lixa[R] to *CHANGE* them to gold.
You are that Alchimist wch allways had
Witt, whose one sparke could make good things of bad.

[E.UEER] 5
[E.UEER] 16 : Prob. both ~ 1 in 325
-------------------------------------------------------
In the fashion of Peter Nockolds:
....................................................
"Shakespeare": "They tke the *FLOW o' the NILE*
____ By certain scales i' the Pyramid."
....................................................
. T
. O T H
. E(O)N L I
. E B(E)G E{T}T
. E R O(F)T H{E}S E
. I N S U(I)N G{S}O N N
. E T S M R(W|H}A L L H A P
. P I N E(S|S|E|A}N D T H A T E
. T E R N I(T|I)E[P]R O M I S E D B
. Y O U R E V(E|R)L[I]V I N G P O E T W
. I S H E T H T(H|E)W[E]L L W I S H I N G A
. D V E N T U R E R I N[S]E T T I N G F O R T H
....................................................
[PIES] Prob. in center bottom ~ 1 in 32,000
....................................................
{SET}
{HAPI} Prob. in center ~ 1 in in 16,000
(E.WIFE.O.)
.................................................................
<<{HAPI} (Golden Dawn) One of the Four Sons of Horus, {HAPI}
. was represented as a mummified man with the head of a *BABOON*.
.He was the protector of the lungs of the deceased, & was protected
. by the goddess Nephthys. The name {HAPI}, spelled with different
. HIEROGLYPHs, in most but not all cases, is also the name
. of the god who was the personification of the River *NILE*
. depicted as a corpulent man [Falstaff? / N(ev)ILE?]
. with a *CROWN of LILIES* (Upper {NILE} )
______ or papyrus plants (Lower {NILE>). - Shawn C. Knight
--------------------------------------------------------------------
<<The Least Successful Collector Betsy Baker played a central role in
the history of collecting. She was employed as a servant in the house
of John Warburton (1682-1759) who had amassed a fine collection of 58
1st edition plays, including most of the works of Shakespeare. One day
Warburton returned home to find 55 of them charred beyond legibility.
Betsy had either burned them or used them as <PIE> bottoms. The
remaining 3 folios are now in the British Museum.>> - Stephen PIlE
.
. http://hometown.aol.com/clasz/Chap9.html
.
[NOTE: some 60 manuscripts of plays of this period eventually come
. into the hands of a collector named John Warburton* (1682-1759).
.
Many are the only surviving coPIES of plays that had never been
printed. Unfortunately Warburton was careless with them and
his servant, Betsy Baker, made use of them to light her stove
and line the bottom of <PIES>.

In the end only three survived: DEKKER (1572-1632),
Ford (1586-1640) & Massinger (1583-1640).]>>
-------------------------------------------------------------
Dedicatory Verse by Ignoto in Spenser's Faerie Queene.
..........................................
TO looke upon a work[E] of [R]ar[E] (de)[V]is{E}
The which a workman setteth out to view,
A{N}d not to yield it the *DE(s)ERVED* prise,
That {U}nto such a workmanship is dew,
Doth eithe{R} prove the iudgement to be naught
Or els doth shew a mind with *{E}NVY* fraught.
..........................................................
_______________ <= 34 =>
.
. TOlookeuponaw{O}rk [E] of [R] ar [E](de)[V] is {E} Thewh
. ichaworkmanse t te t ho u tt o vi e wA {N} dnott
. oyieldittheDE(s)ER V ED p ri s eT h at {U} ntosu
. chaworkmanshi p is d ew D ot h ei t he {R} prove
. theiudgementt o be n au g ht
......................
.
. a w {O}
. r k [E]
. o f [R]
. a r [E]
. (d e) [V]
. i s {E}

[{E}VERE{O}] -3
Prob. [E.VERE] in first Ignoto line ~ 1 in 1,040
------------------------------------------------------
Dedicatory Verse to Oxford in Spenser's Fairie Queene.
..........................................
To the right Honourable the Earle
of Oxenford, Lord high Chamberlayne of
England. &c.
.
REc(E)ive most Noble Lord in gentle gree,
The unripe fruit of an u(N)ready wit:
Which BY THY COUNT{E|N}aunc[E| D}oth cra[V|e} to bee
D[E]f(E)nded f[R]om foule [E]n{V|I}es poisnous bit.
Which so to doe may th(E)e right w{E|L}l befit,
Sith th'antique glory of thine auncest{R}y
Under a *SHADY VELE* is therein writ,
And eke thin{E} owne lon(G) living memory,
Succeeding them in TRUE nobility:
And also for the love, which thou doest beare
To *th'Heliconian YMPS* , and they to thee,
They unto thee, and thou to them most dear[E]:
Deare as thou a[R]t unto thy self[E], so love
{T}h{A}t {L}o[V]e{S} & honours the[E], as doth behove.
..........................................
[EVERE] 8,-13, 40
{TALVS} 2
.
Prob. 3[E.VERE]s skip < 41 ~ 1 in 2,250)
Prob. {TALVS}/{TALUS}/{TALOS} skip 2 ~ 1 in 2,000
------------------------------------------------------------
Donne, John (1572 - 1631)

To Mr T. W.

Pregnant agayne wt th'old twins Hope & Feare
Ofte haue I askt for thee, both how & where
Thou wert, and what my hopes of Letters wer[E].
As in ye Streets sly beggers na[R]rowly
Marke motions of the giu[E]rs hand & ey
and euer more concea[V]e some hope therby.
And now thyn[E] alms is giuen, thy Letters red
the body risen agayne, the wch was dead
and thy poore sterveling bountifully fed.
After this banquet my Soule doth say Grace
and prayse th[E]e fo[R]'it, & z[E]alo[U]sly [E]mbrace
thy Love, though I thincke thy Love in this case
To be as gluttons wch say midst ther meate
They Love yt best of wch they most do eate.

[E.UERE] -4
[E.VERE] -26
----------------------------------------------------------
Benson & Cotes's 1640 Sonnets publication
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Benson_%28publisher%29
......................................................
TO THE READ[E]R. The[R]e presu{M|E] (und[E]r f{A|V]o[U|R])
to p{R|E]s[E]nt to {Y|O|U|R] view {S|o]m[E] exce[L|L]ent and
sweetely composed Poems, of Master William Shakespeare, Which
in themselves appeare of the same purity, the Authour himselfe
then living avouched ; they had not the fortune by reason of
their Infancie in his death to have the due accomodatio of
proportionable glory with the rest of hi[S EVER-LIVIN(g) WOR]-
kes, yet the lines of themselves WILL afFORD you a more
authentick approbation than my assurance any way can, to invite
your allowance, in your perusall you shall find them Seren,
cleere and eligantly plaine, such gentle straines as shall recreate
and not perplexe your braine, no intricate or cloudy stuffe to
puzzell intellect, but perfect eloquence ; such as *will RAISE* your
admiration to his p*RAISE*:this assurance I know will not differ from
your acknowledgment.
......................................................
____ <= 8 =>

. R[E]A D E R T H
. e[R]e p r e s u
. {M|E]u n d[E]r f
. {A|V]o[U|R]t o p
. {R|E]s[E]n t t o
. {Y|O|U|R]v i e *w*
. {S|o]m[E]e x c *e*
. [L|L]e n t a n *d*
. s*w*e e t e l y
. c*o*m p o s e d
. P*o*e m s,

{MARY S(idney)}
[Lo. O., E. VERE]
[Lo. UERE] [UERE]
.....................................
Prob. of [MARY S.] ~ 1 in 8,000
Prob. of 2[UERE]s ~ 1 in 1,800
Prob. of [EVERE] ~ 1 in 1,000

in the first 69 letters.
................................................................
of Master William Shakespeare, Which in themselves appeare of the same purity,
the Authour himselfe then living avouched ; they had not the fortune by reason of
their Infancie in his death to have the due accomodatio of proportionable glory
with the rest of his ever-living Workes, yet the lines of themselves will afford
you a more authentick approbation than my assurance any way can, to invite your
allowance, in your perusall you shall find them Seren, cleere and eligantly
plaine, such gentle straines as shall recreate and not perplexe your braine,
no intricate or cloudy stuffe to puzzell intellect, but perfect eloquence; such
as will raise your admiration to his praise: this assurance I know will not
differ from your acknowledgment. And certaine I am, my opinion will be seconded
by the sufficiency of these ensuing lines ; I have beene somewhat solicitus
to bring this forth to the perfect view of all men ;

and in so doing glad to be serviceable for the
continuanc[E] of glo[R]y to th[E] [D]eser[V|E]d
*AUTHOR* in these his Poems.
................................
. <= 6 =>
.
. a n c [E] o f
. g l o [R] y t
. o t h [E][D]e
. s e r [V][E]d
. *A U T H O R*
. i n t h e s
. e h i s P o
. e m s.

[ED][VERE] -6

Prob. of [VERE] at end ~ 1 in 310
--------------------------------------------------------
. _As You Like It_ Act IV, scene I
.
ORLANDO: For E.VER and a day.
.
ROSALIND: Say 'a day,' without the 'E.VER.' No, no, Orlando;
. men are April when they *woo*, December when they *wed*:
-----------------------------------------------------------
Benson & Cotes's 1640 Sonnets publication
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Benson_%28publisher%29
......................................................
of Master William Shakespeare, Which in themselves
appeare of the same purity, the Authour himselfe then
living avouched ; they had not the fortune by reason of
their Infancie in his death {to} have the due accomodatio of
proportionable glory wit{H} the rest of hi[S EVER-LIVIN(g) WOR]
-kes, yet the lines of thems{E}lves WILL afFORD you a more
authentick approbation tha{N} my assurance any way can, to invite
your allowance, in you{R} perusall you shall find them Seren,
cleere and eligantl{Y} plaine, such gentle straines as shall
recreate and not perplexe your braine, no intricate or
cloudy stuffe to puzzell intellect, but perfect eloquence;
such as *will RAISE* your admiration to his p*RAISE*: this
assurance I know will not differ from your acknowledgment.
......................................................
. <= 47 =>
.

theirInfancieinhisdeath {to} havethedueaccomodatioo
fproportionableglorywit {H} therestofhiSEVERLIVINgW
ORkesyetthelinesofthems {E} lvesWILLafFORDyouamorea
uthentickapprobationtha {N} myassuranceanywaycantoi
nviteyourallowanceinyou {R} perusallyoushallfindthe
mSerencleereandeligantl {Y} plainesuchgentlestraine
sasshallrecreateandnotp e rplexeyourbrainenointri
cateorcloudystuffetopuz z ellintellectbutperfecte
loquencesuchaswillRAISE y ouradmirationtohispRAISE:

{to/HENRY} 47 : Prob. ~ 1 in 1375
......................................................
And certain{E I} am, my opinio{N} will be secon{D}ed by the
suff{I}ciency of the{S}e *ENSUING* lines; I have beene somewhat
solicitus to *BRING this FORTH* to the perfect view of all men;
and in so doing glad to be serviceable for the continuance
of glory to *th[E DE(s)ERVED]Author* in these his Poems.
.....................................................
. <= 12 =>
.
. A n d c e r t a i n {E I}
. a m,m y o p i n i o {N}w
. i l l b e s e c o n {D}e
. d b y t h e s u f f {I}c
. i e n c y o f t h e {S}e
. *E N S U I N G*l i n e s
.............................
{SIDNE/I} -12 : Prob. in "*ENSUING* lines" line ~ 1 in 63,000
------------------------------------------
http://www.poetrynook.com/poem/satire-9-0
. [I]ohn [M]arston [S]atire nine:
.
Grim-fac'd Reproofe , sparkle with threatning eye
Bend thy sower browes in my tart po[E]sie.
A[V]ant y[E]e cur[R]es, ho[U|L)e in [S|o)me cl(O)udie mist,
*QUAKE* to behold a sharp-fang'd Satyrist.
...........................................
. <= 5 =>
.
. m y t a r
. t p o [E] s
. i e. A [V] a
. n t y [E] e
. c u r [R] e
. s, h o [U](L)
. e i n [S](o)
. m e c l (O)
. u d i e m
. i s t, Q u
. a k e t o
. b e h o l
. d a s h a
. r p- f a n
. g' d S a t
. y r i s t.

[E.VERUS] 5: Prob. at start or end ~ 1 in 42,000
(Lo.O) 5
...............................................
...............................................
Ill-tutor'd pe[D]ant, Mortimers numb[E]rs
With muck-pit esc[U]line filth bescumb[E]rs.
Now th'{APE} chatte[R]s, and is as malecont[E]nt
As a bill-patch'd doore, whose entrailes out haue sent
And spewd theyr tenant.
...........................................
. <= 17 =>
.
. I l l-t u t o r'd p[E|D] a n t,M o
. r t i m e r s n u m b[E] r s W i t
. h m u c k-p i t e s c[U] l i n e f
. i l t h b e s c u m b[E] r s.N o w
. t h'A p e c h a t t e[R] s,a n d i
. s a s m a l e c o n t[E] n t

[E/DEUERE] 17: Prob. at start ~ 1 in 1,675
...........................................
My soule adores iudiciall schollership,
But when to seruile imitatorship
Some spruce Athenian pen is prentized,
Tis WORSE then Apish. Fie, bee not flattered
With seeming *WORTH*, fond affectation
Befits an {APE}, and mumping Babilon.

. O what a tricksie lerned (NICKI)ng straine
. Is this applauded, sencles, modern vain!
. When late I heard it from sage Mutius lips
. How il me thought such wanton Iigging skips
. Beseem'd his *GRAVER* speech. Farre flie thy *FAME*
. Most, most, of me belou'd,
...............................................
. {whose silent name One letter bounds.}
...............................................
. Thy TRUE iudiciall stile
. I EVER honour, and if my loue beguile
. Not much my hopes, then thy unvalued *WORTH*
. Shall mount faire place, when {APES} are turned *FORTH*.
----------------------------------------------
Peirs Gaveston Earle of Cornwall
His life, death, and fortune.

by Drayton, Michael, 1563-1631.

FRom gloomy shaddowe of eternall night,
Where cole-black darknes keeps his lothsome cel,
And from those Ghostes, whose eyes abhorre the light,
From thence I come a wofull tale to tell:
Prepare the Stage, I meane to acte my parte,
Sighing the scenes from my tormented hart.
From Stygian lake, to gracelesse soules assign'd,
And from the floud of burning Acheron,
Where sinfull spirites are by the fier refinde,
The fearefull Ghost of wofull Gaueston:
With black-fac'd furies from the graues attended,
Vntill the tenor of my tale be ended.
Wing-footed Fame now sommons me from death,
In Fortunes triumph to aduance my glorie,
The blessed Heauens againe doe lend me breath,
Whilst I reporte this dolefull Tragick stori[E]:
That soule an[D] bodie, which d[E]ath once did s[U]nder,
Now meet[E] together to r[E]porte a wonde[R].
.................................................
. <= 12 =>
.
. W h i l s t I r e p o r
. t e t h i s d o l e f u
. l l T r a g i c k s t o
. r i [E]:T h a t s o u l e
. a n [D] b o d i e,w h i c
. h d [E] a t h o n c e d i
. d s [U] n d e r,N o w m e
. e t [E] t o g e t h e r t
. o r [E] p o r t e a w o n
. d e [R].
.
[E. DE UEER] 12 : Prob. at top ~ 1 in 1700
------------------------------------------------
. Astrophel and Stella 22
.
In highest way of heau'n the Sun did ride,
Progressing then from fair Twinnes golden place,
Hauing no mask of clouds before his face,
But streaming forth of heate in his chiefe pride;
When some fair ladies, by hard promise tied,
On horsebacke met him in his furious race;
Yet each prepar'd with fannes wel-shading grace
From that foes wounds their tender skinnes to hide.
Stella alone with face vnarmed marcht,
Either to do like him which op[E]n shone,
Or ca[R]elesse of th[E] wealth, beca[U]se her owne.
Y[E]t were the hi[D] and meaner b[E]auties parcht;
Her dainties bare went free: the cause was this:
The sun, that others burn'd, did her but kisse.
...............................................
. <= 11 =>
.
. E i t h e r t o d o l
. i k e h i m w h i c h
. o p [E] n s h o n e,O r
. c a [R] e l e s s e o f
. t h [E] w e a l t h,b e
. c a [U] s e h e r o w n
. e.Y [E] t w e r e t h e
. h i [D] a n d m e a n e
. r b [E] a u t i e s p a
. r c h t;
.
[E.DEUERE] -11
----------------------------------------------------------------
http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/deveres-dedicatory-poem-cardan/
................................................
The Earle of Oxenforde
To the Reader.

The labouring man, that tilles the fertile soyle,
And reapes the harvest fruite, hath not in deede
The gaine but payne, and if for all hys toyle
He gets the strawe, the Lord wyll have the seede.
The Manchet fyne falls not unto his share
On coursest cheat his hungrye stomacke feeds
The landlord doth, possesse th[E] fynest fare
He pulles the flowers, the other pl[U]ckes but weedes.
The *MASON* poore that builds th[E] Lordlye halles
Dwelles not in them, they are fo[R] hye degree
His cotage is, compact in paper wall[E]s
And not with bricke, or stone as others bee.
The idle Drone, that labours not at all
Suckes by the sweete, of honnye from the Bee
Who worketh most, to their share least doth fall,
Wyth due desert, reward will never bee.
The swiftest hare, unto the Mastive slow
Oft times doth fall, to him as for a praye:
The Greyhound thereby, both misse his game we know
For which he made, such speedy hast awaye.
So hee that takes, the payne to pen the booke
Reapes not the giftes, of goodlye golden Muse
But those gayne that, who on the work shallooke
And from the soure, the sweete by skill doth chuse.
For he that beates the bush the byrde not gets
But who sits still, and holdeth fast the nets.
......................................................
. <= 39 =>
.
. The landl orddothpossesseth [E] fynestfareHep
. ull esthe flowerstheotherpl [U] ckesbutweedes
. The *MASON* poorethatbuildsth [E] Lordlyehalles
. Dwe llesn otinthemtheyarefo [R] hyedegreeHisc
. ota geisc ompactinpaperwall [E] sAndnotwithbr
. ick eorst oneasothersbeeThe i dleDronethatl
. abo ursno tatallSuckesbythe s weeteofhonnye
---------------------------------------------------
http://www.bartleby.com/356/455.html
.
Michael Angelo by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Dedication : Prologue at *ISCHIA* →
.
Nothing that is shall perish utterly,
But perish only to revive again
In other forms, as clouds restore in rain
The exhalations of the land and sea.
Men build their houses from the *MASONRY*
Of ruined tombs; the passion and the pain
Of h[E]arts, that long ha[V]e ceased to beat, r[E]main
To throb in h[E]arts that are, or a[R]e to be.
So from old chronicles, where sleep in *DUST*
Names that once filled the world with trumpet ton[E]s,
I build this [V]erse; and flow[E]rs of song hav[E] thrust
Their [R]oots among the loose disjointed *STONES*,
Which to this end I fashion as I must.
Quickened are they that touch the Prophet's *BONES*.
...................................
. <= 14 =>
.
. O f r u i n e d t o m b s t
. h e p a s s i o n a n d t h
. e p a i n O f h[E]a r t s,t
. h a t l o n g h a[V]e c e a
. s e d t o b e a t,r[E]m a i
. n T o t h r o b i n h[E]a r
. t s t h a t a r e,o r a[R]e
. t o b e.S o f r o m o l d c
. h r o n i c l e s,w h e r e
. s l e e p i n*D U S T*N a m
. e s t h a t o n c e f i l l
. e d t h e w o r l d w i t h
. t r u m p e t t o n[E]s,I b
. u i l d t h i s[V]e r s e;a
. n d f l o w[E]r s o f s o n
. g h a v[E]t h r u s t T h e
. i r[R]o o t s a m o n g t h
. e l o o s e d i s j o i n t
. e d*S T O N E S*,
.
[E.VEER] 15, 12 : Prob. of both ~ 1 in 21,000
-------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer

nordicskiv2

unread,
Aug 2, 2018, 9:50:03 AM8/2/18
to
On Tuesday, July 31, 2018 at 11:20:07 PM UTC-4, Arthur Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter) wrote:
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> Diane [sic] Price:

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]


> . <= 66 =>
> .
> [D|E] AFlyMASKingthroStatelytroupesrichconceitedShewdhewe l lD E sE R VE D to L
> o[V] esdelightonhimtogazeAndhadnotloveherselfeintreatedO t he r NY M PH S ha d
> s[E] nthimBAIESEkeinpurpleroabesdistaindAmidsttheCentero f th i sc l im e Ih a
> v[E] heardsaiedothremaineOnewhosepowerFLOWethfarThatshou{L}dh{A}ve{B}en{E}of{O}
> u[R] rimeTheonelyobiectandtheSTAR
> .
> [D|E.VEER] 66

66?! That's a ridiculously long skip, Art!

More to the point, the string "DEVEER [sic]" does *not* occur as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 66 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]

> a man who "withdrew himself from *the COMPANY OF MEN*."

...but in Oxford's case, not from the company of boys.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]

> (E.WIFE.O.)

"EWIFEO [sic]" is moronic nonsense, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]

> . <= 47 =>
> .
>
> theirInfancieinhisdeath {to} havethedueaccomodatioo
> fproportionableglorywit {H} therestofhiSEVERLIVINgW
> ORkesyetthelinesofthems {E} lvesWILLafFORDyouamorea
> uthentickapprobationtha {N} myassuranceanywaycantoi
> nviteyourallowanceinyou {R} perusallyoushallfindthe
> mSerencleereandeligantl {Y} plainesuchgentlestraine
> sasshallrecreateandnotp e rplexeyourbrainenointri
> cateorcloudystuffetopuz z ellintellectbutperfecte
> loquencesuchaswillRAISE y ouradmirationtohispRAISE:
>
> {to/HENRY} 47 : Prob. ~ 1 in 1375

The string "TOHENRY" does not occur as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 47 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]

> . <= 12 =>
> .
> . A n d c e r t a i n {E I}
> . a m,m y o p i n i o {N}w
> . i l l b e s e c o n {D}e
> . d b y t h e s u f f {I}c
> . i e n c y o f t h e {S}e
> . *E N S U I N G*l i n e s
> .............................
> {SIDNE/I} -12 :

The string "SIDNEI" does not occur as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 12 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.

[Crackpot cryptography snipped]

> . The landl orddothpossesseth [E] fynestfareHep
> . ull esthe flowerstheotherpl [U] ckesbutweedes
> . The *MASON* poorethatbuildsth [E] Lordlyehalles
> . Dwe llesn otinthemtheyarefo [R] hyedegreeHisc
> . ota geisc ompactinpaperwall [E] sAndnotwithbr
> . ick eorst oneasothersbeeThe i dleDronethatl
> . abo ursno tatallSuckesbythe s weeteofhonnye

Excellent, Art! You have finally begun to consider equidistant letter sequences of skip one! If you begin doing this systematically, and if you learn to read English, you will *finally* begin to divine the meaning of the texts that baffle you so.

[Crackpot cryptography snipped}

> -------------------------------------
> Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)

Arthur Neuendorffer

unread,
Aug 2, 2018, 11:38:44 AM8/2/18
to
Neufer wrote:
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> . <= 66 =>
> .
> [D|E] AFlyMASKingthroStatelytroupesrichconceitedShewdhewe l lD E sE R VE D to L
> o[V] esdelightonhimtogazeAndhadnotloveherselfeintreatedO t he r NY M PH S ha d
> s[E] nthimBAIESEkeinpurpleroabesdistaindAmidsttheCentero f th i sc l im e Ih a
> v[E] heardsaiedothremaineOnewhosepowerFLOWethfarThatshou{L}dh{A}ve{B}en{E}of{O}
> u[R] rimeTheonelyobiectandtheSTAR
> .
> [D|E.VEER] 66
------------------------------------------------------------
Lea wrote:

<<66?! That's a ridiculously long skip, Art!

More to the point, the string "DEVEER [sic]" does *not* occur as
an equidistant letter sequence of skip 66 -- or for that matter, as an
equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.>>
............................................................
And...it occurs in only one of two early versions of CEPHALUS
& PROCRIS and is of the less preferred "DE VEER" spelling.

All this is taken into account in the probabilities:
...................................................................
[D/E.VEER] 66 : Prob. in *ADON/purple roabes* stanzas ~ 1 in 120
{LABEO} 3 : Prob. in *ADON/purple roabes* stanzas ~ 1 in 3,000
-------------------------------------------------------------------
https://hankwhittemore.com/tag/dr-roger-stritmatter/
Whittemore's 32nd Reason Shake-speare was the Earl of Oxford

<<Attached to [Thomas Edwards Ovid translation] Narcissus was an “envoy” or postscript
in several stanzas of verse, identifying major poets by characters in their works:

“Collyn Clout” for Spenser; “Rosamond” for Daniel; “Leander” for Marlowe;
and “Adon” for Shakespeare.

This was followed immediately by reference to a poet “in purple robes distained
… whose power floweth far” with his “bewitching pen” and “golden art” that
should make him “the only object and the star” of England’s writers.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------------
<<L'Envoy to [NARCISSUS], by Thomas Edwards,
from a poem in Cephalus & Procris (1595)>>

CEPHALUS & PROCRIS. NARCISSUS. Aurora musae amica.
LONDON Imprinted by Iohn Wolfe. 1595.
.
. Narcissus, L’Envoy
.
. *ADON [D|E]AFly MASKing* thro,
. Stately troupes rich conceited,
. Shew'd he well *DE(s)ERVED* to,
. Lo[V]es delight on him to gaze,
. And had not love her selfe intreated,
. Other NYMPHS had s[E]nt him *BAIES* .
.
. Eke in purple roabes distaind,
. Amid'st the Center of this clime,
. I hau[E] heard saie doth remaine,
. One whose power FLOWeth far,
. That shou{L}d h{A}ve {B}en{E} of {O}u[R] rime,
. The onely obiect and *the STAR* .
.......................................................
. <= 66 =>
.
[D E] AFlyMASKingthroStatelytroupesrichconceitedShewdhewe l lD E sE R VE D to L
o[V] esdelightonhimtogazeAndhadnotloveherselfeintreatedO t he r NY M PH S ha d
s[E] nthimBAIESEkeinpurpleroabesdistaindAmidsttheCentero f th i sc l im e Ih a
v[E] heardsaiedothremaineOnewhosepowerFLOWethfarThatshou{L}dh{A}ve{B}en{E}of{O}
u[R] rimeTheonelyobiectandtheSTAR
.
[D/E.VEER] 66 : Prob. in *ADON/purple roabes* stanzas ~ 1 in 120
{LABEO} 3 : Prob. in *ADON/purple roabes* stanzas ~ 1 in 3,000
----------------------------------------------------------------
Diane Price: "The first remark raising a question about the
authorship of a Shakespeare work was made by contemporary
Thomaas Edwards. In 3 stanzas of a longer 1595 poem, Edwards
implied that the author of Venus & Adonis was an aristocrat."
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer

nordicskiv2

unread,
Aug 2, 2018, 1:36:51 PM8/2/18
to
On Thursday, August 2, 2018 at 11:38:44 AM UTC-4, Arthur Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter) wrote:

> Neufer (aka Noonedafter) wrote:
> > ------------------------------------------------------------
> > . <= 66 =>
> > .
> > [D|E] AFlyMASKingthroStatelytroupesrichconceitedShewdhewe l lD E sE R VE D to L
> > o[V] esdelightonhimtogazeAndhadnotloveherselfeintreatedO t he r NY M PH S ha d
> > s[E] nthimBAIESEkeinpurpleroabesdistaindAmidsttheCentero f th i sc l im e Ih a
> > v[E] heardsaiedothremaineOnewhosepowerFLOWethfarThatshou{L}dh{A}ve{B}en{E}of{O}
> > u[R] rimeTheonelyobiectandtheSTAR
> > .
> > [D|E.VEER] 66
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> Lea wrote:
>
> <<66?! That's a ridiculously long skip, Art!
>
> More to the point, the string "DEVEER [sic]" does *not* occur as
> an equidistant letter sequence of skip 66 -- or for that matter, as an
> equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.>>
> ............................................................
> And...it occurs in only one of two early versions of CEPHALUS
> & PROCRIS and is of the less preferred "DE VEER" spelling.
>
> All this is taken into account in the probabilities:

How is it "taken into account", Art? You mean, you just made up some numbers?

[Crackpot cryptography snipped]

> Diane [sic] Price:

Who on earth is "Diane [sic]" Price, Art?

But don't feel too bad, Art: for someone who neVER learned the Latin alphabet at George Mason Elementary, distinguishing "Diane" from "Diana" is too much to expect -- it's too exacting for an illiterate.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)

Arthur Neuendorffer

unread,
Aug 2, 2018, 3:23:16 PM8/2/18
to
> Neufer wrote:
>> ------------------------------------------------------------
>> . <= 66 =>
>> .
>> [D|E] AFlyMASKingthroStatelytroupesrichconceitedShewdhewe l lD E sE R VE D to L
>> o[V] esdelightonhimtogazeAndhadnotloveherselfeintreatedO t he r NY M PH S ha d
>> s[E] nthimBAIESEkeinpurpleroabesdistaindAmidsttheCentero f th i sc l im e Ih a
>> v[E] heardsaiedothremaineOnewhosepowerFLOWethfarThatshou{L}dh{A}ve{B}en{E}of{O}
>> u[R] rimeTheonelyobiectandtheSTAR
>> .
>> [D|E.VEER] 66
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> Lea wrote:
>
> <<66?! That's a ridiculously long skip, Art!
>
> More to the point, the string "DEVEER [sic]" does *not* occur as
> an equidistant letter sequence of skip 66 -- or for that matter, as an
> equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.>>
> ............................................................
Neufer wrote:
>
> And...it occurs in only one of two early versions of CEPHALUS
> & PROCRIS and is of the less preferred "DE VEER" spelling.
>
> All this is taken into account in the probabilities:

Lea wrote:

<<How is it "taken into account", Art? You mean, you just made up some numbers?>>
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Skip of 2 to 66: # of possible positions = (66-1) x 161
..................................................................
less preferred "DE VEER" spelling: Prob. ~1 in 480 => Prob. ~1 in 240
only one of two early versions: : Prob. ~1 in 240 => Prob. ~1 in 120
--------------------------------------------------
> Diane [sic] Price:

Who on earth is "Diane [sic]" Price, Art?

That's what her friends call her, Dave; just like we refer to you as Dweeb or Lea.
--------------------------------------------------
https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/muchado/forum/price.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GEQNWpo1PSs

<<Diana Price, who describes herself as an anti-Stratfordian, has one overriding goal: to get the academic establishment to take the Shakespeare authorship question seriously. At first an agnostic on the authorship, Price set out in mid life on a scholarly inquiry into just what is known, and not known, about the life of the man from Stratford and the claims made for him. "The academic community does not accept the authorship as a legitimate question," she says here in a Web-exclusive interview with FRONTLINE. "But what I'm trying to do is play by their rules and earn their respect and make it very difficult for them to just flick it aside."

With no formal academic credentials as a literary historian, Price has nonetheless managed to publish her work on the authorship question in The Review of English Studies (published by Oxford University Press) and The Elizabethan Review. Her book, Shakespeare's Unorthodox Biography: New Evidence of an Authorship Problem, was published by Greenwood Press in 2001, and is, according to Price, the first anti-Stratfordian work to be accepted in an academic series by a mainstream publisher. Price spoke with FRONTLINE's Wen Stephenson on Dec. 9, 2002.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
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