a grotesque *St.THOMAS*

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Arthur Neuendorffer

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Jul 23, 2021, 6:10:52 PMJul 23
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--------------------------------------------------------
Alan Green's cyan right triangle marked by
{(e-1), sqrt(3), G(dot)} : https://tinyurl.com/yydnzwbn
.
. is a 30º/60º/90º triangle with almost the orientation of the
. 30º/60º/90º triangle pointing to the Westminster burial site.
.
. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Rv9J7OWWYA
. https://vimeo.com/181710012
...............................................................
. https://tinyurl.com/yydnzwbn

If Shaksper's merry drinking buddies: Drayton & Jonson are
substituted for: Chaucer & Spenser as the hypotenuse a smaller
self similar 30º/60º/90º triangle points to an end of the tiled
section where something else may be easily buried (Beaumont?).
The smaller triangle is reduced in size by a factor of
[1+sqrt(3)] ~ "e" : probably the exact length ratio of
Alan Green's adjacent "blue" right triangle designated "e"
. https://tinyurl.com/yydnzwbn
-------------------------------------------------­--------
http://tinyurl.com/yafpyqk

The KJV (1611) frontispiece: at the top center, is:
a grotesque *St.THOMAS* with a *CARPENTER's SQUARE* in *SHADOW*
-----------------------------------------------------------
One should note Doubting Thomas's attributes:

1) SPEAR (means of his Christian martyrdom),
2) (Masonic) carpenter's square (his profession, a builder)
-------------------------------------------------­--------
Top center of the 1611 KJV title page, http://tinyurl.com/yafpyqk
is a grotesque St.THOMAS with a CARPENTER's SQUARE in SHADOW
--------------------------------------------------------------
The KJV (1611) Epistle Dedicatory
http://www.hilltopbaptistnewport.net/images/DedicatoryCover.jpg
.......................................................
. TO THE MOST HIGH AND MIGHTIE
. (P)rince, (I)AMES by the grace of (G)od
. King of Great Britaine,{FRANC}e, and Irela[n]d,
. Defender [o]f the Faith, &[c].
. THE TRANSL[A]TORS OF THE [B]IBLE,
. wish Grace, Mercie, and Peace, through IESVS
. Christ our Lord.
............................................
*MASONic CARPENTER's SQUARE* :
.
. . . . <= 10 =>
.
. {F R A N C.} E A N D I
.. R E L A[N]. D,D E F E
.. N D E R[O]. F T H E F
.. A I T H[C]. T h e T r
.. a n s l[A]. t o r s o
.. f t h e[B]. i b l e w
.. i s h G r.. a c e,M e
.. r c i e,a.. n d P e a
.. c e,t h r.. o u g h I
.. E S V S C.. h r i s t
.. o u r L o.. r d.
.
[BACON] -10 : Prob. ~ 1 in 750
----------------------------------------------
________ [MASTER MASONS]
..............................................
. . . <= 3 x 7 =>
.
. (U) P o n t h e L i n e s a n d L i f e o f
. (T) H e F a m o u s S c e n i c k e P o e t
.
. [M A S T E R] W I L L I A M S H A K E S P E
. [A] R E T h o s e h a n d s w h i c h y o u
. [S] O c l a p t g o n o w a n d w r i n g Y
. [O] u B r i t a i n e s b r a v e f o r d o
. [N] e a r e S h a k e s p e a r e s d a y e
. [S]

[MASONS] 21 : Prob. at start of poem ~ 1 in 9460
......................................................
. "UT ALIIS, ME CONSUME"
....................................
<<The (U)nfortunate (T)raveller (1594) by Thomas Nashe
is a picaresque novel about Jack Wilton's adventures
through the European continent in which he finds himself
swept up in the currents of 16th-century history.>>
-----------------------------------------------------
1851 MOBY DICK; OR THE WHALE by Herman Melville
. Chapter vi - THE STREET
.
No town-bred *DANDY WILL* compare with a COUNTRY-bred one - I mean
a downright *BUMPKIN DANDY* - a fellow that, in the dog-days, WILL
mow his two acres in BUCKSKIN GLOVES for fear of TANNING his hands.
Now when a *COUNTRY DANDY* like this takes it into his head to
make *a distinguished reputation* , and joins the great whale-fishery,
you should see the comical things he does upon reaching the seaport.
In bespeaking his sea-outfit, he orders bell-buttons to his waistcoats;
straps to his canvas trowsers. Ah, poor Hay-Seed! how bitterly
will burst those straps in the first howling gale, when thou art
driven, straps, buttons, and all, down the throat of *THE TEMPEST* .
.
But think not that this famous town has only harpooneers,
cannibals, and *BUMPKINS* to show her visitors. Not at all.
. Still New Bedford is a QUEER place.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
[CARPENTER (resuming work).
Well, well, well! Stubb knows him best of all, and Stubb always says
he's QUEER; says nothing but that one sufficient little word QUEER;
he's QUEER, says Stubb; he's QUEER- QUEER, QUEER; and keeps
dinning it into Mr. Starbuck all the time- QUEER- sir- QUEER,
QUEER, VERY QUEER. And HERE's his leg.>>
.
<<[the CARPENTER] forthwith with all the indifferent
promptitude of his character, proceeded into the forecastle
and took Queequeg's measure with great accuracy, regularly
chalking Queequeg's person as he shifted *the RULE*
.
. "Ah! POOR FELLOW! he'll have to die now,"
. ejaculated the Long Island sailor.
.
. Going to his vice-bench, the CARPENTER for
. convenience sake and general reference,
.
. now *TRANSFERRINGLY MEASURED ON*

it the exact length the coffin was to be, and then made the
transfer permanent by cutting two notches at its extremities.>>
----------------------------------------------------------
_ *trans(F)err(I)ngl(Y) mea(SU)red on* - _Moby Dick_
.
___ t .r. a n
___ s (F) e r
___ r (I) n g
___ l (Y) m e
___ a (S) U r
___ e .d. o n
.
___________ . . . . . . . . . . [S]
. r o g e r m a n n e r s, e. r [U] t l a n d
___________ . . . . . . . . . . [F]
___________ . . . . . . . . . . [I]
___________ . . . . . . . . . . [Y]
.
. *SUFIY* - *WISE, PIOUS*
----------------------------------------------------------------
______ Hamlet (Quarto 1, 1603)
.
enter Clowne and an other.
.
Clowne: I say no, she ought not to be buried
. In christian buriall.
.
2: Why sir?
.
Clowne: Mary more's the pitty, that great folke
. Should haue more authoritie to hang or drowne
. Themselues, more than other people:
. Goe fetch me a stope of drinke, but before thou
. Goest, tell me one thing, who buildes strongest,
. Of a [MASON], a Shipwright, or a CARPENTER?
.
2: Why a [MASON], for he buildes all of stone,
. And will indure long.
.
Clowne: That's prety, too't agen, too't agen.
.
2: Why then a Carpenter, for he buildes the gallowes,
. And that brings many a one to his long home.
.
Clowne: Prety agen, the gallowes doth well, mary howe dooes it well?
. the gallowes dooes well to them that doe ill, goe
. ge[T] thee go[N]e: And if [A]ny one a[S]ke thee [H]ereaft[E]r,
. say, A Graue-maker, for the houses he buildes
. Last till Doomes-day. Fetch me a stope of beere, goe.
.............................................
. . <= 7 =>
.
. g e [T] t h e e
. g o [N] e A n d
. i f [A] n y o n
. e a [S] k e t h
. e e [H] e r e a
. f t [E] r
.
[TNASHE] 7
-------------------------------------------------
ISAIAH 44:13 *The CARPENTER stretcheth out his RULE* ; he marketh
. it out with a line; he fitteth it with planes, and he marketh it
. out with *the COMPASS* , and maketh it after the figure of a man,
according to the beauty of a man; that it may remain in the house.
. He HEWeth him down cedars, and taketh the CYPRESS and the oak,
----------------------------------------------------------------
"The village CARPENTER . . . lays out his work by
EMPIRICAL rules learnt in his apprenticeship." --H. SPENCER.
---------------------------------------------------------
Claudius reads Hamlet's letter to Laertes:
. (Act 4, Scene 7) [ 1604 Quarto 2 ]
.
'High and mighty, you shall know I am set naked on your
kingdom, to morrow shall I begge leaue to see your kingly
eyes, when I shal first asking you pardon, there-vnto
recount the occasion of my suddaine returne.'
........................................................
*Roger Manners* dies in 1612...and Shakspere & Burbage
make an impresa for the 6th Earl of Rutland in 1613.
........................................................
Claudius reads Hamlet's letter to Laertes:
. (Act 4, Scene 7) [ 1623 Folio ]
.
'High and Mighty, you shall know I am set naked on your
Kingdome. To morrow shall I begge leaue to see your Kingly
Eyes. When I shall (first asking your Pardon thereunto)
recount th'Occasions of my sodaine,
.
. *AND MORE STRANGE RETURN.' 'HAMLET.'*
--------------------------------------------------------
The new added phrase *AND MORE STRANGE RETURN.*
is a near anagram for *roger manners, e. rutland*
.
And with *hamlet* it can be rearranged to form a *sword* :
----------------------------------------------------------
. << *and more strange return. hamlet* >>
.
___________ . . . . . . . . . . . . [H]
___________ . . . . . . . . . . . . [A]
___________ . . . . . . . . . . . . [M]
. r o g e r m a n n e r s, e. r u t [L] a n d
___________ . . . . . . . . . . . . [E]
___________ . . . . . . . . . . . . [T]
___________ . . . . . . . . . . . . [T]
---------------------------------------------------------------
. _MOBY DICK_ CHAPTER 107 "The CARPENTER"
.
<<You might almost say, that this STRANGE uncompromisedness
in him involved *a sort of unintelligence* ; for in his
numerous trades, he did not seem to work so much by reason
or by instinct, or simply because *he had been TUTORed to it*
, or by any intermixture of all these, even or UNEVEN;
but merely by kind of DEAF & DUMB, spontaneous literal process.
.
He was a pure manipulater; his BRAIN,
if he had EVER had one, must have early oozed
along into the muscles of his fingers. He was like
one of those unreasoning but still highly useful,
.
. *MULTUM IN PARVO* ,
.
Sheffield contrivances, assuming the exterior-
though a little swelled- of a common pocket knife;
but containing, not only blades of various sizes,
but also screw-drivers, cork-screws, tweezers,
awls, pens, rulers, nail-filers, countersinkers.>>
........................................................
*roger manners, e. rutland*, motto is *MULTUM IN PARVO*
___________________________________ *Much in Little*
--------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melencolia_I

Melencolia I is a large 1514 engraving by the German Renaissance artist Albrecht Dürer. The print's central subject is an enigmatic and gloomy winged female figure thought to be a personification of melancholia - melancholy. Holding her head in her hand, she stares past the busy scene in front of her. The area is strewn with symbols and tools associated with craft and carpentry, including an hourglass, weighing scales, a hand plane, a claw hammer, and a saw. Other objects relate to alchemy, geometry or numerology. Behind the figure is a structure with an embedded magic square, and a ladder leading beyond the frame. The sky contains a rainbow, a comet or planet, and a bat-like creature bearing the text that has become the print's title.
--------------------------------------------


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HlZhPuDYqbU

Everybodysgotonestickitupyourjump E R E V E rybodysgotoneumpaumpa
Everybodysgotonestickitupyourjump E R E V E rybodysgotoneumpaumpa
Everybodysgotonestickitupyourjump E R E V E rybodysgotoneumpaumpa
Everybodysgotonestickitupyourjump E R E V E rybodysgotoneumpaumpa
Everybodysgotonestickitupyourjump E R E V E rybodysgotoneumpaumpa

Slave
Thou hast slain me
Villain, take my purse
If I ever
Bury my body
The letters which though find'st about me
To Edmund Earl of Gloucester
Seek him out upon the British Party
O untimely death
I know thee well
A serviceable villain, as duteous to the vices of thy mistress
As badness would desire
What, is is he dead?
Sit you down, Father, rest you

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_Am_the_Walrus

"I Am the Walrus" is a song by the English rock band the Beatles from their 1967 television film Magical Mystery Tour. In the film, the song underscores a segment in which the band mime to the recording at a deserted airfield. Lennon wrote the song to confound listeners who had been affording serious scholarly interpretations of the Beatles' lyrics. The walrus refers to Lewis Carroll's poem "The Walrus and the Carpenter" (from the book Through the Looking-Glass). Lennon later expressed dismay upon belatedly realising that the walrus was a villain in the poem.
------------------------------------------------------------------
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HlZhPuDYqbU
..................................................................
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . <= 59 =>
.
Everybodysgotonestickitupyourjump E R E V E rybodysgotoneumpaumpa
Everybodysgotonestickitupyourjump E R E V E rybodysgotoneumpaumpa
Everybodysgotonestickitupyourjump E R E V E rybodysgotoneumpaumpa
Everybodysgotonestickitupyourjump E R E V E rybodysgotoneumpaumpa
Everybodysgotonestickitupyourjump E R E V E rybodysgotoneumpaumpa

E.VERE : 58,-60,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1

Slave
Thou hast slain me
Villain, take my purse
If I ever
Bury my body
The letters which though find'st about me
To Edmund Earl of Gloucester
Seek him out upon the British Party
O untimely death
I know thee well
A serviceable villain, as duteous to the vices of thy mistress
As badness would desire
What, is is he dead?
Sit you down, Father, rest you
------------------------------------------------------------------
The dramatic reading in the mix is Shakespeare's King Lear (Act IV, Scene 6), lines 219–222 and 249–262.It was added to the song on 29 September 1967, recorded directly from an AM radio Lennon was fiddling with. Lennon tuned around the dial and settled on the 7:30 pm to 11 pm broadcast of the play on the BBC Third Programme.

The first excerpt (ll. 219–222) moves in and out of the text, containing fragments of lines only. It begins where the disguised Edgar talks to his estranged and maliciously blinded father the Earl of Gloucester (timings given):

Gloucester: (2:35) Now, good sir, wh— (Lennon appears to change the channel away from the station here)

Edgar: (2:38) — poor man, made tame by fortune — (2:44) good pity —

In the play Edgar then kills Oswald, Goneril's steward. During the fade of the song the second main extract (ll. 249–262), this time of continuous text, is heard (timings given[17]):[17][21]

Oswald: (3:52) Slave, thou hast slain me. Villain, take my purse.
If ever thou wilt thrive, (4:02) bury my body,
And give the (4:05) letters which thou find'st about me
To (4:08) Edmund, Earl of Gloucester; (4:10) seek him out
Upon the British party. O, (4:14) untimely Death!

Edgar: (4:23) I know thee well: a (4:25) serviceable villain;
As duteous to the (4:27) vices of thy mistress
As badness would desire.

Gloucester: What, is he dead?

Edgar: (4:31) Sit you down father, rest you.
-----------------------------------------------------
The final piece of the song came together during a visit from Pete Shotton, Lennon's friend and former fellow member of the Quarrymen, when Lennon asked him about a playground nursery rhyme they sang as children. Shotton recalled the rhyme as follows:
.....................................................
. Yellow matter custard, *GREEN* slop <PIE>,
. All mixed together with a dead dog's eye,
. Slap it on a butty, ten-foot thick,
. Then wash it all down with a cup of cold sick.
.
Lennon borrowed a couple of images from the first two lines. Shotton was also responsible for suggesting that Lennon change the lyric "waiting for the man to come" to "waiting for the van to come". The Beatles' official biographer, Hunter Davies, was present while the song was being written and wrote an account in his 1968 book The Beatles. According to this biography, Lennon remarked to Shotton, "Let the fuckers work that one out." While the band were studying Transcendental Meditation in India in early 1968, George Harrison told journalist Lewis Lapham that one of the lines in "I Am the Walrus" incorporated the personal mantra he had received from their meditation teacher, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. According to Pattie Boyd, Harrison's wife at the time, the words "semolina pilchard" refer to Sergeant Pilcher of the London Drug Squad, who waged a campaign against British rock stars and underground figures during the late 1960s.
.
Lennon claimed he wrote the first two lines on separate acid trips; he explained much of the song to Playboy in 1980: The first line was written on one acid trip one weekend. The second line was written on the next acid trip the next weekend, and it was filled in after I met Yoko ... I'd seen Allen Ginsberg and some other people who liked Dylan and Jesus going on about Hare Krishna. It was Ginsberg, in particular, I was referring to. The words 'Element'ry penguin' meant that it's naïve to just go around chanting Hare Krishna or putting all your faith in one idol. In those days I was writing obscurely, à la Dylan. [...] It never dawned on me that Lewis Carroll was commenting on the capitalist system. I never went into that bit about what he really meant, like people are doing with the Beatles' work. Later, I went back and looked at it and realized that the walrus was the bad guy in the story and the carpenter was the good guy. I thought, Oh, shit, I picked the wrong guy. I should have said, 'I am the carpenter.' But that wouldn't have been the same, would it? [Sings, laughing] 'I am the carpenter ...'>>
--------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer

Donald Cameron

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