Roman Trade with China - the Silk Road

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J. D. "Tito" Sanchez

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Jan 14, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/14/00
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Dear all the usual readers of this NG,

This unworthy person is now beginning the literature review for his
dissertation. For the sake of everyone's sanity I will not go through
my entire thesis here, but basically give you a thumbnail. I am looking
for hard evidence of the economics of the Silk Road during the Han
through Tang Dynasties, which roughly runs from 200 BC - 900 AD. In
that period, I will focus more strictly on 100 BC - 700 AD, and I would
like most of all to find any evidence of Roman trade with China. Much
of my thesis will be taken up with translations of woodslips from
Dunhuang which have to do with translation, and also with numismatic
finds.

I would like to know if anyone can please suggests texts for me to look
at. The best studies I have found on the Rome-China connection have
been by F. Hirth, a German scholar who taught at Columbia around turn of
the 20th century, and by F. Teggart, who taught at California in the 30s
and 40s. His book was reprinted in the late 60s but essentially was the
same as the 1938 version. Both of these studies, thus are more than 60
years old; the Hirth book was written in 1898!

Please don't tell me to read the Homer Dubs book; it is very poorly
research and is not considered to be quality academia; nor is the work
of Manfred Raschke, which does boast an excellent bibliography but was
not scholarly so much as it was point-scoring. I have heard there is a
good book by Casson on the China trade topic, but have been unable to
locate it.

I'm also trying to run down a Mr Yang Hsienyi, who has apparently an
unpublished manuscript that has been of great use to several scholars.
Mr Yang, if you are out there, I would great appreciate an e-mail.

Thanks in advance to any advice I can get!

Kind regards,
Tito.
--
J. Tito Sanchez
Member of the Archaeological Institute of America
M.A. Candidate, Sinology / Chinese Studies
Graduate School
School of Oriental and African Studies
The University of London
--------
"At the end of the day, it's not the end of the world."

Jeremy M. Kridel

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Jan 14, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/14/00
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"J. D. \"Tito\" Sanchez" wrote:
>
> Dear all the usual readers of this NG,
>
> This unworthy person is now beginning the literature review for his
> dissertation. For the sake of everyone's sanity I will not go through
> my entire thesis here, but basically give you a thumbnail. I am looking
> for hard evidence of the economics of the Silk Road during the Han
> through Tang Dynasties, which roughly runs from 200 BC - 900 AD. In
> that period, I will focus more strictly on 100 BC - 700 AD, and I would
> like most of all to find any evidence of Roman trade with China. Much
> of my thesis will be taken up with translations of woodslips from
> Dunhuang which have to do with translation, and also with numismatic
> finds.

I don't know of how much use this will be, but I'll give it a shot.

As I was leaving my M.A. program, my department hired as visiting
assistant professor an A.B.D. from University of Washington's South
Asian Studies department who was focusing on the interaction and
transmission of different religious ideas along the Silk Road. I don't
know the periods in which he operates--in fact, I've only met him once
or twice, and I remember him as rather a shy fellow--but he may be able
to point you in fruitful directions.

His name is Jason Neelis, and he teaches in the Department of Religion
at Florida State University in Tallahassee, FL. Point your browser to
www.fsu.edu; you should be able to find his name in the e-mail directories.

If you can't find his information, drop me a line and I'll see if I can
get ir for you, if you need it.

Jeremy M. Kridel, M.A.
Department of Religious Studies
Indiana University, Bloomington
jkr...@indiana.edu

J. D. "Tito" Sanchez

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Jan 14, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/14/00
to
"Jeremy M. Kridel" wrote:

As I was leaving my M.A. program, my department hired as visiting

> assistant professor an A.B.D. from University of Washington's South
> Asian Studies department who was focusing on the interaction and
> transmission of different religious ideas along the Silk Road. I don't
> know the periods in which he operates--in fact, I've only met him once
> or twice, and I remember him as rather a shy fellow--but he may be able
> to point you in fruitful directions.
>
> His name is Jason Neelis, and he teaches in the Department of Religion
> at Florida State University in Tallahassee, FL. Point your browser to
> www.fsu.edu; you should be able to find his name in the e-mail directories.
>
> If you can't find his information, drop me a line and I'll see if I can
> get ir for you, if you need it.
>
> Jeremy M. Kridel, M.A.
> Department of Religious Studies
> Indiana University, Bloomington
> jkr...@indiana.edu

Thanks I'll look for him.

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