Rather Odd...

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Jeff Slenker

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Nov 4, 2021, 8:58:47 PM11/4/21
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I recently saw an advertisement for native English speakers for JPN to
ENG work. The advertisement included "Please specify whether you are
willing to act as a reviewer (including target-only reviewer)". Has
anyone ever seen a job add asking you about acting as a "target-only
reviewer"? That just seems an odd thing to ask professional
translators. I would get it if it were an advertisement to some
English majors at a university...

--
Jeff Slenker
J>E
Huntsville, AL USA
My web page is here (click on triple horizontal bars in upper-left corner
for more pages) <http://slenker-translation.jimdo.com/>

Matthew Schlecht

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Nov 4, 2021, 9:48:42 PM11/4/21
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On Thu, Nov 4, 2021 at 8:58 PM Jeff Slenker <jeffs...@gmail.com> wrote:
I recently saw an advertisement for native English speakers for JPN to
ENG work. The advertisement included "Please specify whether you are
willing to act as a reviewer (including target-only reviewer)". Has
anyone ever seen a job add asking you about acting as a "target-only
reviewer"? That just seems an odd thing to ask professional
translators. I would get it if it were an advertisement to some
English majors at a university...

It's called a "linguistic review" or a "monolingual review", or sometimes a "native review".
It's not paid as well as source vs. target review; put otherwise, a higher throughput (words per hour) is expected.
It includes things like running a spellcheck, fixing grammar, syntax, punctuation, etc., getting the articles right, so you're correct - it sounds like something an English major could do.
However, agencies like to place this sort of work with someone who has some knowledge of the source language in case that person is motivated to contribute some bilingual review effort. That comes up when the target is a word salad that cannot be deconvoluted without some knowledge of the source. That kind of thing should have been sorted out during the bilingual review, but...
I believe that this type of final review is mandated under some ISO guidelines for commercial translation.

Matthew Schlecht, PhD
Word Alchemy Translation, Inc.
Newark, DE, USA
wordalchemytranslation.com

John Stroman

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Nov 5, 2021, 6:27:08 AM11/5/21
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I agree with Matthew. I might add that this might be the agency's attempt at what used to be called "copy editing" at publishing companies and involves looking over the document for grammar, punctuation, and style errors rather than content. I have been asked to do this before by Japanese agencies for medical documents intended for publication that were written in English by a Japanese medical specialist (MD, PhD, etc.). I have generally refused because the pay is low and I graded enough student papers while teaching in Japan to last a lifetime. As Matthew points out, it is easy for someone with knowledge bpth in the technical field and the source language to catch sentences that make no sense to a native English speaking reader. I also suspect that this may be some criterion imposed on LSPs by either ISO or EU regulations. I've read that the EU has been mulling over the use of post-edited MT output in place of human translation for governmental documents at some levels. If you decide to take this up, you may get a lot of work, but be sure to charge by the hour rather than the word.
John Stroman 
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JimBreen

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Nov 5, 2021, 6:06:53 PM11/5/21
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John Stroman wrote:
I've read that the EU has been mulling over the use of post-edited MT output in place of human translation for governmental documents at some levels.

In fact the EU has been doing just that for years. Source documents typically start off in "controlled English" and go through an MT/post-edit into the 24 languages.

To quote form the strategic plan of the Directorate-General for Translation at : https://ec.europa.eu/info/sites/default/files/strategic_plan_dgt_2020-2024_en.pdf
"DGT will expand and develop its provision of eTranslation, its neural machine translation
service, to meet the growing demand for machine translation in the Commission’s
departments, not only for internal use, but also to ensure multilingual communication on
websites and platforms to bridge the language gap."

  Interesting reading.

Jim
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