Electrochemistry -- Lithium ion batteries.

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Warren Smith

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Jul 14, 2021, 3:42:06 PMJul 14
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When a lithium ion battery is charging, the cathode *releases* lithium ions.

When the battery is discharging the cathode 吸蔵 lithium ions. -- accepts? receives? occludes? absorbs? stores?

 

Amazing how many English-language texts avoid using a word for what the cathode does...

 

Many dictionaries use the word "occlude," but when I ran this word past a chemical engineering professor friend of mine, he said he has never used this word in this context. I seem to recall being challenged by an attorney (in a deposition!) many years ago for using the "dictionary" definition "occlude," and here it is years later and I still don't have a better translation.

 

In find one reference that uses "intercalation" (and have a vague memory of using that term in the past). Does this word communicate?

 

Suggestions?

 

Thanks.

 

Dr. M. S. Niranjan

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Jul 14, 2021, 3:48:06 PMJul 14
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On 2021/07/15 1:11, Warren Smith wrote:

When a lithium ion battery is charging, the cathode *releases* lithium ions.

When the battery is discharging the cathode 吸蔵 lithium ions. -- accepts? receives? occludes? absorbs? stores?

I would just use 'accumulates'

Niranjan
(Dr. M. S. Niranjan)

Matthew Schlecht

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Jul 14, 2021, 3:59:47 PMJul 14
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On Wed, Jul 14, 2021 at 3:42 PM Warren Smith <Warren...@comcast.net> wrote:

When a lithium ion battery is charging, the cathode *releases* lithium ions.

When the battery is discharging the cathode 吸蔵 lithium ions. -- accepts? receives? occludes? absorbs? stores?


Assuming that this is patent related, a quick survey of the first page (of 293 pages!) of hits at the WIPO patent database for "吸蔵" and "lithium" shows "occludes", "absorbs", "stores"

Matthew Schlecht, PhD
Word Alchemy Translation, Inc.
Newark, DE, USA
wordalchemytranslation.com

Warren Smith

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Jul 14, 2021, 4:51:05 PMJul 14
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Thanks.

 

I wonder if there is a way to sort these into documents that were originally written in English and then translated to Japanese (where the 吸蔵is the translated term). That is, I don't trust the other translators (except for people like Dr. Schlect and Dr. N!).

 

I will poke around and look for documents originally in English and see what they say (and report back). Thanks for suggesting it.

 

Warren

 


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Warren Smith

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Jul 14, 2021, 5:16:37 PMJul 14
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Finding relevant US patents relating to this technology that were NOT originally in Japanese, Korean, or Chinese is somewhat difficult. I guess there aren't very many players in the US in lithium batteries.

 

One by Du Pont, available only in English uses "insertion" and "deinsertion" of Li ion into/out of the cathode: "The term "lithium-ion cell" refers to a lithium battery having both anode and cathode comprising active electrode materials whose charge storage and release mechanism involves the insertion and deinsertion of Li ions."

 

Another one, from the University of Utah, also uses "insertion": "Much research on cathode materials for rechargeable Li-ion batteries has involved lithium insertion compounds with layered, spinel, or olivine structure."

 

 

I never would have thought of "insertion," but this seems like the term used by PSITA (persons skilled in the art) in the US: https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-94-010-0389-6_11

 

----------

On a side note, I was kind of surprised to find that "secondary battery" is commonly used in English. I have always used "rechargeable battery," and assumed that "secondary battery" was chokuyaku from Japanese.

 

W

 

 

 

 

 


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li...@letstalktranslations.com

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Jul 14, 2021, 8:52:19 PMJul 14
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> I was kind of surprised to find that "secondary battery" is commonly used in English. I have always used "rechargeable battery," and assumed that "secondary battery" was chokuyaku from Japanese.

 

I am always careful to only use “secondary battery” when the audience is expected to know the term. (In your line of work, that might be all the time.) Your average punter would not understand it to mean “rechargeable battery” (thinking it refers to a “second” battery only).

 

Michael Hendry, in Newcastle Australia

Dr. M. S. Niranjan

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Jul 15, 2021, 12:16:03 AMJul 15
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On 2021/07/15 2:46, Warren Smith wrote:
On a side note, I was kind of surprised to find that "secondary battery" is commonly used in English. I have always used "rechargeable battery," and assumed that "secondary battery" was chokuyaku from Japanese.
That is surprising because when I first studied batteries (in high school or undergraduate days, I do not remember) about 55 years ago, the textbook clearly mentioned that the Volta cell is a primary battery and the lead-acid cell is a secondary battery. The term "rechargeable batteries" was not in common use, I think. Examples given for the two being the usual torchlight (manganese batteries) being primary cells and car batteries being secondary batteries.
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