There are good people left in the world!

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HRM Resident

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Aug 12, 2022, 1:09:07 PMAug 12
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Today, I had to drop off a small packet/large envelope
at the post office. This is a small PO with just one clerk.
There was this 50ish unmasked fellow ahead of me. He looked
like the antivaxxer type. He turned around and looked at
me wearing my KN99 mask, and I figured, "Here it comes!"

Instead, he smiled and said, "I'm getting an address
changed and a few other things. This is going to take a
while. Give me that, and I'll send it for you when I'm
finished." "But," I replied, "It's oversized and will
likely cost a few dollars." He said, "No problem. I'll
pay for it." I tried to say that's unnecessary, but he
insisted, tossed it in with the rest of his mail and
told the clerk, "Put that in with my other stuff."

He made my day! It goes to show you can't judge a
book by its cover.

--
HRM Resident

James Warren

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Aug 12, 2022, 1:12:42 PMAug 12
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Put a fancy cover on a bible and it's still trash. :)

HRM Resident

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Aug 12, 2022, 2:58:50 PMAug 12
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On 2022-08-12 2:12 p.m., James Warren wrote:

>
> Put a fancy cover on a bible and it's still trash. :)
>

I got the impression he felt a bit guilty for tying
up the clerk, and decided to do me a favour. I said he
looked like an antivaxxer. I was standing 6-7 feet back
waiting my turn. Not all unmasked 50-60 year olds are
dorks. The government says we don't have to wear them.
Maybe the guy had 4 needles. I didn't ask him! :-)

I suppose he might have retrieved my packet after
I left and tossed it! I'll know next week if the
intended recipient gets it. Although said recipient
isn't very bright.

--
HRM Resident

James Warren

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Aug 12, 2022, 4:52:02 PMAug 12
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On 2022-08-12 3:58 PM, HRM Resident wrote:
> On 2022-08-12 2:12 p.m., James Warren wrote:
>
>>
>> Put a fancy cover on a bible and it's still trash. :)
>>
>
>     I got the impression he felt a bit guilty for tying
> up the clerk, and decided to do me a favour.  I said he
> looked like an antivaxxer.  I was standing 6-7 feet back
> waiting my turn. Not all unmasked 50-60 year olds are
> dorks. The government says we don't have to wear them.
> Maybe the guy had 4 needles. I didn't ask him! :-)

He was probably a good guy.

axemen99

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Aug 12, 2022, 5:10:57 PMAug 12
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Nova Scotian kindness.
Many years ago, I was able to hitchhike from Gaspereau along 101 to Halifax around 11 pm Friday night.

Unlike big cities, you can still run into a lot of good people in NS, even in Maine. You can see several kind people in this video by a couple who drove from Bar Harbor ME to Yarmouth NS, using the CAT ferry, last week.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5HT0_NP05R8

HRM Resident

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Aug 12, 2022, 7:57:53 PMAug 12
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axemen99 <axem...@gmail.com> wrote:

>
> Nova Scotian kindness.
> Many years ago, I was able to hitchhike from Gaspereau along 101 to
> Halifax around 11 pm Friday night.
>
> Unlike big cities, you can still run into a lot of good people in NS,
> even in Maine. You can see several kind people in this video by a couple
> who drove from Bar Harbor ME to Yarmouth NS, using the CAT ferry, last week.
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5HT0_NP05R8
>

Looks good, axmen99! Yes, there are still many kind
people in Nova Scotia and worldwide.

The difficulty is picking them out. Hitchhiking is pretty much a thing of
the past. When I was growing up in the 60s,it was common here in NS. And
probably all
across North America. Sometime between 1980 and
2000, it disappeared completely. I think both hitchhikers
and drivers became scared, and for a good reason.

There are too many creeps around. You might pick
up 1000 good people, but one bad actor spoils it
for everyone. And predators are driving around
who would do great harm to hitchhikers. So that mode
of transportation has disappeared.

FWIW, I made 40 trips between Sydney in Cape
Breton to Halifax in 1971-1972. Half of them were
hitchhiking. I never had a problem. Today, a 19-20
year old wouldn’t dare try that. It’s a different world,
and I don’t know why.

--
HRM Resident

lucretia

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Aug 13, 2022, 7:37:57 AMAug 13
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Yes, you're right, my BIL was here from the UK a few weeks ago and
when I took him down to the harbour, he was busy taking pics and I
would usually talk to people fishing etc while he did. When we had
lunch he remarked to me that if I had been doing that in the UK these
days, I would probably get punched out. BTW we ate at the Bicycle
Thief and the food is great and the servers extremely nice as well.

axemen99

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Aug 13, 2022, 12:23:49 PMAug 13
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On Saturday, August 13, 2022 at 7:37:57 AM UTC-4, lucretia wrote:
Another thought...
In NS, people would stay home and isolate if they suspect that they have COVID, voluntarily. The PO guy in question must have all covid shots and feel healthy, and would not pass any covid germs. Life is back to normal in NS, with masks optional for caution.

A recent case in HK, a son who had COVID with the Rapid test, he did not report and asked help. He stayed home with his 97 years old father who had heart problem and diabetic. His father picked up COVID after 5 days later, then passed away in 10 days in hospital. Care for your relatives and friends is important.

lucretia

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Aug 13, 2022, 1:16:31 PMAug 13
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Yes, I still wear my mask in big stores like Sobeys, not so much for
me but for other people in case I am getting it but don't know it.

HRM Resident

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Aug 13, 2022, 1:27:50 PMAug 13
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I think you are more or less correct. However, since posting
yesterday, I have had time to think about "what changed in Nova
Scotia." (In the hitching discussion.)

I think the population "explosion" in the past, combined with
the Internet, are factors. People don't "know" one another as
much here as they did in past decades. This sense of independence
and "I'm looking out for myself" seems to be creeping in. This
isn't Toronto or NYC, but we don't know our neighbours and
fellow province residents like we used to. I note a sense that
it's everyone for themselves in many instances. It's not everyone
or everywhere in the province, but people are becoming more
independent and mistrustful of others.

Sort of related, today I was talking to my neighbours, who are in
their mid-30s. They told me that in the past couple of months, they
both had Covid. He was laid up in bed for several days, and she
said her case was much like a bad cold. So they isolated and have
ageing parents they stayed away from until they had a couple of
negative tests. Both are university educated and follow the
science.

He told me that he's bee monitoring a site that is keeping track
of the wastewater in Canada:

<https://health-infobase.canada.ca/covid-19/wastewater/>

Specifically, have a look at Halifax . . . there are three
locations they monitor, and all are showing an uptick in August.
So one can conclude that it's widespread here, with wastewater
being our only metric. The rest of the information is from news
reports of hospitals being overloaded, health care workers
burning out, etc. It's like pulling teeth to find out how bad
it is since we've apparently been told we must live with it.

In light of this vacuum of official information, I am still
in hibernation mode and I intend to wear my mask when I need
to go out in public, social distance when possible, etc. We may
have to live with it, but the key word for me is LIVE. I don't
want to end up in the hospital on a respirator.

--
HRM Resident

James Warren

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Aug 13, 2022, 5:56:48 PMAug 13
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That's exactly what we do too.

lucretia

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Aug 13, 2022, 8:44:28 PMAug 13
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I do notice though that mask wearing is becoming less all the time.
Apparently Dal has rethought their procedure and students are to wear
masks in class this coming year.

axemen99

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Aug 13, 2022, 10:05:50 PMAug 13
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On Saturday, August 13, 2022 at 8:44:28 PM UTC-4, lucretia wrote:
> I do notice though that mask wearing is becoming less all the time.
> Apparently Dal has rethought their procedure and students are to wear
> masks in class this coming year.

It was announced Wednesday - "Masks will be required in all indoor classrooms and instructional spaces", other locations are optional.
https://www.dal.ca/covid-19-information-and-updates/updates/2022/08/11/covid_19_procedures_protocols_fall_2022.html

In large cities, people tend to be careless about covid. Dalhouse would be bad if large population of students and staff pick up covid. Classes would be cancelled.

Acadia announced earlier that masks are required if the professor requires it. So far, Acadia managed covid better than StFX.

James Warren

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Aug 13, 2022, 10:37:17 PMAug 13
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Yes, my wife who goes out almost daily says the same thing. Masks
are becoming less and less common. It would be disappointing if
Dal went mask free. It is an institution of learning.

HRM Resident

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Aug 14, 2022, 1:47:22 AMAug 14
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On 2022-08-13 11:37 p.m., James Warren wrote:

>>
>> I do notice though that mask wearing is becoming less all the time.
>> Apparently Dal has rethought their procedure and students are to wear
>> masks in class this coming year.
>
> Yes, my wife who goes out almost daily says the same thing. Masks
> are becoming less and less common. It would be disappointing if
> Dal went mask free. It is an institution of learning.

I noticed the same trend toward "no masking," and was
heartened to see on the news that Dalhousie is requiring them
this coming year. Maybe it'll set a precedent for the other
universities.

Given the uptick in the HRM wastewater already, we're bound
to see many more cases when schools and universities resume in September.

Being a hermit isn't that bad! I feel sorry for those who do not
have that option. It's one of the few "good" things about getting
old.

--
HRM Resident

James Warren

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Aug 14, 2022, 8:58:53 AMAug 14
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I always had hermit tendencies. Work and social necessity forced me
to interact with other people and be in crowds. I like people. I have
studied them since I was a kid. They are quite interesting but perhaps
not much longer for this planet. :)

HRM Resident

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Aug 14, 2022, 10:00:19 AMAug 14
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On 2022-08-14 9:58 a.m., James Warren wrote:

>
> I always had hermit tendencies. Work and social necessity forced me
> to interact with other people and be in crowds. I like people. I have
> studied them since I was a kid. They are quite interesting but perhaps
> not much longer for this planet. :)
>

Pretty much the same. I'm the classic "country mouse."
I worked in the city all my career. I was an open book at the
first job, as most country mice are. The city mice mocked
and made fun of my "hillbilly ways." These were the same
mice who got to work at 11 AM if we had 3-4 inches of snow.
We country mice got up at 4-5 AM, shovelled out the
driveway even if we had 1-2 feet of snow, and showed up
at 8 AM. Somehow work ethics like that and not going to
places like Neptune and the Rebecca Cohen, a couple of
times a month, made me a "hillbilly."

On job number two, they couldn't pry anything out of
me! Once burnt, twice shy! Fuck city mice or "townies"
as I call them!

--
HRM Resident

James Warren

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Aug 14, 2022, 10:42:51 AMAug 14
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I worked among people from all over the world. Being aware
of the many different ways that people can conceive of the
world and their many customs makes one more tolerant and
open minded. Sometimes other ways of seeing have merit.

HRM Resident

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Aug 14, 2022, 11:15:01 AMAug 14
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Me too, on a professional level. Been "all over the world"
and I have a great interest in different cultures, etc. I recall
standing in a park in Stockholm and it hit me, "The world doesn't
revolve around Ottawa or DC, as much as they want us to believe
it does."

I was referring to personal life. I don't need to know who
the co-worker is fucking on the side, how many kids they have,
what they do for entertainment on weekends, what their favourite
hobby is, what their political or religious views are, etc. Of
course I am mildly interested if they offer any of this info,
but I would NEVER use it against them.

In my early years, while there was a bit of local "village
gossip," a person wasn't made fun of because they were different.
I had no reason to believe "townies" were any different. I learned
the hard way. It was subtle at first, but the more they found out
about me, the more I got first "pranked" and then openly made
fun of and set up to look like a fool. On my second job, they
knew the basic details necessary. They didn't even know my wife
or kid's names, except if absolutely necessary for HR details.
I was the boring guy in the cafeteria! I listened and didn't
talk very much other than about work.

From then on, I only shared personal information with people
I trusted. It takes me a long time to learn to trust someone.
When I figure out they are not going to stick me, I will be the
"open book" and these are people I call true friends.

--
HRM Resident

James Warren

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Aug 14, 2022, 11:41:24 AMAug 14
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I can relate to all that. I don't recall much pranking but I
did quickly "learn the ropes" of each new situation I found
myself in. Close friends were rare but many people did
open up to me though probably I looked harmless. :) People.
some who i didn't know well, would come into my office and
shut the door for a long personal discussion of their
problems or predicaments. I tried my best to be unbiased
and non-judgemental and discrete. I was trusted. Hopefully
i deserved their trust.

HRM Resident

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Aug 14, 2022, 1:12:37 PMAug 14
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On 2022-08-14 12:41 p.m., James Warren wrote:

>>
>>     From then on, I only shared personal information with people
>> I trusted.  It takes me a long time to learn to trust someone.
>> When I figure out they are not going to stick me, I will be the
>> "open book" and these are people I call true friends.
>>
>
> I can relate to all that. I don't recall much pranking but I
> did quickly "learn the ropes" of each new situation I found
> myself in. Close friends were rare but many people did
> open up to me though probably I looked harmless. :) People.
> some who i didn't know well, would come into my office and
> shut the door for a long personal discussion of their
> problems or predicaments. I tried my best to be unbiased
> and non-judgemental and discrete. I was trusted. Hopefully
> i deserved their trust.
>

I think you did. Otherwise word would get out and you
wouldn't get any more visitors with personal information.

Too bad we don't have a binary capability on this NG.
You could post a picture and we could see if you look
as harmless as you claim! :-) I have this mental image
of a 6-foot plus wrestler . . . if you ever watched any
of that foolishness in the 60s and 70s, I envision Killer
Karl Krup!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killer_Karl_Krupp

Close? :-)

Only once did I find myself in a situation where I was
given personal information that mattered. It was a mess,
but I stuck my neck out and tried (successfully I think)
to resolve it. It was serious enough, in my assessment, to
get involved.

But as discussed, once I was nut-kicked a few times, I
learned to be a recluse. Maybe we are more alike than it
appears from our mostly phoney bickering on USENET. After
all, this NG has diminished to just a few bored people.

--
HRM Resident

James Warren

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Aug 14, 2022, 2:06:06 PMAug 14
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Holy Fuck! I've been exposed after all these years. :)

>
>     Only once did I find myself in a situation where I was
> given personal information that mattered. It was a mess,
> but I stuck my neck out and tried (successfully I think)
> to resolve it. It was serious enough, in my assessment, to
> get involved.
>
>     But as discussed, once I was nut-kicked a few times, I
> learned to be a recluse. Maybe we are more alike than it
> appears from our mostly phoney bickering on USENET. After
> all, this NG has diminished to just a few bored people.
>

I never got beaten up even in the slums. I was harmless. :)


HRM Resident

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Aug 14, 2022, 3:53:18 PMAug 14
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On 2022-08-14 3:06 p.m., James Warren wrote:

>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killer_Karl_Krupp
>>
>>      Close? :-)
>
> Holy Fuck! I've been exposed after all these years. :)
>

Wow! In 1974-1975 I took a couple of old guys
(our age now who were wrestling nuts from watching it
on TV) to see you and Leo Burke duke it out for the
World Heavyweight Championship at the Halifax Forum.

The Cuban Assassin and Bobby Bass were there
too. We had front row centre seats . . . $5 each!

Seriously. It made the decade for those fellows.
They thought it was real and they got to see their
"hero" in real life. You even signed an autograph
for one of them. He almost fainted, like one of those
15-year-old girls going nuts over Elvis or The
Beatles.

Thanks for the memories, Karl! :-)

--
HRM Resident

James Warren

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Aug 14, 2022, 4:16:09 PMAug 14
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My pleasure. :)

lucretia

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Aug 14, 2022, 7:55:26 PMAug 14
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On Sun, 14 Aug 2022 16:53:15 -0300, HRM Resident <hrm...@gmail.com>
wrote:
I didn't love Elvis but it was handy to put on a record and drive my
mother mad! However I did like the Beatles and had a record on one
day when the milkman came, he was horrified and in a hushed voice
asked if I really liked them :)

HRM Resident

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Aug 14, 2022, 9:04:17 PMAug 14
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lucretia <lucreti...@fl.it> wrote:

>
> I didn't love Elvis but it was handy to put on a record and drive my
> mother mad! However I did like the Beatles and had a record on one
> day when the milkman came, he was horrified and in a hushed voice
> asked if I really liked them :)


Elvis never did anything for me either. Nor the
Beatles in their heyday. But in the 70s after they
broke up, I came to appreciate their music very
much. They were probably the best artists ever.
I still listen to them from time to time.

--
HRM Resident

HRM Resident

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Aug 15, 2022, 6:22:51 AMAug 15
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James Warren <jwwar...@gmail.com> wrote:

>>     But as discussed, once I was nut-kicked a few times, I
>> learned to be a recluse. Maybe we are more alike than it
>> appears from our mostly phoney bickering on USENET. After
>> all, this NG has diminished to just a few bored people.
>>
>
> I never got beaten up even in the slums. I was harmless. :)
>

Me either. I don’t remember ever being in a
physical fight or even a serious screaming match.
Maybe in grade school, tousling with other kids between
ages 5-10. Memories of that era have pretty much
faded.

I used the term “nut-kicked” metaphorically. I was
like you in some ways, I think. I was, and still am, a
runt. But I could smell trouble and avoided it when
I could or talked my way out of it. I knew some
6-foot plus brutes who were all muscle. They
could and did get into tavern brawls. But no
matter how tough they were, eventually, someone
tougher came along.

As I said, the nut-kicking was verbal or
psychological backstabbing. So after a few years, one learns not to give
them ammo. It sounds
like you also got a rude awakening to the realities
of life. Survival is not necessarily done by brute
force but by using one’s brains and avoiding the
unpleasant situations.

I still say, “Fuck Townies!” They are a different
breed and are too harsh and nasty for my liking! :-)

--
HRM Resident

James Warren

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Aug 15, 2022, 7:28:43 AMAug 15
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Yeah, brain over brawn.

>
> I still say, “Fuck Townies!” They are a different
> breed and are too harsh and nasty for my liking! :-)
>

I found "country folk" often to be paranoid types. Many
are arch conservatives. I once saw a whole road with
less than a dozen houses all with "REFORM" signs out
front.

HRM Resident

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Aug 15, 2022, 8:45:50 AMAug 15
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James Warren <jwwar...@gmail.com> wrote:

>
> I found "country folk" often to be paranoid types. Many
> are arch conservatives. I once saw a whole road with
> less than a dozen houses all with "REFORM" signs out
> front.
>

I never detected paranoia, but maybe in some
places where they rarely see people that they don’t
know.

The ultra right Reform and PPC types do tend to be
in the country. Usually “old stock farmers” and
equivalent. You just have to look at the seat breakdown
at the Federal and Provincial level to see this.

Commies like us tend to be urban. I am the
oddball pinko in the country, I suppose. Whatever
is going on, it’s getting more polarized to hard right
and hard left everywhere.

--
HRM Resident

James Warren

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Aug 15, 2022, 10:13:07 AMAug 15
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The divide has been describes as urban/rural, educated/uneducated,
elites/common folk. etc. It is all of these. Many country folk
don't want their kids to go to university because they come back
as know-it-alls or even worse, atheists.

HRM Resident

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Aug 15, 2022, 10:23:12 AMAug 15
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On 2022-08-15 11:12 a.m., James Warren wrote:

>
> The divide has been describes as urban/rural, educated/uneducated,
> elites/common folk. etc. It is all of these. Many country folk
> don't want their kids to go to university because they come back
> as know-it-alls or even worse, atheists.
>

I hadn't thought of it that way, but now that you
mention it, it makes sense. Growing up, I only knew
one person who went to university. He went full bore
and became a lawyer. I don't know if he became an
atheist. I haven't "seen" him since grade 6, although
I hear his name on the news now and then. I guess
he did well.

Since the 80s, many more get degrees. They don't come
back know-it-alls. They don't come back at all. They
find places in cities to live and turn into "townies."

A townie is 10 times worse than an atheist! Given
the way they are closing and selling churches left and
right everywhere, I suspect most of the rural people
are atheists, or agnostics. The money going to the
churches dried up.

--
HRM Resident

James Warren

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Aug 15, 2022, 11:07:02 AMAug 15
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On 2022-08-15 11:23 AM, HRM Resident wrote:
> On 2022-08-15 11:12 a.m., James Warren wrote:
>
>>
>> The divide has been describes as urban/rural, educated/uneducated,
>> elites/common folk. etc. It is all of these. Many country folk
>> don't want their kids to go to university because they come back
>> as know-it-alls or even worse, atheists.
>>
>
>     I hadn't thought of it that way, but now that you
> mention it, it makes sense.  Growing up, I only knew
> one person who went to university.  He went full bore
> and became a lawyer.  I don't know if he became an
> atheist.  I haven't "seen" him since grade 6, although
> I hear his name on the news now and then.  I guess
> he did well.
>
>    Since the 80s, many more get degrees.  They don't come
> back know-it-alls.  They don't come back at all.  They
> find places in cities to live and turn into "townies."

They can't make a living back home.

>
>    A townie is 10 times worse than an atheist!  Given
> the way they are closing and selling churches left and
> right everywhere, I suspect most of the rural people
> are atheists, or agnostics.  The money going to the
> churches dried up.
>

Who does home schooling? Rural folk and evangelicals.

I'm not sure I understand your definition of "townie"
or your perception of their attributes.

HRM Resident

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Aug 15, 2022, 12:58:51 PMAug 15
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On 2022-08-15 12:06 p.m., James Warren wrote:
> On 2022-08-15 11:23 AM, HRM Resident wrote:

>>
>
> Who does home schooling? Rural folk and evangelicals.
>

And people afraid of Covid.

BTW, what part of US do you live in.
People live here, and we visit our families.
You'all hang out with other folks and on
Thanksgiving Day you invite the folks to
dinner. :-)

We invite our families to supper and eat dinner at
noon. We don't "do lunch." A lunch is a sandwich and
an apple you put in a paper bag when you go for a walk
in the woods. :-)


> I'm not sure I understand your definition of "townie"
> or your perception of their attributes.
>

A townie is a snob who looks down
on rural people, usually making fun of
them. It's not necessarily someone who
lives in a city, but they are attracted
to cities to be with "the 'better' social
class." Follow? :-)

--
HRM Resident

James Warren

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Aug 15, 2022, 1:06:12 PMAug 15
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On 2022-08-15 1:58 PM, HRM Resident wrote:
> On 2022-08-15 12:06 p.m., James Warren wrote:
>> On 2022-08-15 11:23 AM, HRM Resident wrote:
>
>>>
>>
>> Who does home schooling? Rural folk and evangelicals.
>>
>
>     And people afraid of Covid.

And before COVID?

>
>     BTW, what part of US do you live in.
> People live here, and we visit our families.
> You'all hang out with other folks and on
> Thanksgiving Day you invite the folks to
> dinner. :-)

Never did that. :)

>
>     We invite our families to supper and eat dinner at
> noon.  We don't "do lunch."  A lunch is a sandwich and
> an apple you put in a paper bag when you go for a walk
> in the woods. :-)

Don't do that either. :)

>
>
>> I'm not sure I understand your definition of "townie"
>> or your perception of their attributes.
>>
>
>     A townie is a snob who looks down
> on rural people, usually making fun of
> them.  It's not necessarily someone who
> lives in a city, but they are attracted
> to cities to be with "the 'better' social
> class."  Follow? :-)
>

What if they're Trumpists?

I agree. Don't sneer at people just because they're
country folk. Many make good music. :)

HRM Resident

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Aug 15, 2022, 1:41:01 PMAug 15
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On 2022-08-15 2:06 p.m., James Warren wrote:

>>      And people afraid of Covid.
>
> And before COVID?
>

Rich people who could afford to
live on a single salary and don't
trust private schools. Usually, but
not restricted to, "Chester type"
Karens. Many also live in South End
Halifax and Rockliff (in Ottawa) areas
where there are no "riff-raff."

The crème de la crème live in
gated communities. :-)

>
> Never did that. :)
>

Then why do you talk like an
American? :-)


>
> Don't do that either. :)
>

Then why do you talk like an
American? :-)

>
> What if they're Trumpists?
>

Then they are gullible, stupid or evil. Or
all three.

> I agree. Don't sneer at people just because they're
> country folk. Many make good music. :)

Nothing like the old TV show "Hee Haw!" Or
nuts that watch Gunsmoke re-runs and think it was
better in 1882 living in Kansas. :-)

And like this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOFVrDAnrGc


--
HRM Resident

James Warren

unread,
Aug 15, 2022, 2:31:40 PMAug 15
to
On 2022-08-15 2:40 PM, HRM Resident wrote:
> On 2022-08-15 2:06 p.m., James Warren wrote:
>
>>>      And people afraid of Covid.
>>
>> And before COVID?
>>
>
>     Rich people who could afford to
> live on a single salary and don't
> trust private schools. Usually, but
> not restricted to, "Chester type"
> Karens.  Many also live in South End
> Halifax and Rockliff (in Ottawa) areas
> where there are no "riff-raff."

Can't be many of those.

>
>    The crème de la crème live in
> gated communities. :-)

Gotta be smart to avoid taxes. :)

>
>>
>> Never did that. :)
>>
>
>     Then why do you talk like an
> American? :-)
>

Eh?

>
>>
>> Don't do that either. :)
>>
>
>     Then why do you talk like an
> American? :-)

Eh?

>
>>
>> What if they're Trumpists?
>>
>
>     Then they are gullible, stupid or evil. Or
> all three.

Most likely.

>
>> I agree. Don't sneer at people just because they're
>> country folk. Many make good music. :)
>
>     Nothing like the old TV show "Hee Haw!" Or
> nuts that watch Gunsmoke re-runs and think it was
> better in 1882 living in Kansas. :-)

I think I know one! :)

>
>    And like this:
>
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOFVrDAnrGc
>
>

And this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e4Ao-iNPPUc


HRM Resident

unread,
Aug 15, 2022, 4:02:21 PMAug 15
to
On 2022-08-15 3:31 p.m., James Warren wrote:

>>
>>      Rich people who could afford to
>> live on a single salary and don't
>> trust private schools. Usually, but
>> not restricted to, "Chester type"
>> Karens.  Many also live in South End
>> Halifax and Rockliff (in Ottawa) areas
>> where there are no "riff-raff."
>
> Can't be many of those.
>

How do you know? Don't pigeon hole
all home schoolers as rual evangelists.
I would imagine it's time consuming and
expensive to do it. I don't know anyone
who ever was home schooled.

My guess is it has to be the rich
because they'd be the only ones who could
afford to do so.

>>     The crème de la crème live in
>> gated communities. :-)
>
> Gotta be smart to avoid taxes. :)
>

It seems unlikely that everyone
in gated communities pay their fair
share of taxes. I have no idea what
it costs to live in those mansions,
but I don't think even a highly paid
lawyer or doctor could make enough to
do so honestly. Where do they get it?
Insider trading and tax evasion come
to mind, but I don't know and have no
way of finding out. They sure as hell
ain't going to tell us!

>
> Eh?
>

You say folks and dinner (in the
evening) all the time. Those are US
dialect versions of the English language.
:-)

>
> Eh?
>

You say folks and dinner (in the
evening) all the time. Those are US
dialect versions of the English language.
:-)

Are you using a VPN and posting from
Florida or Texas? :-)


>>
>>> I agree. Don't sneer at people just because they're
>>> country folk. Many make good music. :)

Country FOLK? :-)

>
> I think I know one! :)
>

Not me. I watch those reruns, but things
anywhere in 1882 were not 1/10th as good as
today, and nothing good lives in Kansas! :-)

>
> And this:
>
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e4Ao-iNPPUc
>

Stevie Nicks singing Red River Valley is
far better than those ding-dong "right out of
Deliverance" playing AC/DC music! :-)

--
HRM Resident

Mike Spencer

unread,
Aug 15, 2022, 4:20:45 PMAug 15
to

James Warren <jwwar...@gmail.com> writes:

> I'm not sure I understand your definition of "townie"
> or your perception of their attributes.

Hats.

When I moved here over 50 years ago, all the country men wore hats.
Rarely fedoras -- different kinds of caps. Many working-class men who
lived in Bridgewater did, too, but not the typical middle class townie.

Where I lived before coming here, hats of all kinds had gone out of
fashion. Some older working men wore ball caps but a minority, But
as it happens, I wore a touque, a navy blue knit cap. In '67 I was
promoted from grease man to mechanic but there was no lift available
for me to use so I was assigned to the undercoat lift which was
splattered all over with tarry, black undercoat. Every night I had to
cut gobbets of undercoat out of my hair where I'd inadvertently bumped
my head against the lift.

So I started wearing a touque. When I left the VW dealership --
buncha crooks they were -- for a little 5-man foreign car shop, I
continues to wear the hat. By the time I moved here in '69, I was
accustomed to wearing it all the time. It was only after I'd been
here for awhile, that I realized that despite being a foreigner from
away, my hat was sort of a subtle stamp on my social passport
indicating that I wasn't totally alien.

There's a follow-on. A couple of years later, a friend moved here
with his wife. He put a lot of successful effort into homesteading
but discovered that, having abandoned his plan of grad school at Dal,
he needed some income stream and got a job at a fiberglass fabrication
biz. With two degrees from MIT, he was way overqualified to be the
plant engineer and was doing great in that role.

In technical aspects -- f'rgzample probably prevented the plant from
burning down by noticing where exothermic factors in resin curing were
being overlooked. But he reported to me over coffee that he wasn't
getting good reception from the workers whose methods and operations
he had to supervise. I told him to start wearing a hat. So he bought
a popullar style of cap at the Farmer'e Co-op and wore that. A month
later, his relations with the workforce in the plant were noticealy
improved. Converted perceived status from townie/suit/boss to
repected worker.

--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

James Warren

unread,
Aug 15, 2022, 4:38:21 PMAug 15
to
On 2022-08-15 5:02 PM, HRM Resident wrote:
> On 2022-08-15 3:31 p.m., James Warren wrote:
>
>>>
>>>      Rich people who could afford to
>>> live on a single salary and don't
>>> trust private schools. Usually, but
>>> not restricted to, "Chester type"
>>> Karens.  Many also live in South End
>>> Halifax and Rockliff (in Ottawa) areas
>>> where there are no "riff-raff."
>>
>> Can't be many of those.
>>
>
>     How do you know? Don't pigeon hole
> all home schoolers as rual evangelists.
> I would imagine it's time consuming and
> expensive to do it.  I don't know anyone
> who ever was home schooled.

The rich use private schools.

>
>     My guess is it has to be the rich
> because they'd be the only ones who could
> afford to do so.

They are schooled in Genesis and little else
I'd guess. :)

>
>>>     The crème de la crème live in
>>> gated communities. :-)
>>
>> Gotta be smart to avoid taxes. :)
>>
>
>     It seems unlikely that everyone
> in gated communities pay their fair
> share of taxes.  I have no idea what
> it costs to live in those mansions,
> but I don't think even a highly paid
> lawyer or doctor could make enough to
> do so honestly.  Where do they get it?
> Insider trading and tax evasion come
> to mind, but I don't know and have no
> way of finding out.  They sure as hell
> ain't going to tell us!
>
>>
>> Eh?
>>
>
>     You say folks and dinner (in the
> evening) all the time.  Those are US
> dialect versions of the English language.
> :-)
>
>>
>> Eh?
>>
>
>     You say folks and dinner (in the
> evening) all the time.  Those are US
> dialect versions of the English language.
> :-)

Ah, so. :)

>
>    Are you using a VPN and posting from
> Florida or Texas? :-)

Ain't that sophisticated. :)

>
>
>>>
>>>> I agree. Don't sneer at people just because they're
>>>> country folk. Many make good music. :)
>
>     Country FOLK? :-)
>
>>
>> I think I know one! :)
>>
>
>     Not me.  I watch those reruns, but things
> anywhere in 1882 were not 1/10th as good as
> today, and nothing good lives in Kansas! :-)
>
>>
>> And this:
>>
>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e4Ao-iNPPUc
>>
>
>     Stevie Nicks singing Red River Valley is
> far better than those ding-dong "right out of
> Deliverance" playing AC/DC music! :-)
>

To each his own. :)

James Warren

unread,
Aug 15, 2022, 4:46:24 PMAug 15
to
It's a good thing he hid his edumacation too. Fuckin' elite urbanite.


HRM Resident

unread,
Aug 15, 2022, 5:11:44 PMAug 15
to
Mike Spencer <m...@bogus.nodomain.nowhere> wrote:
>
> James Warren <jwwar...@gmail.com> writes:
>
>> I'm not sure I understand your definition of "townie"
>> or your perception of their attributes.
>
> Hats.
>
> When I moved here over 50 years ago, all the country men wore hats.

Preamble: I thought James and I had “out sillied”
you with our nonsense posts. We’re bored! Welcome
back with your words of wisdom.

Yes, I think you nailed it. I never thought of that,
but you are right on the money. Townies wouldn’t be caught dead with a
ball cap or toque on.

DW and I wondered what the female equivalent
is. She thinks it’s heels. Not necessarily stilettos, but
you won’t catch a townie wearing loafers or
sneakers (unless they’re overpriced Converse
All-Stars.) They’re always jacked up 2-4 inches with
something on the back end of their feet, even if it
means going to Walmart in agony for stuff.

County women prefer to be comfortable and
rarely wear heels except for weddings and such.

--
HRM Resident

James Warren

unread,
Aug 15, 2022, 5:28:19 PMAug 15
to
On 2022-08-15 6:11 PM, HRM Resident wrote:
> Mike Spencer <m...@bogus.nodomain.nowhere> wrote:
>>
>> James Warren <jwwar...@gmail.com> writes:
>>
>>> I'm not sure I understand your definition of "townie"
>>> or your perception of their attributes.
>>
>> Hats.
>>
>> When I moved here over 50 years ago, all the country men wore hats.
>
> Preamble: I thought James and I had “out sillied”
> you with our nonsense posts. We’re bored! Welcome
> back with your words of wisdom.
>
> Yes, I think you nailed it. I never thought of that,
> but you are right on the money. Townies wouldn’t be caught dead with a
> ball cap or toque on.
>
> DW and I wondered what the female equivalent
> is. She thinks it’s heels. Not necessarily stilettos, but
> you won’t catch a townie wearing loafers or
> sneakers (unless they’re overpriced Converse
> All-Stars.) They’re always jacked up 2-4 inches with
> something on the back end of their feet, even if it
> means going to Walmart in agony for stuff.

My wife is gonna scream at that. :)

>
> County women prefer to be comfortable and
> rarely wear heels except for weddings and such.
>

I guess we is jess country folk. :)

HRM Resident

unread,
Aug 15, 2022, 6:14:45 PMAug 15
to
James Warren <jwwar...@gmail.com> wrote:

>
> My wife is gonna scream at that. :)
>

As in she wears heels or doesn’t? I don’t want
any irate women hunting me down with a hatchet!

Tell her I didn’t mean it! :-)

>>
>> County women prefer to be comfortable and
>> rarely wear heels except for weddings and such.
>>
>
> I guess we is jess country folk. :)
>

Maybe I am safe! :-)

--
HRM Resident

James Warren

unread,
Aug 15, 2022, 6:38:17 PMAug 15
to
On 2022-08-15 7:14 PM, HRM Resident wrote:
> James Warren <jwwar...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>>
>> My wife is gonna scream at that. :)
>>
>
> As in she wears heels or doesn’t? I don’t want
> any irate women hunting me down with a hatchet!

She don't.

>
> Tell her I didn’t mean it! :-)
>
>>>
>>> County women prefer to be comfortable and
>>> rarely wear heels except for weddings and such.
>>>
>>
>> I guess we is jess country folk. :)
>>
>
> Maybe I am safe! :-)
>

I am harmless. :)

HRM Resident

unread,
Aug 15, 2022, 6:46:22 PMAug 15
to
James Warren <jwwar...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On 2022-08-15 7:14 PM, HRM Resident wrote:
>> James Warren <jwwar...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> My wife is gonna scream at that. :)
>>>
>>
>> As in she wears heels or doesn’t? I don’t want
>> any irate women hunting me down with a hatchet!
>
> She don't.
>

Then she’s not a townie! Phew! Even if she’s from a “town.” It’s a
state of mind. :-)

>>
>>
>> Maybe I am safe! :-)
>>
>
> I am harmless. :)
>

YOU I don’t fear, but “Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned!”

--
HRM Resident

James Warren

unread,
Aug 15, 2022, 7:13:27 PMAug 15
to
On 2022-08-15 7:46 PM, HRM Resident wrote:
> James Warren <jwwar...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On 2022-08-15 7:14 PM, HRM Resident wrote:
>>> James Warren <jwwar...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>> My wife is gonna scream at that. :)
>>>>
>>>
>>> As in she wears heels or doesn’t? I don’t want
>>> any irate women hunting me down with a hatchet!
>>
>> She don't.
>>
>
> Then she’s not a townie! Phew! Even if she’s from a “town.” It’s a
> state of mind. :-)

She was born in Rivers Camp Manitoba which no longer exists. Definitely
not a townie.

>
>>>
>>>
>>> Maybe I am safe! :-)
>>>
>>
>> I am harmless. :)
>>
>
> YOU I don’t fear, but “Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned!”
>

Don't we know it! :)

Mike Spencer

unread,
Aug 15, 2022, 11:34:24 PMAug 15
to

HRM Resident <hrm...@gmail.com> writes:

> DW and I wondered what the female equivalent is. She thinks it's
> heels.

I once had a complaint that justified seeing a neurologist. Not life
threatening so by the time the appointment rolled around, I had
figured out what caused it: sitting for hours at the computer wearing
moccasins with my feet wedged back into a posiition similar to that
forced by very high heeled pumps.

I asked the neurologist if he saw many women with similar complaints
due to high heels and he averred that it was indeed a common thing.

I've always figured a woman who wears serious footwear -- work boots,
combat boots, Peter Limmer hand-made walking shoes or the like -- was
worth a second look. (Western riding boots don't make it unless the
woman is actively engaged in riding because you can't walk in them.
Frye/eastern/English riding boots context-dependent, possible excess
chi-chi.)
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