proper term

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Carol

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Sep 6, 2011, 7:07:20 PM9/6/11
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I'm trying to figure out the proper way of writing Bell Tree.
Bell Tree, Bell tree, bell tree, belltree, Belltree.
Are we capitalizing both B and T in a sentence? or just the B or
neither? Have we decided on 2 separate words or one?
I've seen the term in all of these different ways by various
professionals.
Which one is it?
Carol Scheel

Nancy Tipton

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Sep 6, 2011, 7:47:23 PM9/6/11
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Fact: It shouldn't be capitalized it all, unless it is part of a title. (Would you capitalize "trumpet" or "piano"? I hope not, and I think a bell tree is a musical instrument--it's just one we can reconfigure.) When used in a title, if it's one word, it would be "Belltree," and if it's two words, it would be "Bell Tree."

Opinion: I personally think it should be two words, unless we (i.e., authorities in our field and/or a majority of ringers) determine that it's going to be one word. It would be interesting to hear from "pioneers" in the form, like Louise Frier and Barbara Brocker. I would compare this to the word "handbell" itself. According to spell checkers, that isn't a word . . . but we all know that it IS a word, and a very important one too! Handbell musicians have determined over the years that this is a word and have made it such. Do we want to do that with "belltree"? 


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Benjamin Tucker

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Sep 6, 2011, 8:44:25 PM9/6/11
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I would say it could be written any way as long as it is clear what you are
wanting. Each publisher probably has their own way to notate it, which is
the reason for all the different variations.

-Ben Tucker

Michele Sharik

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Sep 7, 2011, 2:07:32 PM9/7/11
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The problem I see us that "bell tree" is another name for an entirely different instrument not involving handbells. It's also known as a "chime tree" or a "mark tree". This has caused some confusion when speaking to other percussionists.

Therefore, I suggest that we use the term "handbell tree" formally, while of course feeling free to use "bell tree" amongst ourselves.

-Michèle

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Joseph D. Daniel

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Sep 7, 2011, 2:15:54 PM9/7/11
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Thank you, Cathy!

*****
Dr. Joseph D. Daniel
248.752.4891
joseph....@gmail.com



On Wed, Sep 7, 2011 at 2:13 PM, Cathy Moklebust <cmo...@yahoo.com> wrote:
Actually, a bell tree is not a mark tree, chime tree, or bar chimes.  A bell tree is a vertical percussion instrument consisting of nested cup bells on a stand, and played with a small, metal headed mallet.

Cathy A. Moklebust
Eagle Grove, IA
http://www.cathymoklebust.net

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Brian Parrott

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Sep 7, 2011, 2:23:28 PM9/7/11
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Not knowing what any of these were (except a handbell tree of course), I looked them up.

For those interested: a mark tree (chime tree) is common referred to (improperly according to wikipedia) as windchimes and is a set of small chimes of varying length hung from a bar and played with a finger or stick.  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chime_tree)

A bell tree is a set of nested bowls on a vertical rod. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell_tree)

A handbell tree is not listed in wikipedia .... someone want to fix that?  (and no, this is not the Campanile "someone")

Brian

Sueda Luttrell

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Sep 7, 2011, 2:32:49 PM9/7/11
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Does anyone have recommendations for handbells with harp(s) repertoire?  I've been at my current church position as organist for a year and have re-launched the bell program which had been on hiatus during that time (for a couple of good reasons).  We're working with a 3 octave set and have plenty of ringers, but with widely varying degrees of bell/music experience.  A fantastic harp trio will be with us for Lessons & Carols in December, and it's been suggested that we might combine bells with harp.  I don't think the bell choir should attempt more than Level 2 during these first few months, because there is much to teach/learn.  So - any ideas for 3 octave settings, fairly easy, for bells to go along with 1-3 harpists who can play anything?

Sueda Luttrell
Fort Worth, TX
--- On Wed, 9/7/11, Brian Parrott <b2pa...@gmail.com> wrote:

From: Brian Parrott <b2pa...@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [HB-L] proper term

Cathy Moklebust

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Sep 7, 2011, 2:13:56 PM9/7/11
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Actually, a bell tree is not a mark tree, chime tree, or bar chimes.  A bell tree is a vertical percussion instrument consisting of nested cup bells on a stand, and played with a small, metal headed mallet.

Cathy A. Moklebust
Eagle Grove, IA
http://www.cathymoklebust.net

From: Michele Sharik <mic...@thegoldendance.com>
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Nancy Kirkner

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Sep 7, 2011, 3:18:50 PM9/7/11
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Hi, Cathy, do you happen to know what the tuning/temperament is on the
percussion "bell tree?" I actually have one of these, the Latin
Percussion brand on a stand, which I received as a birthday gift
several years ago. The person who gave it to me called it a Japanese
bell tree and said it was tuned to an Eastern scale. When I've played
it in concert, I've called it a "Japanese bell tree" and called the
handbell tree an "English bell tree." Then I explain them both in the
program notes. If I've been doing it wrong, I'd like to correct it.

Brian, you may remember seeing mine. I played it as part of my
Japanese solo at BOC's 'Aspiring to Bronze' event a couple of years
ago.

Thanks -

Nancy Kirkner
Seattle
www.solobells.com
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuEKDQHBDgY

Michele Sharik

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Sep 7, 2011, 3:46:23 PM9/7/11
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Yes that's exactly tge instrument I meant - the cupped bells. I've heard other percussionists refer to it by many names. 

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Heitz Handbells

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Sep 7, 2011, 3:58:17 PM9/7/11
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So then, maybe we should be calling it "handbell tree".
Since we are musicians and there are other musicians who use a different bell tree (obviously the word is taken), then we should
define our instrument more exactly.
C arol
 
Carol A. Scheel, Norm P. Heitz
Heitz Handbells and Music LLC
612-208-1741
1 (877 or 866) 426-3235
www.heitzhandbells.com
From: Nancy Kirkner <bell....@gmail.com>
To: Temp-handbell-l <handb...@googlegroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 2:18 PM
Subject: [HB-L] Re: bell tree vs. mark tree, chime tree, etc.

Nicholas Barnard

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Sep 7, 2011, 4:26:23 PM9/7/11
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On Sep 7, 2011, at 11:23 AM, Brian Parrott wrote:
> A handbell tree is not listed in wikipedia .... someone want to fix that? (and no, this is not the Campanile "someone")

Fixed: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Handbell_tree

Although, I thought it was best to make it part of the Handbell article. Now all we need is a picture showing someone playing a Handbell tree. Does anyone have one which they're willing to licence under the GDFL, Creative Commons Attribute-SA, or just placing it in the public domain? Reply to me privately if you have one.

Also while I'm on the topic. Does anyone have a drawing of a bell that they'd be willing to put in the same license? I have a funny handbell shirt I've been wanting to make, but I don't have the necessary graphics/graphic ability.

Warm Regards,
Nick Barnard
The Resonance Ringers
Seattle, WA

Thomas Simpson

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Sep 7, 2011, 4:47:40 PM9/7/11
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I remember it being played with a striker and not a mallet. No? 




Thomas

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Joseph D. Daniel

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Sep 7, 2011, 4:49:08 PM9/7/11
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Cathy is correct. It's played with a stick with a metal cap on it.


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Dr. Joseph D. Daniel
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Susan T. Nelson

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Sep 7, 2011, 4:53:46 PM9/7/11
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Yup.  It's the same kind of metal mallet used for crotales.

Sue

Thomas Simpson

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Sep 7, 2011, 4:53:40 PM9/7/11
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And. FYI. A mark tree makes that tink-a-ling sound you hear at the end of a ballad. It's sustained and gives that "awwww" effect. 

A bell tree (very $$$$ btw) on the other hand makes a sharp "zing" like sound. It's short and not sustain a lot. You hear it a lot in Disney cartoon when things are flying around. The Genie in Aladin comes to mind here. 


Thomas

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On Sep 7, 2011, at 11:13 AM, Cathy Moklebust <cmo...@yahoo.com> wrote:

Thomas Simpson

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Sep 7, 2011, 4:55:26 PM9/7/11
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Hmmm not the ones I've played!!  



Thomas

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Cathy Moklebust

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Sep 7, 2011, 5:49:57 PM9/7/11
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Nope, Nancy, I don't know what the tuning/temperament is for the standard bell tree.  All I know is that the LP bell tree is "26 brass bells ranging in pitch" (description given on musiciansfriend.com).  Maybe I'll go upstairs and play mine...

Interestingly, Thomas, it describes the mallets as "metal-tipped strikers" (!)  I prefer to call them mallets because they have an actual head, not just a "tip".  They actually look a lot like metal glockenspiel mallets, albeit the shafts are a bit more flexible than glock mallets.
 
Cathy A. Moklebust
From: Nancy Kirkner <bell....@gmail.com>
To: Temp-handbell-l <handb...@googlegroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 2:18 PM
Subject: [HB-L] Re: bell tree vs. mark tree, chime tree, etc.

Joseph D. Daniel

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Sep 7, 2011, 5:53:14 PM9/7/11
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I believe the official instrument name is Chinese Bell Tree. I think I heard that they were first used by Berlioz in his "Requiem", but that information may be a figment of my imagination. I've been looking around for a book that can confirm that, but so far to no avail!


Joseph


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Dr. Joseph D. Daniel
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Cathy Moklebust

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Sep 7, 2011, 6:06:18 PM9/7/11
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Well.....some dealers will say "Chinese bell tree," but we generally just say "bell tree."  For instance, Lone Star Percussion calls the LP450 a "Chinese bell tree," but the LP official website does not use the word "Chinese" in its own description of the instrument.

Had enough, everyone?
 
Cathy A. Moklebust
Eagle Grove, IA
http://www.cathymoklebust.net
From: Joseph D. Daniel <joseph....@gmail.com>
To: handb...@googlegroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 4:53 PM
Subject: Re: [HB-L] Re: bell tree vs. mark tree, chime tree, etc.

Joseph D. Daniel

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Sep 7, 2011, 6:07:29 PM9/7/11
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Actually, I was enjoying the break from actual handbell talk! (gasp!)

Thanks, Cathy, for the extra info.


*****
Dr. Joseph D. Daniel
248.752.4891
joseph....@gmail.com



Thomas Simpson

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Sep 7, 2011, 6:07:20 PM9/7/11
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Ours looks like an old triangle banger. Probably is!! 



Thomas 

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Thomas Simpson

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Sep 7, 2011, 6:08:58 PM9/7/11
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Should that be "Asian-American Bell Tree"???


:-)




T


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Cathy Moklebust

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Sep 7, 2011, 6:15:25 PM9/7/11
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I believe the instrument was introduced in the 1950's, and it was Andrew Lloyd Webber who used the bell tree in his Requiem  (1985).
 
Cathy A. Moklebust
Eagle Grove, IA
http://www.cathymoklebust.net
From: Joseph D. Daniel <joseph....@gmail.com>
To: handb...@googlegroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 4:53 PM
Subject: Re: [HB-L] Re: bell tree vs. mark tree, chime tree, etc.

Joseph D. Daniel

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Sep 7, 2011, 6:16:28 PM9/7/11
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Wonderful, Cathy!

I thank you for the information...Wrong Requiem!


*****
Dr. Joseph D. Daniel
248.752.4891
joseph....@gmail.com



Susan T. Nelson

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Sep 7, 2011, 6:15:41 PM9/7/11
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Maybe they lost the original mallet.  A triangle beater will do in a pinch.

Sue

Susan T. Nelson

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Sep 7, 2011, 6:41:14 PM9/7/11
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Me too!  It's nice to have an accomplished percussionist such as Cathy on the list!

Sue

cmo...@yahoo.com

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Sep 7, 2011, 6:44:41 PM9/7/11
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Thanks, Sue! I enjoy being able to post about a topic about which I actually know something. :-)

Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


From: "Susan T. Nelson" <sne...@rider.edu>
Date: Wed, 7 Sep 2011 18:41:14 -0400 (EDT)

Joseph D. Daniel

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Sep 7, 2011, 6:45:34 PM9/7/11
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I agree with Sue!

I really appreciated the information!


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Dr. Joseph D. Daniel
248.752.4891
joseph....@gmail.com



cmo...@yahoo.com

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Sep 7, 2011, 6:54:04 PM9/7/11
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Thanks, Joseph! Glad to be of service.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


From: "Joseph D. Daniel" <joseph....@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 7 Sep 2011 18:45:34 -0400
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