Lessons learned moving from GWT to Spring MVC

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Ed

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May 28, 2013, 10:21:22 AM5/28/13
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Just wanted to share the following webinar:
"Lessons learned moving from GWT to Spring MVC"
I was just listening to it (it's live now)... and really didn't like it...

The speaker wasn't talking very nice about GWT, not very objective...  all the little negatives things where made BIG...
Or maybe they had very bad developers as they talked about slow development, hosted mode startup times with over a minute :(.... etc.. etc...
Or maybe they were just using gwt 1.1 ;)

Strangge.... not my experience at all...

Tomek Kańka

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May 28, 2013, 6:14:24 PM5/28/13
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How can one compare something what  lives almost entirely in presentation-layer and has none strong dependencies on server-side (GWT) with framework which is focused on server-side without any real widget library?

Every SpringMVC app I developed used jQuery to add better experience to users.

Thomas Broyer

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May 29, 2013, 11:08:48 AM5/29/13
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On Wednesday, May 29, 2013 12:14:24 AM UTC+2, Tomek Kańka wrote:
How can one compare something what  lives almost entirely in presentation-layer and has none strong dependencies on server-side (GWT) with framework which is focused on server-side without any real widget library?

Exactly what I wonder every time Matt Raible presents his "Comparing JVM Web Frameworks" session.

Ed Bras

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May 29, 2013, 3:30:51 PM5/29/13
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To be honest: I don't even know another  framework like GWT that match my desired setup ... Do they even exists? So it's like comparing peers and bananas...

My setup (which I love).. A separate backend (Spring) and frontend (GWT), that are deployed separately in respectively Tomcat and Apache httpd.
A few nice things:
1) Separate development of backend and front end.
2) Separate teams for backend and frontend (RPC communication through contract interfaces). Overcomes unncessary dependencies that slows down development... As such: fast development, changes and bug solving...
3) Fast startup of dev mode due to noserver mode (no need for gwt yetty/tomcat).
4) Full control/inside of communication between backend and front-end, that leads to easy performance optimization.
etc...

Which frameworks can offer this?
Note: before I also had both frontend and backend in one war, which is ok for smaller projects, or if it's required by the client environment, but the separation of frontend and backend works very nice...



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Juan Pablo Gardella

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May 29, 2013, 3:32:52 PM5/29/13
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Thanks for sharing!!


2013/5/29 Ed Bras <post2...@gmail.com>

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