The Scout Report -- Volume 26, Number 35

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The Scout Report
September 11, 2020
Volume 26, Number 35
-----
A Publication of Internet Scout
Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison
=======

General Interest
1. The Bard is Born
2. Pew Report: Parenting Children in the Age of Screens
3. Science Pickle
4. A Hip-Hop Booklist
5. Environmental Justice Atlas
Theme: Plant Podcasts
6. Black in the Garden
7. In Defense of Plants
8. Planted: Finding Your Roots in STEM Careers
9. On the Ledge Podcast
10. The Native Plant Podcast
Revisited
11. Plants and Pipettes Podcast

If you would like to make a tax-deductible contribution to support
The Scout Report and the work of Internet Scout, please visit:
 http://scoutr.pt/donate

If you'd like to know how the Internet Scout team selects resources for
inclusion in the Scout Report, visit our Selection Criteria page at:
 

For more information on all services of Internet Scout, please
visit our Website: https://scout.wisc.edu

The Scout Report on the Web:
 Current issue: https://scout.wisc.edu/report/current
This issue:
 

Feedback is always welcome: sc...@scout.wisc.edu

General Interest

1. The Bard is Born

Teleport to Warwickshire with <i>The Bard is Born</i>, a digital exhibition
honoring William Shakespeare, the "Bard of Avon." Launched in honor of
Shakespeare's birthday (celebrated on April 23), readers can enjoy the
exhibition's highlights year-round at the link above. This resource,
interspersed with pictures and prose, explores the life and work of the
famous writer. The content is categorized in several sections, including
Shakespeare's Birth and Birthday, Historical Sources for Henry V, and
Boydell's Gallery. These various panels provide historical insights on
Shakespeare's upbringing and literary influences, with some fun facts that
may be new to even devoted fans. For example, a 1769 "jubilee" celebrating
Shakespeare's birthday was widely criticized because "not a single line
from Shakespeare was performed." The project is curated by Jill Gage and
directed by Diane Dillon. It is supported by the Newberry, Chicago's
independent research library, in partnership with the Chicago Shakespeare
Theater and the Shakespeare Project of Chicago. [EMB]

2. Pew Report: Parenting Children in the Age of Screens

Parents and caregivers know that technology use and screen time limits are
highly debated topics. As many schools and services move online in light of
COVID-19, readers may find themselves modifying their children's technology
policy. This report, Parenting Children in the Age of Screens, may provide
insights (and comfort in knowing many others are considering the challenges
of technology and parenting). Based on data from a March 2020 survey
conducted by the Pew Research Center, the report finds "a majority of
parents in the United States (66 percent) ... say that parenting is harder
today than it was 20 years ago, with many in this group citing technology
as a reason why." The main page summarizes the other major findings of the
study. For example, the majority of those surveyed felt that children under
age 12 should not have their own smartphone. Concerns are not limited to
children. Many parents also reported worries that their own technology use
"can get in the way of spending quality time with their children." Those
surveyed cited many information sources that form their screen time
opinions, including healthcare professionals, educators, and social media.
The following pages analyze more specific data, including "parental views
about YouTube," and "parenting approaches and concerns related to digital
devices." The report, published in July 2020, was compiled by a research
team including Brooke Auxier, Monica Anderson, Andrew Perrin, and Erica
Turner. [EMB]

3. Science Pickle

Designed for educators and enthusiastic learners of any age (though most
suitable for middle and high school students), Science Pickle provides
various resources (readings, animations, games, and more) for "in-depth,
varied, and connectable learning." Activities are "self-paced" and
"self-guided," perfect for classroom settings and independent use,
especially in an online learning environment. Currently, the site focuses
on two concepts. The first concept, Creative Thinking, is divided into
three units: Learning, Observing, and Questioning. The second concept,
Earth Systems, covers various subtopics, including Energy, Atmosphere, and
Precipitation. Each of these topics has learning plans composed of text,
graphics, and quizzes that allow users to build (and then test) their
skills. For example, the Questioning section begins with an introductory
survey, then defines different types of "questioners" (with games to
exemplify each), and concludes with a primer on "strategies for
questioning." Science Pickle was designed by curriculum developer and
former meteorologist John Pickle, who wanted to create a site that brought
"self-choice into learning." [EMB]

4. A Hip-Hop Booklist
&utm_source=editorial&utm_medium=SLJTW&utm_term=&utm_content=&utm_campaign=articles

Filled with intriguing titles like Ibi Zoboi's <i>My Life as an Ice Cream
Sandwich</i> the School Library Journal's (SLJ) "A Hip-Hop Booklist" offers
an entertaining collection of reads that librarians gearing up for a new
school year may find especially useful. Curated by Desiree Thomas, a teen
librarian, the list highlights over a dozen titles celebrated for "delving
into the genre's multilayered origins in rap, rhythm and soul, poetry and
other influences." The list includes books spanning various genres, from
young adult fiction novels addressing themes such as "consent, religion,
and racism," to memoirs from popular artists such as Rick Ross and Gucci
Mane. After browsing the list, readers have the option to add comments,
including suggestions of additional applicable books. Readers who enjoy
this list may also want to check out "Hip-Hop EDU," a similar resource from
SLJ discussing "us[ing] music to spark students' creativity and learning."
It is accessible by clicking the link in the yellow box at the top of the
page. For over six decades, SLJ has featured information on "issues of
interest to the school library and greater educator community." [EMB]

5. Environmental Justice Atlas

Collecting and sharing information and mobilizing communities against
environmental injustice, the Environmental Justice Atlas is a "virtual
space" for ecological advocates. Readers may want to begin on the About
page (under the EJAtlas tab). Here, visitors will find background
information on the project, as well as environmental justice, generally. As
the About section notes, the Atlas "maps conflicts across 10 main
categories," with more than 3,000 cases of ecological conflict included in
the database. The Legend section of the Home page explains what each
pinpoint signifies (for example, the green leaf is used for "biodiversity
conservation conflicts," and the blue icon represents "water management").
Readers may elect to browse the map freely or use the right-hand panel to
sort by country, company, commodity, and type. Users can also apply one of
the many filters (for example, "impacts" or "outcomes"). Clicking on each
pinpoint, users will find information about the conflict, including "the
investors ... and their impacts," and "basic data ... [with] project
details." Have an idea for a site not yet included? Register an account or
fill out a brief survey to contribute. The Atlas is available in seven
languages (Arabic, English, French, Italian, Madarin, Spanish, and
Turkish). It was created by researchers at the Institute of Environmental
Science and Technology at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, with
support from the ENVJUST project, the Academic-Activist Co-Production of
Knowledge for Environmental Justice, and the Transformations to
Sustainability Programme. [EMB]

Theme: Plant Podcasts

6. Black in the Garden

Settle in and spend some time with "Plantrepreneur" Colah B. Tawkin on her
podcast <i>Black in the Garden</i>. Described as an "intersection of Black
Culture and horticulture," the show seeks to create space for diverse
voices in the gardening world. Tawkin's selects episode topics that
"directly influence and impact Black plant keepers as we blackily impact
and influence the world." These topics include authentic business
practices, plant styling, and Black liberation. Readers may especially
enjoy the May 12, 2020 episode, "5 Survival Lessons from our Plants," which
contains wisdom stemming from horticulture during a pandemic. As of this
write-up, more than 30 episodes (of various lengths) have been released and
listeners can find them on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, and
Radio Public, among other platforms. Looking for additional content from
Tawkin? Find her on Instagram, @blackinthegarden. Posts include teasers and
highlights from shows, as well as bonus content and (of course) some great
plant photographs. [EMB]

7. In Defense of Plants
http://www.indefenseofplants.com/

Launched in 2015, <i>In Defense of Plants</i> makes the case for the
evolutionary resiliency and environmental impact of flora. Host Matt
Candeias seeks to share his self-described "obsess[ion] with the botanical
world," reminding listeners that "plants are everything on this planet."
Throughout the show's more than 275 episodes, listeners will hear about a
range of topics, such as assessing extinction risk (Episode 275 "Saving
Sonora: The Green Desert" with special guest Dr. Helen Rowe) and harnessing
plant-power for mindfulness (Episode 269 "Cultivating Peace" with special
guest Derek Haynes). Most episodes are about an hour long, perfect for a
commute or lunch break. On the Podcast page, readers will find an archive
of all episodes, with descriptions of each episode's guest(s) and content.
Readers will also find a frequently updated blog and embedded videos that
build on some episodes' content. Beyond the website, listeners can tune in
to the show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and other popular listening
platforms. New episodes are released weekly, so check back often or
subscribe to never miss a show. [EMB]

8. Planted: Finding Your Roots in STEM Careers

Produced by the Morton Arboretum, <i>Planted: Finding Your Roots in STEM
Careers</i> is a podcast designed to connect students with "plant
professionals," demonstrating that various exciting science career paths
exist. The podcast has two seasons with nine episodes each. Released in
2018, the first season focuses on "the journey into a STEM career." These
episodes cover topics like "choosing a direction" (see Episode 3),
"navigating multiple opportunities" (see Episode 5), and "final
destinations" (see Episode 7). Released in 2019, the second season
discusses the "highlighted traits of individuals in various stages of their
STEM careers." For example, Episode 1 concentrates on "collaboration," and
Episode 9 looks at "adventure." Readers can find the podcast on Apple
Podcasts, Stitcher, and Google Podcasts, or tune in by clicking the link
next to "Listen" on the page linked above. Clicking on an episode from the
right-hand panel leads to "bonus" materials, including articles and
activities. Listeners may also enjoy the "STEM Career Overview" chart
linked at the bottom of the page. The chart profiles various STEM careers,
compiling job descriptions, educational requirements, and possible
employment opportunities. [EMB]

9. On the Ledge Podcast

<i>On the Ledge</i> is a podcast on a heroic mission: "saving the world's
houseplants, one episode at a time." Jane Perrone, a journalist and
gardener, hosts the show and runs its corresponding blog. Readers will find
both the podcast and blog at the link above. Recent podcast episodes
discuss terrariums (see Episode 149) and terrestrial ecology (see Episode
148), while the most recent blog posts cover rare houseplant varieties and
picking the perfect gift for friends or family who love gardening. Novice
horticulturalists may especially enjoy the show's site, as it has a series
of episodes designed with newcomers in mind. The page linked above houses a
list of curated episode guides such as "Complete Beginners, Start Here..."
and "Hints, Tips, Questions, and Answers." Experienced horticulturalists
may enjoy some of the episode guides that follow, sorted by species (e.g.
"flowering houseplants" and "succulents and cacti") and topic (e.g.
"sustainability" and "houseplant styling"). Of course, listeners are always
welcome to binge all the episodes (find the more than 150 episodes on most
major podcast platforms). [EMB]

10. The Native Plant Podcast

Rooted in a friendship initiated at the Cullowhee Native Plant Conference,
<i>The Native Plant Podcast</i> has been enlightening listeners with all
things conservation and vegetation since 2016. The show has grown to have a
significant following, including winning a 2019 GardenComm Media Awards
Silver Medal. The trio of hosts invite a variety of guests on their show
(from ecotourism experts to palynology professors) to discuss relevant
research and explore numerous plant-related questions. Curious how hip hop
can serve as a platform for horticulture? Check out "Hip Hop Forestry"
(July 11, 2019). Wondering the purpose of controlled burns? Tune in to
"Scientists are burning the woods... and no one knows why!" (July 13,
2020). The show has 5 seasons and nearly 100 episodes. Readers can find all
of these installments on the Archive page (categorized chronologically), as
well as on Apple Podcasts.  [EMB]

Revisited

11. Plants and Pipettes Podcast

<i>Since its feature in the 09-27-2019 Scout Report, Plants and Pipettes
continues to release weekly episodes on everything from "intersectional
feminism in academia," (see the July 31, 2020 episode) to "self-drilling
seeds," (see the July 17, 2020 episode).</i>

Readers curious about the world of scientific research, particularly
molecular plant biology, may want to check out Plants and Pipettes. First
launched in February 2019, this delightfully quirky podcast is the work of
Joram Schwartzmann and Tegan Armarego-Marriott, who are respectively a PhD
student and a postdoc at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant
Physiology in Potsdam, Germany. In each episode, Tegan and Joram take turns
explaining and breaking down a recent scientific paper, translating the
jargon into approachable language that general audiences can more easily
grasp. Each episode also features the podcasters' favorite plant of the
week, and they frequently discuss other aspects of research and academic
publishing, as well as scientific news and fun cat facts. Episodes vary in
length, but most are around an hour long. Those interested can stream and
download episodes of Plants and Pipettes at the link above, and the podcast
is also available via platforms such as Apple Podcasts. Readers should also
check out the rest of the Plants and Pipettes website, where they will find
engagingly written blog posts (found under Articles) as well as a short
Glossary of scientific terms (found at the bottom).

For reproduction information about the Scout Report, please see:
 

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed
in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily
reflect the views of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, or the
National Science Foundation.

======                        ======

Index for September 11, 2020

======                        ======

1. The Bard is Born


2. Pew Report: Parenting Children in the Age of Screens


3. Science Pickle
 
4. A Hip-Hop Booklist

&utm_source=editorial&utm_medium=SLJTW&utm_term=&utm_content=&utm_campaign=articles
5. Environmental Justice Atlas
 
6. Black in the Garden
 
7. In Defense of Plants
 http://www.indefenseofplants.com/
8. Planted: Finding Your Roots in STEM Careers


9. On the Ledge Podcast


10. The Native Plant Podcast
 
11. Plants and Pipettes Podcast
 

======                                ====

Subscription and Contact Information

====                                ======

To receive the electronic mail version of the Scout Report each week,
subscribe to the scout-report mailing list. This is the only mail you
will receive from this list.

The Scout Report (ISSN 1092-3861) is published every Friday of the year
except for the Fridays after Christmas and New Years by Internet Scout, located in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Department of Computer
Sciences. Funding sources have included the National Science Foundation and the
University of Wisconsin Libraries.

For information on contributors to the Scout Report, please see the Internet Scout staff page:
 

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September 11, 2020
Volume 26, Number 35

General Interest

Theme: Plant Podcasts

Revisited

If you would like to make a tax-deductible contribution to support The Scout Report and the work of Internet Scout, please visit our donation page.

General Interest

Back to Top
The Bard is Born
Social studies

Teleport to Warwickshire with The Bard is Born, a digital exhibition honoring William Shakespeare, the "Bard of Avon." Launched in honor of Shakespeare's birthday (celebrated on April 23), readers can enjoy the exhibition's highlights year-round at the link above. This resource, interspersed with pictures and prose, explores the life and work of the famous writer. The content is categorized in several sections, including Shakespeare's Birth and Birthday, Historical Sources for Henry V, and Boydell's Gallery. These various panels provide historical insights on Shakespeare's upbringing and literary influences, with some fun facts that may be new to even devoted fans. For example, a 1769 "jubilee" celebrating Shakespeare's birthday was widely criticized because "not a single line from Shakespeare was performed." The project is curated by Jill Gage and directed by Diane Dillon. It is supported by the Newberry, Chicago's independent research library, in partnership with the Chicago Shakespeare Theater and the Shakespeare Project of Chicago. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Pew Report: Parenting Children in the Age of Screens
Social studies

Parents and caregivers know that technology use and screen time limits are highly debated topics. As many schools and services move online in light of COVID-19, readers may find themselves modifying their children's technology policy. This report, Parenting Children in the Age of Screens, may provide insights (and comfort in knowing many others are considering the challenges of technology and parenting). Based on data from a March 2020 survey conducted by the Pew Research Center, the report finds "a majority of parents in the United States (66 percent) ... say that parenting is harder today than it was 20 years ago, with many in this group citing technology as a reason why." The main page summarizes the other major findings of the study. For example, the majority of those surveyed felt that children under age 12 should not have their own smartphone. Concerns are not limited to children. Many parents also reported worries that their own technology use "can get in the way of spending quality time with their children." Those surveyed cited many information sources that form their screen time opinions, including healthcare professionals, educators, and social media. The following pages analyze more specific data, including "parental views about YouTube," and "parenting approaches and concerns related to digital devices." The report, published in July 2020, was compiled by a research team including Brooke Auxier, Monica Anderson, Andrew Perrin, and Erica Turner. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Science Pickle
Science

Designed for educators and enthusiastic learners of any age (though most suitable for middle and high school students), Science Pickle provides various resources (readings, animations, games, and more) for "in-depth, varied, and connectable learning." Activities are "self-paced" and "self-guided," perfect for classroom settings and independent use, especially in an online learning environment. Currently, the site focuses on two concepts. The first concept, Creative Thinking, is divided into three units: Learning, Observing, and Questioning. The second concept, Earth Systems, covers various subtopics, including Energy, Atmosphere, and Precipitation. Each of these topics has learning plans composed of text, graphics, and quizzes that allow users to build (and then test) their skills. For example, the Questioning section begins with an introductory survey, then defines different types of "questioners" (with games to exemplify each), and concludes with a primer on "strategies for questioning." Science Pickle was designed by curriculum developer and former meteorologist John Pickle, who wanted to create a site that brought "self-choice into learning." [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

A Hip-Hop Booklist
Language Arts

Filled with intriguing titles like Ibi Zoboi's My Life as an Ice Cream Sandwich the School Library Journal's (SLJ) "A Hip-Hop Booklist" offers an entertaining collection of reads that librarians gearing up for a new school year may find especially useful. Curated by Desiree Thomas, a teen librarian, the list highlights over a dozen titles celebrated for "delving into the genre's multilayered origins in rap, rhythm and soul, poetry and other influences." The list includes books spanning various genres, from young adult fiction novels addressing themes such as "consent, religion, and racism," to memoirs from popular artists such as Rick Ross and Gucci Mane. After browsing the list, readers have the option to add comments, including suggestions of additional applicable books. Readers who enjoy this list may also want to check out "Hip-Hop EDU," a similar resource from SLJ discussing "us[ing] music to spark students' creativity and learning." It is accessible by clicking the link in the yellow box at the top of the page. For over six decades, SLJ has featured information on "issues of interest to the school library and greater educator community." [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Environmental Justice Atlas
Science

Collecting and sharing information and mobilizing communities against environmental injustice, the Environmental Justice Atlas is a "virtual space" for ecological advocates. Readers may want to begin on the About page (under the EJAtlas tab). Here, visitors will find background information on the project, as well as environmental justice, generally. As the About section notes, the Atlas "maps conflicts across 10 main categories," with more than 3,000 cases of ecological conflict included in the database. The Legend section of the Home page explains what each pinpoint signifies (for example, the green leaf is used for "biodiversity conservation conflicts," and the blue icon represents "water management"). Readers may elect to browse the map freely or use the right-hand panel to sort by country, company, commodity, and type. Users can also apply one of the many filters (for example, "impacts" or "outcomes"). Clicking on each pinpoint, users will find information about the conflict, including "the investors ... and their impacts," and "basic data ... [with] project details." Have an idea for a site not yet included? Register an account or fill out a brief survey to contribute. The Atlas is available in seven languages (Arabic, English, French, Italian, Madarin, Spanish, and Turkish). It was created by researchers at the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, with support from the ENVJUST project, the Academic-Activist Co-Production of Knowledge for Environmental Justice, and the Transformations to Sustainability Programme. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Theme: Plant Podcasts

Back to Top
Black in the Garden
Science

Settle in and spend some time with "Plantrepreneur" Colah B. Tawkin on her podcast Black in the Garden. Described as an "intersection of Black Culture and horticulture," the show seeks to create space for diverse voices in the gardening world. Tawkin's selects episode topics that "directly influence and impact Black plant keepers as we blackily impact and influence the world." These topics include authentic business practices, plant styling, and Black liberation. Readers may especially enjoy the May 12, 2020 episode, "5 Survival Lessons from our Plants," which contains wisdom stemming from horticulture during a pandemic. As of this write-up, more than 30 episodes (of various lengths) have been released and listeners can find them on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, and Radio Public, among other platforms. Looking for additional content from Tawkin? Find her on Instagram, @blackinthegarden. Posts include teasers and highlights from shows, as well as bonus content and (of course) some great plant photographs. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

In Defense of Plants

Launched in 2015, In Defense of Plants makes the case for the evolutionary resiliency and environmental impact of flora. Host Matt Candeias seeks to share his self-described "obsess[ion] with the botanical world," reminding listeners that "plants are everything on this planet." Throughout the show's more than 275 episodes, listeners will hear about a range of topics, such as assessing extinction risk (Episode 275 "Saving Sonora: The Green Desert" with special guest Dr. Helen Rowe) and harnessing plant-power for mindfulness (Episode 269 "Cultivating Peace" with special guest Derek Haynes). Most episodes are about an hour long, perfect for a commute or lunch break. On the Podcast page, readers will find an archive of all episodes, with descriptions of each episode's guest(s) and content. Readers will also find a frequently updated blog and embedded videos that build on some episodes' content. Beyond the website, listeners can tune in to the show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and other popular listening platforms. New episodes are released weekly, so check back often or subscribe to never miss a show. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Planted: Finding Your Roots in STEM Careers
Science

Produced by the Morton Arboretum, Planted: Finding Your Roots in STEM Careers is a podcast designed to connect students with "plant professionals," demonstrating that various exciting science career paths exist. The podcast has two seasons with nine episodes each. Released in 2018, the first season focuses on "the journey into a STEM career." These episodes cover topics like "choosing a direction" (see Episode 3), "navigating multiple opportunities" (see Episode 5), and "final destinations" (see Episode 7). Released in 2019, the second season discusses the "highlighted traits of individuals in various stages of their STEM careers." For example, Episode 1 concentrates on "collaboration," and Episode 9 looks at "adventure." Readers can find the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, and Google Podcasts, or tune in by clicking the link next to "Listen" on the page linked above. Clicking on an episode from the right-hand panel leads to "bonus" materials, including articles and activities. Listeners may also enjoy the "STEM Career Overview" chart linked at the bottom of the page. The chart profiles various STEM careers, compiling job descriptions, educational requirements, and possible employment opportunities. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

On the Ledge Podcast
Science

On the Ledge is a podcast on a heroic mission: "saving the world's houseplants, one episode at a time." Jane Perrone, a journalist and gardener, hosts the show and runs its corresponding blog. Readers will find both the podcast and blog at the link above. Recent podcast episodes discuss terrariums (see Episode 149) and terrestrial ecology (see Episode 148), while the most recent blog posts cover rare houseplant varieties and picking the perfect gift for friends or family who love gardening. Novice horticulturalists may especially enjoy the show's site, as it has a series of episodes designed with newcomers in mind. The page linked above houses a list of curated episode guides such as "Complete Beginners, Start Here..." and "Hints, Tips, Questions, and Answers." Experienced horticulturalists may enjoy some of the episode guides that follow, sorted by species (e.g. "flowering houseplants" and "succulents and cacti") and topic (e.g. "sustainability" and "houseplant styling"). Of course, listeners are always welcome to binge all the episodes (find the more than 150 episodes on most major podcast platforms). [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

The Native Plant Podcast
Science

Rooted in a friendship initiated at the Cullowhee Native Plant Conference, The Native Plant Podcast has been enlightening listeners with all things conservation and vegetation since 2016. The show has grown to have a significant following, including winning a 2019 GardenComm Media Awards Silver Medal. The trio of hosts invite a variety of guests on their show (from ecotourism experts to palynology professors) to discuss relevant research and explore numerous plant-related questions. Curious how hip hop can serve as a platform for horticulture? Check out "Hip Hop Forestry" (July 11, 2019). Wondering the purpose of controlled burns? Tune in to "Scientists are burning the woods... and no one knows why!" (July 13, 2020). The show has 5 seasons and nearly 100 episodes. Readers can find all of these installments on the Archive page (categorized chronologically), as well as on Apple Podcasts. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Revisited

Back to Top
Plants and Pipettes Podcast
Science

Since its feature in the 09-27-2019 Scout Report, Plants and Pipettes continues to release weekly episodes on everything from "intersectional feminism in academia," (see the July 31, 2020 episode) to "self-drilling seeds," (see the July 17, 2020 episode).

Readers curious about the world of scientific research, particularly molecular plant biology, may want to check out Plants and Pipettes. First launched in February 2019, this delightfully quirky podcast is the work of Joram Schwartzmann and Tegan Armarego-Marriott, who are respectively a PhD student and a postdoc at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology in Potsdam, Germany. In each episode, Tegan and Joram take turns explaining and breaking down a recent scientific paper, translating the jargon into approachable language that general audiences can more easily grasp. Each episode also features the podcasters' favorite plant of the week, and they frequently discuss other aspects of research and academic publishing, as well as scientific news and fun cat facts. Episodes vary in length, but most are around an hour long. Those interested can stream and download episodes of Plants and Pipettes at the link above, and the podcast is also available via platforms such as Apple Podcasts. Readers should also check out the rest of the Plants and Pipettes website, where they will find engagingly written blog posts (found under Articles) as well as a short Glossary of scientific terms (found at the bottom).

Comment on or rate this resource

The Scout Report (ISSN 1092-3861) is published every Friday of the year except for the Fridays after Christmas and New Years by the Internet Scout Research Group, based in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Department of Computer Sciences.

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