The Scout Report -- Volume 26, Number 37 (fwd)

0 views
Skip to first unread message

Sam Vaknin author of "Malignant Self-love"

unread,
Sep 26, 2020, 4:01:44 PM9/26/20
to Article Submit Free Books Project, Article Submit Linknfactoid
The Scout Report
September 25, 2020
Volume 26, Number 37
-----
A Publication of Internet Scout
Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison
=======

General Interest
1. Student Success Journal
2. Texas A&M Dinner Tonight
3. Historical Papers Research Archive
4. Special Books by Special Kids
5. Ptable
Theme: National Public Lands Day
6. Guide to Indigenous Land and Territorial Acknowledgements for Cultural
Institutions
7. Biodiversity in National Parks
8. Park Score
9. Conservation 101: A Guide To Land & Water Protection in the US
10. America's National Parks Podcast
Revisited
11. National Public Lands Day
In the News
12. Torched but Tough, Redwoods Fighting to Withstand California's
Wildfires

If you would like to make a tax-deductible contribution to support
The Scout Report and the work of Internet Scout, please visit:
 http://scoutr.pt/donate

If you'd like to know how the Internet Scout team selects resources for
inclusion in the Scout Report, visit our Selection Criteria page at:
 

For more information on all services of Internet Scout, please
visit our Website: https://scout.wisc.edu

The Scout Report on the Web:
 Current issue: https://scout.wisc.edu/report/current
This issue:
 

Feedback is always welcome: sc...@scout.wisc.edu

General Interest

1. Student Success Journal

Guided by the STARS (students, transitions, achievement, retention, and
success) principles, <i>Student Success</i> "explor[es] the experiences of
students in tertiary education." Launched in 2010, the journal is
"international, open-access, [and] peer-viewed," and publishes various
pieces from researchers, educators, and professionals. Karen Nelson from
the University of Southern Queensland serves as Editor-in-Chief, and Tracy
Creagh from Queensland University of Technology is the Journal Manager.
<i>Student Success</i> releases three editions each year. Readers will find
the latest release, a special issue focused on "Enabling Excellence through
Equity," on the Current page. To explore past issues, check out the Issues
and Archives pages. Other browsing options can be found in the right-hand
panel. For example, readers can search across issues with the query bar,
narrow by author or issue in the Browse Journal box, and explore popular
pieces in the Most Viewed Articles box. Additionally, readers will want to
stay tuned for the 2021 special edition on "Student Success in a Global
Pandemic." Slotted for publication in November of 2021, this installment
will focus on educational innovations following the onset of COVID-19. For
more information on this special issue and details on how to submit a paper
for possible publication, check out the 2021 Special Issue section found
under the Announcements tab. [EMB]

2. Texas A&M Dinner Tonight

Created by the Agrilife Extension Service at Texas A&M University, Dinner
Tonight is designed "to provide busy families with quick, healthy, cost
effective recipes that taste great." In addition to the recipe database
(found under Recipes), there are also video demonstrations and useful
guides in the Healthy Cooking Tips section. Readers looking for a place to
begin may enjoy the two-minute video on how to measure ingredients
correctly and the short guide on ensuring meals are stored safely.
Especially handy for using up summer produce, the site has a big section of
vegetable recipes. It is also possible to search by ingredient to retrieve
additional recipes. In the Family Mealtime section, visitors will find
conversation starters to make mealtime fun, family friendly recipes for
picky eaters, and fact sheets on the benefits of cooking at home and eating
together. Dinner Tonight's work was recognized in 2018 by the National
Extension Association of Family & Consumer Sciences. [DS]

3. Historical Papers Research Archive
http://www.historicalpapers.wits.ac.za/index.php?1/P/Home

Established in 1966, the Historical Papers Research Archive is "one of the
largest and most comprehensive independent archives in Southern Africa."
With more than 3,000 collections spanning from the 17th century to present
day, the archive memorializes human rights movements throughout history.
The intentional documentation of civil society is rooted in the belief that
"archives provide the bedrock for society's understanding of the past." To
navigate the various collections, users may want to employ the tools on the
left-side panel. Here, readers can browse by collection or search across
all the collections. Clicking the "Collections Database" link (found on the
Home page under Browse Collections) also allows users to sort options
alphabetically. Items include newspaper clippings, amnesty applications,
and committee records, among many other documents. New users may also enjoy
browsing the "Historical Papers Guide" (linked under Finding Aids).
Historical Papers is a project of the University of Witwatersrand's William
Cullen Library and receives funding from the Atlantic Philanthropies
Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York. [EMB]

4. Special Books by Special Kids

Special Books by Special Kids (SBSK) shares the stories of "people in the
disability/neurodiversity community." In doing so, the project "seeks to
normalize the diversity of the human condition." Host Chris Ulmer first
conceptualized the series when he was a teacher for students with
disabilities and neurodiversities. Originally, he planned to create a book
that explored life from his students' perspectives. In 2016, this vision
evolved into a registered nonprofit and a YouTube channel that today has
garnered more than 2.5 million subscribers and more than 500 million views.
The channel has even been featured by news outlets such as <i>ABC</i> and
<i>BBC</i>. Videos are typically less than 30 minutes long and cover
various topics, from motherhood and mental illness to the college
experience from the perspective of a student with an intellectual
disability. Under Playlists, viewers can narrow videos by series, including
"Love and Disability" and "A Day in the Life." For more SBSK content,
viewers can follow along on Twitter (@chrisulmer) and Instagram
(specialbooksbyspecialkids). [EMB]

5. Ptable

Educators looking for ways to keep classrooms interactive in remote
settings should check out Ptable, a highly regarded tool for chemistry
teachers. Featuring the self-described "world's most popular periodic
table," this interactive science site is packed with information and
activities. A variety of unique features make Ptable stand out from similar
sites. For example, data updates in realtime and is sortable by more than a
dozen properties. More information about these features can be found under
the About tab. Ptable can be focused on Properties, Electrons, Isotypes,
and Compounds (using the corresponding tabs). The information displayed by
toggling over individual elements varies based on this initial selection.
For instance, the Properties view includes an element's melting and boiling
points, while the Electrons view focuses on energy levels. The buttons in
the upper-right corner allow users to adjust aesthetics, such as the screen
width and background color. To find lesson plans that accompany the site's
features, check out the Lesson Plans page under the Products tab (found at
the bottom of the page). Michael Dayah created Ptable in 1997 and has
frequently updated its content since. [EMB]

Theme: National Public Lands Day

6. Guide to Indigenous Land and Territorial Acknowledgements for Cultural
Institutions
http://landacknowledgements.org/

Educators, librarians, and community leaders may enjoy this resource, a
"Guide to Indigenous Land and Territorial Acknowledgements for Cultural
Institutions." The guide is designed for "institutions such as museums,
archives, libraries, and universities," to promote recognition and respect
for "Indigenous homelands, inherent sovereignty, and survivance." Land and
territorial acknowledgements "recognizes the Indigenous peoples who have
been dispossessed from homelands and territories upon which an institution
was built and currently occupies and operates in." On the site, readers can
download the short guide as a PDF and browse additional resources
highlighted on the right-hand panel. These resources include educational
materials, news articles, and multimedia presentations on land
acknowledgement. Felicia Garcia (Chumash) and Jane Anderson, both from New
York University (NYU), created the guide in 2018. They received support
from Decolonize This Place, NYC Stands with Standing Rock, the American
Indian Community House, the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and
Museums, and several other departments within NYU. [EMB]

7. Biodiversity in National Parks

Using information from the public data science site Kaggle, Biodiversity in
National Parks offers unique ways to explore the species diversity found
within the U.S. National Parks. A short video introduces users to the tool,
including navigating the options on the left-hand panel. After watching
this video, users can maneuver this "navigation panel" to explore various
project features. The interactive Parks Map lets visitors zoom in on a
region of interest and toggle over pinpoints to learn about parks in that
region. The Species Table contains more than 100,000 plant and animal
species records (filterable by order, family, and other categories).
Similarly, under the Species Tree tab readers can select a park and a
category to view "a collapsible hierarchical tree of the species." The
Species Charts tab focuses on species quantity, while the Species
Choropleth Map arranges data geographically. This project was launched in
2019 with updates made in 2020. Readers will find the code used to create
this project on GitHuband RCloud (linked in the Welcome section). [EMB]

8. Park Score

Readers curious or concerned about the outdoor access in their community
may want to explore this resource. Notably, "across the United States, 100
million residents don't have a park within a 10-minute walk of home." The
Trust for Public Land is hoping to change that with initiatives such as the
Park Score Index, developed as an extension of their mission "to create
parks and protect land for people, ensuring healthy, livable communities
for generations to come." The Index relies on a variety of measurements,
"access, investment, acreage, and amenities," to calculate its rankings.
The home page summarizes the top-ranking cities and includes a search bar
to look up a city of interest. Click on a city to expand data, including an
analysis of park access based on income and ethnicity and breakdowns of
specific amenities. Wondering which city is ranked number one in 2020?
Hint: it is in the Midwest. To learn more about the methodology used to
create this Index, check out the "ParkServe Methodology" link located at
the bottom of each city's profile. [EMB]

9. Conservation 101: A Guide To Land & Water Protection in the US
http://www.conservationalliance.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Conservation101-Booklet-FINAL_small.pdf

Newcomers to land use and protection may enjoy "Conservation 101," a
comprehensive reference guide compiled in 2015. The guide begins with a
brief introduction to public lands in the United States and conservation
generally. For example, the Public Land Conservation section includes an
outline of "Government Agencies that Manage Public Lands and Affect
Environmental Policy." Next, the guide explains the various protective
statuses assigned to public land. Readers wondering about the difference
between "wilderness" and "wilderness study areas" or "national parks" and
"national monuments" will find the answers in this section. The following
section shifts to private land conservation, with a focus on the Land and
Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), "a Federal program that was established by
Congress in 1964 to provide funds and matching grants to federal, state and
local governments for the acquisition of land and water, and easements on
land and water." The guide concludes with an overview of "core
environmental laws," including the Endangered Species Act and National
Environmental Policy Act. This resource was created through collaboration
between The Conservation Alliance, the Outdoor Industry Association, and
Outdoor Alliance. [EMB]

10. America's National Parks Podcast

Enjoy a virtual outdoor adventure with <i>America's National Parks
Podcast</i>. This podcast has an eye towards storytelling and "takes you
behind the events, people, and nature," that have impacted "the 417 units
managed by the National Park Service." The more than 120 episodes come in a
variety of formats. Some episodes describe the history and future of
specific parks, from King Canyon to the Wild West. Other installments
explore broader historical movements (for example, "The Nine," released on
June 7, 2020, discusses <i>Brown v. Board of Education</i> and school
segregation). Monthly "News from the Parks" episodes provide brief recaps
and updates, from park reopening plans during COVID-19 to legislation and
funding details. Most episodes are less than 30 minutes long. On the site,
readers will find embedded audio and a written synopsis of each episode.
Readers can also listen on Apple Podcasts and Google Play. [EMB]

Revisited

11. National Public Lands Day

<i>Celebrate National Public Lands Day on September 26 with this blast from
the past (last featured in the 01-21-2011 Scout Report). The official
website for the celebration includes several unique tools, including a NPLD
Event Locator and educator toolkits.</i>

Sponsored by the National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF),
National Public Lands Day (NPLD) was started in 1994 with three federal
agencies and 700 volunteers. Today, over 150,000 volunteers take part every
year at over 2,000 locations across the United States. The idea for such a
day came from the work of the Civilian Conservation Corps, and on this
site, visitors can learn about NPLD and how they can participate.
Additionally, visitors can sign up for their newsletter, find a local NPLD
site, and learn about past projects. Many of this year's events will be
virtual, and those interested in volunteering at and/or hosting an event
will find various resources to make it a success. The "NPLD 2020: Setting
Up a Virtual Event" page provides a comprehensive guide on creating safe
and effective virtual experiences. Plus, site nanagers will find a page
with resources curated for coordinating events. The site is also available
in Spanish (found at the bottom of the site by selecting "NEEF en
Espanol").

In the News

12. Torched but Tough, Redwoods Fighting to Withstand California's
Wildfires
2,000-year-old redwoods survive wildfire at California's oldest state park

Wildfire destroys historic buildings at Big Basin State Park, some redwoods
have fallen

Wildfires Hit California's Redwoods And Condors, But There's Still Hope

Redwoods and Fire

California Department of Parks and Recreation: Cultural History
.

Remarkable Redwoods in 360 Virtual Tour

In August, weather-induced wildfires began ravaging California. These fires
caused serious damage to properties and ecosystems, including the state's
oldest state park, Big Basin Redwoods State Park. Unfortunately, many of
the park's buildings succumbed to the flames. Yet, a glimmer of hope
remains. Big Basin contains "the largest continuous stand of old-growth
redwoods south of San Francisco." Several of these resilient redwood trees,
built with thick, fire-resistant bark, continue to stand. This protective
bark is not fail-proof, and high-intensity fires can cause serious damage
or death. However, even with fires burning in their hollows, scientists
"have cautious optimism," that many redwoods will hold on. The full extent
of the damage is still unknown, but Sara Barth (executive director of
Sempervirens Fund, a land trust preserving redwood forests) notes that
these trees serve as a reminder that "redwood forests are resilient and the
people of California are resilient." [EMB]

This first link leads to a story by <i>The Associated Press</i>, picked up
by <i>NBC News</i>, that discusses how the forest is "resetting" in spite
of the blaze. Readers wanting to delve deeper into how redwoods withstand
fires will want to explore the second link, featuring Paul Rogers and Ethan
Baron's coverage for the <i>Santa Cruz Sentinel</i>. The third link
provides a clip from <i>NPR's</i> <i>All Things Considered</i> that expands
on how the fires are affecting California's ecosystems, threatening both
flora (redwoods) and fauna (condor birds). For more information on the
relationship between redwoods and fires, visit the fourth link. Here,
readers will find a series of blog posts on this topic, curated by Save the
Redwoods, a nonprofit organization "protect[ing] and restor[ing] California
redwoods." Those interested in Big Basin's history can find background at
the fifth link on the Cotoni and Quiroste People, who first called the area
home and protected it with indigenous fire and land management practices.
Want to virtually explore a redwood forest? The final link leads to the
National Park Service's "virtual reality" series with eight video episodes
allowing viewers to do.

For reproduction information about the Scout Report, please see:
 

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed
in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily
reflect the views of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, or the
National Science Foundation.

======                        ======

Index for September 25, 2020

======                        ======

1. Student Success Journal
 
2. Texas A&M Dinner Tonight
 
3. Historical Papers Research Archive
 http://www.historicalpapers.wits.ac.za/index.php?1/P/Home
4. Special Books by Special Kids
 
5. Ptable
 
6. Guide to Indigenous Land and Territorial Acknowledgements for Cultural
Institutions
 http://landacknowledgements.org/
7. Biodiversity in National Parks


8. Park Score
 
9. Conservation 101: A Guide To Land & Water Protection in the US

http://www.conservationalliance.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Conservation101-Booklet-FINAL_small.pdf
10. America's National Parks Podcast
 
11. National Public Lands Day
 
12. Torched but Tough, Redwoods Fighting to Withstand California's
Wildfires

======                                ====

Subscription and Contact Information

====                                ======

To receive the electronic mail version of the Scout Report each week,
subscribe to the scout-report mailing list. This is the only mail you
will receive from this list.

The Scout Report (ISSN 1092-3861) is published every Friday of the year
except for the Fridays after Christmas and New Years by Internet Scout, located in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Department of Computer
Sciences. Funding sources have included the National Science Foundation and the
University of Wisconsin Libraries.

For information on contributors to the Scout Report, please see the Internet Scout staff page:
 

                                                                     ==
                                                                   ====
                                                                 ======

--

This message was sent to pa...@unet.com.mk by sc...@scout.wisc.edu

To forward this message, DO NOT use the forward button in your email
client. Instead, use the forward function
<https://scout.wisc.edu/phplist/lists/?p=forward&uid=748f7f0aeeea22be14fcb16b94ddf015&mid=874>
of our newsletter system
To change your details and to choose which lists to be subscribed to, visit
your personal preferences page
<https://scout.wisc.edu/phplist/lists/?p=preferences&uid=748f7f0aeeea22be14fcb16b94ddf015>
..

-- powered by phpList, www.phplist.com --


September 25, 2020
Volume 26, Number 37

General Interest

Theme: National Public Lands Day

Revisited

In the News

If you would like to make a tax-deductible contribution to support The Scout Report and the work of Internet Scout, please visit our donation page.

General Interest

Back to Top
Student Success Journal
Vocational Education

Guided by the STARS (students, transitions, achievement, retention, and success) principles, Student Success "explor[es] the experiences of students in tertiary education." Launched in 2010, the journal is "international, open-access, [and] peer-viewed," and publishes various pieces from researchers, educators, and professionals. Karen Nelson from the University of Southern Queensland serves as Editor-in-Chief, and Tracy Creagh from Queensland University of Technology is the Journal Manager. Student Success releases three editions each year. Readers will find the latest release, a special issue focused on "Enabling Excellence through Equity," on the Current page. To explore past issues, check out the Issues and Archives pages. Other browsing options can be found in the right-hand panel. For example, readers can search across issues with the query bar, narrow by author or issue in the Browse Journal box, and explore popular pieces in the Most Viewed Articles box. Additionally, readers will want to stay tuned for the 2021 special edition on "Student Success in a Global Pandemic." Slotted for publication in November of 2021, this installment will focus on educational innovations following the onset of COVID-19. For more information on this special issue and details on how to submit a paper for possible publication, check out the 2021 Special Issue section found under the Announcements tab. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Texas A&M Dinner Tonight
Social studies

Created by the Agrilife Extension Service at Texas A&M University, Dinner Tonight is designed "to provide busy families with quick, healthy, cost effective recipes that taste great." In addition to the recipe database (found under Recipes), there are also video demonstrations and useful guides in the Healthy Cooking Tips section. Readers looking for a place to begin may enjoy the two-minute video on how to measure ingredients correctly and the short guide on ensuring meals are stored safely. Especially handy for using up summer produce, the site has a big section of vegetable recipes. It is also possible to search by ingredient to retrieve additional recipes. In the Family Mealtime section, visitors will find conversation starters to make mealtime fun, family friendly recipes for picky eaters, and fact sheets on the benefits of cooking at home and eating together. Dinner Tonight's work was recognized in 2018 by the National Extension Association of Family & Consumer Sciences. [DS]

Comment on or rate this resource

Historical Papers Research Archive
Social studies

Established in 1966, the Historical Papers Research Archive is "one of the largest and most comprehensive independent archives in Southern Africa." With more than 3,000 collections spanning from the 17th century to present day, the archive memorializes human rights movements throughout history. The intentional documentation of civil society is rooted in the belief that "archives provide the bedrock for society's understanding of the past." To navigate the various collections, users may want to employ the tools on the left-side panel. Here, readers can browse by collection or search across all the collections. Clicking the "Collections Database" link (found on the Home page under Browse Collections) also allows users to sort options alphabetically. Items include newspaper clippings, amnesty applications, and committee records, among many other documents. New users may also enjoy browsing the "Historical Papers Guide" (linked under Finding Aids). Historical Papers is a project of the University of Witwatersrand's William Cullen Library and receives funding from the Atlantic Philanthropies Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Special Books by Special Kids
Social studies

Special Books by Special Kids (SBSK) shares the stories of "people in the disability/neurodiversity community." In doing so, the project "seeks to normalize the diversity of the human condition." Host Chris Ulmer first conceptualized the series when he was a teacher for students with disabilities and neurodiversities. Originally, he planned to create a book that explored life from his students' perspectives. In 2016, this vision evolved into a registered nonprofit and a YouTube channel that today has garnered more than 2.5 million subscribers and more than 500 million views. The channel has even been featured by news outlets such as ABC and BBC. Videos are typically less than 30 minutes long and cover various topics, from motherhood and mental illness to the college experience from the perspective of a student with an intellectual disability. Under Playlists, viewers can narrow videos by series, including "Love and Disability" and "A Day in the Life." For more SBSK content, viewers can follow along on Twitter (@chrisulmer) and Instagram (specialbooksbyspecialkids). [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Ptable
Science

Educators looking for ways to keep classrooms interactive in remote settings should check out Ptable, a highly regarded tool for chemistry teachers. Featuring the self-described "world's most popular periodic table," this interactive science site is packed with information and activities. A variety of unique features make Ptable stand out from similar sites. For example, data updates in realtime and is sortable by more than a dozen properties. More information about these features can be found under the About tab. Ptable can be focused on Properties, Electrons, Isotypes, and Compounds (using the corresponding tabs). The information displayed by toggling over individual elements varies based on this initial selection. For instance, the Properties view includes an element's melting and boiling points, while the Electrons view focuses on energy levels. The buttons in the upper-right corner allow users to adjust aesthetics, such as the screen width and background color. To find lesson plans that accompany the site's features, check out the Lesson Plans page under the Products tab (found at the bottom of the page). Michael Dayah created Ptable in 1997 and has frequently updated its content since. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Theme: National Public Lands Day

Back to Top
Guide to Indigenous Land and Territorial Acknowledgements for Cultural Institutions
Social studies

Educators, librarians, and community leaders may enjoy this resource, a "Guide to Indigenous Land and Territorial Acknowledgements for Cultural Institutions." The guide is designed for "institutions such as museums, archives, libraries, and universities," to promote recognition and respect for "Indigenous homelands, inherent sovereignty, and survivance." Land and territorial acknowledgements "recognizes the Indigenous peoples who have been dispossessed from homelands and territories upon which an institution was built and currently occupies and operates in." On the site, readers can download the short guide as a PDF and browse additional resources highlighted on the right-hand panel. These resources include educational materials, news articles, and multimedia presentations on land acknowledgement. Felicia Garcia (Chumash) and Jane Anderson, both from New York University (NYU), created the guide in 2018. They received support from Decolonize This Place, NYC Stands with Standing Rock, the American Indian Community House, the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums, and several other departments within NYU. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Biodiversity in National Parks
Science

Using information from the public data science site Kaggle, Biodiversity in National Parks offers unique ways to explore the species diversity found within the U.S. National Parks. A short video introduces users to the tool, including navigating the options on the left-hand panel. After watching this video, users can maneuver this "navigation panel" to explore various project features. The interactive Parks Map lets visitors zoom in on a region of interest and toggle over pinpoints to learn about parks in that region. The Species Table contains more than 100,000 plant and animal species records (filterable by order, family, and other categories). Similarly, under the Species Tree tab readers can select a park and a category to view "a collapsible hierarchical tree of the species." The Species Charts tab focuses on species quantity, while the Species Choropleth Map arranges data geographically. This project was launched in 2019 with updates made in 2020. Readers will find the code used to create this project on GitHuband RCloud (linked in the Welcome section). [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Park Score
Social studies

Readers curious or concerned about the outdoor access in their community may want to explore this resource. Notably, "across the United States, 100 million residents don't have a park within a 10-minute walk of home." The Trust for Public Land is hoping to change that with initiatives such as the Park Score Index, developed as an extension of their mission "to create parks and protect land for people, ensuring healthy, livable communities for generations to come." The Index relies on a variety of measurements, "access, investment, acreage, and amenities," to calculate its rankings. The home page summarizes the top-ranking cities and includes a search bar to look up a city of interest. Click on a city to expand data, including an analysis of park access based on income and ethnicity and breakdowns of specific amenities. Wondering which city is ranked number one in 2020? Hint: it is in the Midwest. To learn more about the methodology used to create this Index, check out the "ParkServe Methodology" link located at the bottom of each city's profile. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Conservation 101: A Guide To Land & Water Protection in the US
Science

Newcomers to land use and protection may enjoy "Conservation 101," a comprehensive reference guide compiled in 2015. The guide begins with a brief introduction to public lands in the United States and conservation generally. For example, the Public Land Conservation section includes an outline of "Government Agencies that Manage Public Lands and Affect Environmental Policy." Next, the guide explains the various protective statuses assigned to public land. Readers wondering about the difference between "wilderness" and "wilderness study areas" or "national parks" and "national monuments" will find the answers in this section. The following section shifts to private land conservation, with a focus on the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), "a Federal program that was established by Congress in 1964 to provide funds and matching grants to federal, state and local governments for the acquisition of land and water, and easements on land and water." The guide concludes with an overview of "core environmental laws," including the Endangered Species Act and National Environmental Policy Act. This resource was created through collaboration between The Conservation Alliance, the Outdoor Industry Association, and Outdoor Alliance. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

America's National Parks Podcast
Social studies

Enjoy a virtual outdoor adventure with America's National Parks Podcast. This podcast has an eye towards storytelling and "takes you behind the events, people, and nature," that have impacted "the 417 units managed by the National Park Service." The more than 120 episodes come in a variety of formats. Some episodes describe the history and future of specific parks, from King Canyon to the Wild West. Other installments explore broader historical movements (for example, "The Nine," released on June 7, 2020, discusses Brown v. Board of Education and school segregation). Monthly "News from the Parks" episodes provide brief recaps and updates, from park reopening plans during COVID-19 to legislation and funding details. Most episodes are less than 30 minutes long. On the site, readers will find embedded audio and a written synopsis of each episode. Readers can also listen on Apple Podcasts and Google Play. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Revisited

Back to Top
National Public Lands Day
Social studies

Celebrate National Public Lands Day on September 26 with this blast from the past (last featured in the 01-21-2011 Scout Report). The official website for the celebration includes several unique tools, including a NPLD Event Locator and educator toolkits.

Sponsored by the National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF), National Public Lands Day (NPLD) was started in 1994 with three federal agencies and 700 volunteers. Today, over 150,000 volunteers take part every year at over 2,000 locations across the United States. The idea for such a day came from the work of the Civilian Conservation Corps, and on this site, visitors can learn about NPLD and how they can participate. Additionally, visitors can sign up for their newsletter, find a local NPLD site, and learn about past projects. Many of this year's events will be virtual, and those interested in volunteering at and/or hosting an event will find various resources to make it a success. The "NPLD 2020: Setting Up a Virtual Event" page provides a comprehensive guide on creating safe and effective virtual experiences. Plus, site nanagers will find a page with resources curated for coordinating events. The site is also available in Spanish (found at the bottom of the site by selecting "NEEF en Espanol").

Comment on or rate this resource

In the News

Back to Top
Torched but Tough, Redwoods Fighting to Withstand California's Wildfires

2,000-year-old redwoods survive wildfire at California's oldest state park
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/2-000-year-old-redwoods-survive-wildfire-california-s-oldest-n1237949

Wildfire destroys historic buildings at Big Basin State Park, some redwoods have fallen
https://www.santacruzsentinel.com/2020/08/20/historic-buildings-destroyed-at-big-basin-redwoods-state-park/

Wildfires Hit California's Redwoods And Condors, But There's Still Hope
https://www.npr.org/2020/08/23/905268072/wildfires-hit-californias-redwoods-and-condors-but-there-s-still-hope

Redwoods and Fire
https://www.savetheredwoods.org/redwoods/fire/

California Department of Parks and Recreation: Cultural History
https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=28978#:~:text=NATIVE%20PEOPLE,Francisco%20and%20Monterey%20Bay%20areas.

Remarkable Redwoods in 360 Virtual Tour
https://www.nps.gov/redw/learn/photosmultimedia/redwoodminute360.htm

In August, weather-induced wildfires began ravaging California. These fires caused serious damage to properties and ecosystems, including the state's oldest state park, Big Basin Redwoods State Park. Unfortunately, many of the park's buildings succumbed to the flames. Yet, a glimmer of hope remains. Big Basin contains "the largest continuous stand of old-growth redwoods south of San Francisco." Several of these resilient redwood trees, built with thick, fire-resistant bark, continue to stand. This protective bark is not fail-proof, and high-intensity fires can cause serious damage or death. However, even with fires burning in their hollows, scientists "have cautious optimism," that many redwoods will hold on. The full extent of the damage is still unknown, but Sara Barth (executive director of Sempervirens Fund, a land trust preserving redwood forests) notes that these trees serve as a reminder that "redwood forests are resilient and the people of California are resilient." [EMB]

This first link leads to a story by The Associated Press, picked up by NBC News, that discusses how the forest is "resetting" in spite of the blaze. Readers wanting to delve deeper into how redwoods withstand fires will want to explore the second link, featuring Paul Rogers and Ethan Baron's coverage for the Santa Cruz Sentinel. The third link provides a clip from NPR's All Things Considered that expands on how the fires are affecting California's ecosystems, threatening both flora (redwoods) and fauna (condor birds). For more information on the relationship between redwoods and fires, visit the fourth link. Here, readers will find a series of blog posts on this topic, curated by Save the Redwoods, a nonprofit organization "protect[ing] and restor[ing] California redwoods." Those interested in Big Basin's history can find background at the fifth link on the Cotoni and Quiroste People, who first called the area home and protected it with indigenous fire and land management practices. Want to virtually explore a redwood forest? The final link leads to the National Park Service's "virtual reality" series with eight video episodes allowing viewers to do.

The Scout Report (ISSN 1092-3861) is published every Friday of the year except for the Fridays after Christmas and New Years by the Internet Scout Research Group, based in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Department of Computer Sciences.

Current Issue · Back Issues · Reproduction Information

Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages