The Scout Report -- Volume 26, Number 39

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The Scout Report
October 9, 2020
Volume 26, Number 39
-----
A Publication of Internet Scout
Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison
=======

General Interest
1. National Poetry Library
2. Early Learning in Math and Science (ELMS) Undergraduate Course in
Teacher Preparation
3. Black in Appalachia
4. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology
5. Women'n Art
Theme: US Court System
6. Oral Argument 2.0
7. Tribal Court Clearinghouse: Tribal Law
8. AnyLaw
9. SCOTUSblog
10. Oyez! Oyez! Oyez!: Simulating the Supreme Court
Revisited
11. C-SPAN Landmark Cases

If you would like to make a tax-deductible contribution to support
The Scout Report and the work of Internet Scout, please visit:
 http://scoutr.pt/donate

If you'd like to know how the Internet Scout team selects resources for
inclusion in the Scout Report, visit our Selection Criteria page at:
 

For more information on all services of Internet Scout, please
visit our Website: https://scout.wisc.edu

The Scout Report on the Web:
 Current issue: https://scout.wisc.edu/report/current
This issue:
 

Feedback is always welcome: sc...@scout.wisc.edu

General Interest

1. National Poetry Library

Home to "the largest public collection of modern poetry in the world," the
National Poetry Library is an invaluable resource for poetry readers and
writers. Poets T.S. Eliot and Herbet Read opened the library in 1953 with
support from the Arts Council, and it has been a resource for creativity
ever since. Though the building is currently closed due to COVID-19, the
robust online poetry collection allows readers to enjoy prose from afar.
The Online Poetry page (found via the menu bar) facilitates browsing
access. The Poems section (found by following the "see all poems" link on
the home page) contains more than 70 pages of poetry, sortable by format
(e.g. "text" or "audio") or topic (e.g. "arts and sciences" or "human
experience"). On the Search the catalogue page, readers can download poetry
anthologies in ebook formats (readers should note that this requires
signing up for a free membership, which is only available to UK users).
Members also gain access to audiobooks, and, for readers with visual
impairments, Braille materials delivered by mail. The rest of the website
has many other resources to explore. For example, those interested in
writing poetry may want to check out the Advice for Emerging Poets section
of the Write & Publish page. [EMB]

2. Early Learning in Math and Science (ELMS) Undergraduate Course in
Teacher Preparation
http://elmscourse.org/index.shtml

Educators facilitating in-person courses will want to check out this Early
Learning in Math and Science (ELMS) undergraduate curriculum (and those
teaching online will want to save it for the future). Developed through a
collaboration between the National Science Foundation, the University of
California Berkeley's Lawrence Hall of Science, and Los Medanos Community
College, ELMS helps "college instructors to prepare pre-service early
childhood educators to teach science and math to young children." This
comprehensive and adaptable curriculum includes 17 lesson plans (designed
for 2.5 hours per session) and provides everything an instructor needs.
Before committing to the content, educators should review the checklist
found on the Teaching the Course Overview page. These requirements help
users determine if it is a good fit. Next, educators should check out the
Pre-Course Preparation section (also found under Teaching the Course) for
planning instructions. On the General Course Docs page, instructors can
view and download preliminary materials, including a sample syllabus and
materials list. Then, each session is neatly organized on its own page
found under the Sessions tab. For each session, educators will find
instructions, multimedia materials, and printables to make planning a
breeze. Finally, the Assessing Students page provides suggested assignments
and rubrics to assist in the grading process. The curriculum was developed
by Ellen Blinderman, Ashley Barajas Montano, and Pamela Perfumo, with input
from other colleagues and advisors. [EMB]

3. Black in Appalachia

Black in Appalachia's work takes many forms, including digital archives,
documentaries, oral histories, and the <i>Black in Appalachia</i> podcast.
These different mediums all advance the same mission: "to raise the
visibility and contributions of the Black communities of the Mountain
South." The Podcast, which has its own page on the site, is co-hosted by
Dr. Enkeshi El-Amin (a researcher and lecturer) and Angela Dennis (a
journalist and activist). The show shares "historical and contemporary
stories of people, places and experiences," from the region. Though only a
few episodes have been released as of this write-up, readers should check
back periodically for new content. In the meantime, enjoy the other
resources found on the Projects page. For example, the Community History
Digital Archive highlights historical documents and images from East
Tennessee, and the <i>8th of August: Tennessee's Celebration of
Emancipation</i> video (produced by <i>PBS</i>) details an often unknown
history of the Emancipation Proclamation. To learn more about Black in
Appalachia's work, check out the Outreach and Engagement and About Us
sections of the More page, or follow their various social media channels
linked on the site. [EMB]

4. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology

As the school year is well underway, it is time to check in with teachers.
Educators struggling with increased technological classroom components may
find guidance from the <i>Australasian Journal of Educational
Technology</i>. The journal's focus on "promot[ing] research and
scholarship on the integration of technology in tertiary education," means
it is packed with articles exploring the intersection of classrooms and
computers. For example, Volume 36 Issue 3 (published in June 2020) includes
research on crowdsourcing educational technology tools and assessing
learning management systems for students in arts disciplines. To browse
this and other recent content, check out the Current tab. To explore past
pieces, from the first issue in 1985 to present, visit the Archives tab.
Additional content is available on the Early Release tab (meaning the piece
has been peer-reviewed and accepted, but was released before the next "full
issue publication"). Those interested in publishing with the journal will
find information about submitting on the Call for Special Issues tab. To
keep abreast of the journal's latest happenings, consider following them on
Twitter, @AJET_eds. The journal is published by the Australasian Society
for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education and is led by editors Eva
Heinrich (Massey University, New Zealand), Michael Henderson (Monash
University, Australia), and Petrea Redmond (University of Southern
Queensland, Australia). [EMB]

5. Women'n Art

Created by Natasha Moura (an independent writer, art curator, and
educator), <i>Women'n Art</i> is "committed to the role of women in the
arts and culture." This involves highlighting women artists and depictions
of women in art. For example, a July 29, 2020 post discusses Maria
Izquierdo, a painter who was the first Mexican woman to have a solo
exhibition of her work in the United States in 1930. Other recent posts
include "Sirens and Mermaids" (published June 17, 2020), which looks into
depictions of women as mythological creatures, from 540 B.C. up to the 21st
Century. The blog also features reviews of books such as Whitney Chadwick's
<i>Women, Art, and Society</i> (covered in an August 5, 2020 post), or of
museum exhibitions, for example the May 6, 2020 post listing exhibitors of
women artists cancelled or postponed due to the pandemic. Visitors can
filter posts by month or conduct keyword searches using the query bar. The
site also includes a list of official artist websites and museums linked
along the right-hand side of the site. [DS]

Theme: US Court System

6. Oral Argument 2.0

How would a perfectly-scripted answer to a question posed by the Supreme
Court sound? Oral Argument 2.0 has some suggestions. Using cases from the
October 2019 Term (argued throughout 2019 and 2020), Oral Argument 2.0
highlights key questions and then provides context, commentary, and
suggested answers. Featured cases are highlighted on the Home page with a
general content label (for example, "employment law" or "criminal
procedure"). Clicking on a case, readers will find background information
(including case facts and issues), as well as some "key questions from oral
argument," accompanied by a contributor's answer. For example, in <i>Barr
v. American Association of Political Consultants Inc.</i>, a case about
First Amendment rights and automated debt collector calls, Justice Kagan
presents a hypothetical. Eugene Volokh, Professor of Law at UCLA with a
focus on First Amendment law, writes his suggested reply, relying on some
key case law from his area of expertise. Not only do these questions and
answers provide legal insights, but they also display good advocacy
techniques that can apply in broader contexts. Many law professors,
students, and practitioners contribute to the project, and it receives
further support from Cornell Law's Legal Information Institute (LII),
Justia, and the Oyez Project. [EMB]

7. Tribal Court Clearinghouse: Tribal Law
http://www.tribal-institute.org/lists/tribal_law.htm

Founded in 1997, the Tribal Court Clearinghouse hosts an abundance of
resources on tribal courts and laws. As the resource notes, "tribes have
always had, and continue to retain, the sovereign authority to establish
and operate their own tribal justice systems." The Clearinghouse's Tribal
Law hub provides ten topical sections to understand tribal court systems.
The Tribal Courts section, the first option listed, is a great place to
start. It begins with some background information on the establishment of
sovereign authority under the Indian Reorganization Act. Additionally, this
section lists all United States' Tribal Courts (cataloged by state). The
remaining nine sections cover Tribal constitutions, codes, and case law,
pertinent research articles, and other key actors (including federal,
state, and law enforcement officials). Those looking for further
information on tribal court systems will want to explore the other
information hubs highlighted at the top of the site: Federal Law, State
Law, Topics, Program Resources, and Native Resources. The Tribal Law and
Policy Institute publishes the Tribal Court Clearinghouse, and links to
other resources from the organization are provided on the right-hand panel
of the website's home page. [EMB]

8. AnyLaw

What would a court system be without its cases? Promising "free legal
research for anyone, anytime, anywhere," AnyLaw is the perfect platform for
introducing aspiring legal scholars and researchers to case law.
Entrepreneur Steve Tover launched this startup, and it fills a unique need.
While many legal databases come with steep fees, AnyLaw makes a wealth of
case law available to all. For readers with a case in mind, the search bar
on the landing page provides easy access. Those needing more direction will
find several tools to tailor search results. The "Select Courts" button
allows readers to narrow by a state court or federal circuit, and the menu
in the top-right corner provides additional browsing features. For example,
visitors can search by topic, including: "administrative rulings," "civil
rights," and "health care law." After finding a case, the dropdown boxes at
the top of the page note related cases. This way, users can quickly find
other relevant cases and research materials. Readers with a free account
can click the star icon in the top-left corner to save cases for future
browsing. The button just below lets users download, save, and print the
documents as a PDF. [EMB]

9. SCOTUSblog

Providing impartial coverage on "all cases heard on the merits at the
Supreme Court and all significant petitions for certiorari,"
<i>SCOTUSblog</i> produces reliable and enjoyable content for the legal
community. Novice legal scholars may want to begin on the Resources page,
where they will find useful background information including Justices'
biographies and a glossary of key terms. Then, return to the Home page to
dive into the content. With daily "round up" posts (flagging news stories
related to the Supreme Court and its cases) and other in-depth features,
the blog is timely and comprehensive. In addition to case coverage, readers
may want to spend some time perusing the rest of the site's offerings. Data
enthusiasts will delight in the Statistics section, and the Courtroom
Access project (linked on the Special Features page) that takes an
in-depth, investigative look at people's journeys to "get a seat inside the
courtroom." Visitors may also wish to check out the Podcast page, which
houses <i>SCOTUStalk</i>, where blog contributors discuss "events and
topics relating to the Supreme Court." [EMB]

10. Oyez! Oyez! Oyez!: Simulating the Supreme Court

Regular readers are no stranger to EDSITEment's work, and perhaps have used
one of their previously featured lesson plans in their classroom (the
latest in the 04-03-2020 <i>Scout Report</i>). As the name suggests,
EDSITEMENT lesson "Oyez! Oyez! Oyez!: Simulating the Supreme Court" focuses
on the "Constitutional responsibilities and powers of the Supreme Court."
Created in 2019 by Kathryn Milschewski, this lesson plan is particularly
relevant to high school civics and history teachers. The curriculum is
designed to introduce students to the Supreme Court's role in context with
the other branches of government and includes guiding questions, four
classroom activities, handouts, and reference materials. The first activity
introduces students to the Court's purpose and function, while the second
and third activities focus on analyzing and arguing court cases (with an
emphasis on freedom of speech). Finally, the fourth activity provides
materials for a "Supreme Court simulation," where students take on the
roles of justices, attorneys, clerks, and more. Teachers looking to create
an entire Supreme Court unit may enjoy some of the "related" lesson plans
highlighted at the bottom of the page, including "John Marshall, <i>Marbury
v. Madison</i>, and Judicial Review." [EMB]

Revisited

11. C-SPAN Landmark Cases
http://landmarkcases.c-span.org/

<i>Landmark Cases continues to be a wonderful resource for educators and
history buffs. Plus, since its last feature in the 05-06-2016 Scout Report,
the series released a second season with even more legal commentary to
enjoy.</i>

These special programs, recorded from their original production on
<i>C-SPAN</i>, bring to life the drama that accompanied some of the most
important Supreme Court decisions in American history. Two seasons are
available, each with 12 episodes. Each episode, which is 90-minutes long,
provides an in-depth discussion of an influential, but often under-studied,
court case. Nearly everyone has heard of <i>Brown v. Board of Education</i>
and <i>Roe v. Wade</i>, but many other landmark cases receive less
attention. For instance, the 1905 case <i>Lochner v. New York</i>, which
overturned a New York law that limited the number of hours a baker could
work each week, had major implications on future labor laws. Landmark Cases
also unearths the controversies surrounding the decisions in <i>Marbury v.
Madison</i> (1803), <i>Scott v. Sandford</i> (1857), and <i>Baker v.
Carr</i> (1962), among others. Educators looking for ways to liven up their
civics lessons will find much to appreciate in these well produced
episodes, in which <i>C-SPAN</i> journalists interview historians and other
experts in the field of Supreme Court law. [CNH] [EMB]

For reproduction information about the Scout Report, please see:
 

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed
in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily
reflect the views of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, or the
National Science Foundation.

======                        ======

Index for October 9, 2020

======                        ======

1. National Poetry Library
 
2. Early Learning in Math and Science (ELMS) Undergraduate Course in
Teacher Preparation
 http://elmscourse.org/index.shtml
3. Black in Appalachia
 
4. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology
 
5. Women'n Art
 
6. Oral Argument 2.0
 
7. Tribal Court Clearinghouse: Tribal Law
 http://www.tribal-institute.org/lists/tribal_law.htm
8. AnyLaw
 
9. SCOTUSblog
 
10. Oyez! Oyez! Oyez!: Simulating the Supreme Court


11. C-SPAN Landmark Cases
 http://landmarkcases.c-span.org/

======                                ====

Subscription and Contact Information

====                                ======

To receive the electronic mail version of the Scout Report each week,
subscribe to the scout-report mailing list. This is the only mail you
will receive from this list.

The Scout Report (ISSN 1092-3861) is published every Friday of the year
except for the Fridays after Christmas and New Years by Internet Scout, located in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Department of Computer
Sciences. Funding sources have included the National Science Foundation and the
University of Wisconsin Libraries.

For information on contributors to the Scout Report, please see the Internet Scout staff page:
 

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October 9, 2020
Volume 26, Number 39

General Interest

Theme: US Court System

Revisited

If you would like to make a tax-deductible contribution to support The Scout Report and the work of Internet Scout, please visit our donation page.

General Interest

Back to Top
National Poetry Library
Language Arts

Home to "the largest public collection of modern poetry in the world," the National Poetry Library is an invaluable resource for poetry readers and writers. Poets T.S. Eliot and Herbet Read opened the library in 1953 with support from the Arts Council, and it has been a resource for creativity ever since. Though the building is currently closed due to COVID-19, the robust online poetry collection allows readers to enjoy prose from afar. The Online Poetry page (found via the menu bar) facilitates browsing access. The Poems section (found by following the "see all poems" link on the home page) contains more than 70 pages of poetry, sortable by format (e.g. "text" or "audio") or topic (e.g. "arts and sciences" or "human experience"). On the Search the catalogue page, readers can download poetry anthologies in ebook formats (readers should note that this requires signing up for a free membership, which is only available to UK users). Members also gain access to audiobooks, and, for readers with visual impairments, Braille materials delivered by mail. The rest of the website has many other resources to explore. For example, those interested in writing poetry may want to check out the Advice for Emerging Poets section of the Write & Publish page. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Early Learning in Math and Science (ELMS) Undergraduate Course in Teacher Preparation
Mathematics

Educators facilitating in-person courses will want to check out this Early Learning in Math and Science (ELMS) undergraduate curriculum (and those teaching online will want to save it for the future). Developed through a collaboration between the National Science Foundation, the University of California Berkeley's Lawrence Hall of Science, and Los Medanos Community College, ELMS helps "college instructors to prepare pre-service early childhood educators to teach science and math to young children." This comprehensive and adaptable curriculum includes 17 lesson plans (designed for 2.5 hours per session) and provides everything an instructor needs. Before committing to the content, educators should review the checklist found on the Teaching the Course Overview page. These requirements help users determine if it is a good fit. Next, educators should check out the Pre-Course Preparation section (also found under Teaching the Course) for planning instructions. On the General Course Docs page, instructors can view and download preliminary materials, including a sample syllabus and materials list. Then, each session is neatly organized on its own page found under the Sessions tab. For each session, educators will find instructions, multimedia materials, and printables to make planning a breeze. Finally, the Assessing Students page provides suggested assignments and rubrics to assist in the grading process. The curriculum was developed by Ellen Blinderman, Ashley Barajas Montano, and Pamela Perfumo, with input from other colleagues and advisors. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Black in Appalachia
Social studies

Black in Appalachia's work takes many forms, including digital archives, documentaries, oral histories, and the Black in Appalachia podcast. These different mediums all advance the same mission: "to raise the visibility and contributions of the Black communities of the Mountain South." The Podcast, which has its own page on the site, is co-hosted by Dr. Enkeshi El-Amin (a researcher and lecturer) and Angela Dennis (a journalist and activist). The show shares "historical and contemporary stories of people, places and experiences," from the region. Though only a few episodes have been released as of this write-up, readers should check back periodically for new content. In the meantime, enjoy the other resources found on the Projects page. For example, the Community History Digital Archive highlights historical documents and images from East Tennessee, and the 8th of August: Tennessee's Celebration of Emancipation video (produced by PBS) details an often unknown history of the Emancipation Proclamation. To learn more about Black in Appalachia's work, check out the Outreach and Engagement and About Us sections of the More page, or follow their various social media channels linked on the site. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Australasian Journal of Educational Technology
Educational Technology

As the school year is well underway, it is time to check in with teachers. Educators struggling with increased technological classroom components may find guidance from the Australasian Journal of Educational Technology. The journal's focus on "promot[ing] research and scholarship on the integration of technology in tertiary education," means it is packed with articles exploring the intersection of classrooms and computers. For example, Volume 36 Issue 3 (published in June 2020) includes research on crowdsourcing educational technology tools and assessing learning management systems for students in arts disciplines. To browse this and other recent content, check out the Current tab. To explore past pieces, from the first issue in 1985 to present, visit the Archives tab. Additional content is available on the Early Release tab (meaning the piece has been peer-reviewed and accepted, but was released before the next "full issue publication"). Those interested in publishing with the journal will find information about submitting on the Call for Special Issues tab. To keep abreast of the journal's latest happenings, consider following them on Twitter, @AJET_eds. The journal is published by the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education and is led by editors Eva Heinrich (Massey University, New Zealand), Michael Henderson (Monash University, Australia), and Petrea Redmond (University of Southern Queensland, Australia). [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Women'n Art
Arts

Created by Natasha Moura (an independent writer, art curator, and educator), Women'n Art is "committed to the role of women in the arts and culture." This involves highlighting women artists and depictions of women in art. For example, a July 29, 2020 post discusses Maria Izquierdo, a painter who was the first Mexican woman to have a solo exhibition of her work in the United States in 1930. Other recent posts include "Sirens and Mermaids" (published June 17, 2020), which looks into depictions of women as mythological creatures, from 540 B.C. up to the 21st Century. The blog also features reviews of books such as Whitney Chadwick's Women, Art, and Society (covered in an August 5, 2020 post), or of museum exhibitions, for example the May 6, 2020 post listing exhibitors of women artists cancelled or postponed due to the pandemic. Visitors can filter posts by month or conduct keyword searches using the query bar. The site also includes a list of official artist websites and museums linked along the right-hand side of the site. [DS]

Comment on or rate this resource

Theme: US Court System

Back to Top
Oral Argument 2.0
Social studies

How would a perfectly-scripted answer to a question posed by the Supreme Court sound? Oral Argument 2.0 has some suggestions. Using cases from the October 2019 Term (argued throughout 2019 and 2020), Oral Argument 2.0 highlights key questions and then provides context, commentary, and suggested answers. Featured cases are highlighted on the Home page with a general content label (for example, "employment law" or "criminal procedure"). Clicking on a case, readers will find background information (including case facts and issues), as well as some "key questions from oral argument," accompanied by a contributor's answer. For example, in Barr v. American Association of Political Consultants Inc., a case about First Amendment rights and automated debt collector calls, Justice Kagan presents a hypothetical. Eugene Volokh, Professor of Law at UCLA with a focus on First Amendment law, writes his suggested reply, relying on some key case law from his area of expertise. Not only do these questions and answers provide legal insights, but they also display good advocacy techniques that can apply in broader contexts. Many law professors, students, and practitioners contribute to the project, and it receives further support from Cornell Law's Legal Information Institute (LII), Justia, and the Oyez Project. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Tribal Court Clearinghouse: Tribal Law
Social studies

Founded in 1997, the Tribal Court Clearinghouse hosts an abundance of resources on tribal courts and laws. As the resource notes, "tribes have always had, and continue to retain, the sovereign authority to establish and operate their own tribal justice systems." The Clearinghouse's Tribal Law hub provides ten topical sections to understand tribal court systems. The Tribal Courts section, the first option listed, is a great place to start. It begins with some background information on the establishment of sovereign authority under the Indian Reorganization Act. Additionally, this section lists all United States' Tribal Courts (cataloged by state). The remaining nine sections cover Tribal constitutions, codes, and case law, pertinent research articles, and other key actors (including federal, state, and law enforcement officials). Those looking for further information on tribal court systems will want to explore the other information hubs highlighted at the top of the site: Federal Law, State Law, Topics, Program Resources, and Native Resources. The Tribal Law and Policy Institute publishes the Tribal Court Clearinghouse, and links to other resources from the organization are provided on the right-hand panel of the website's home page. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

AnyLaw
Social studies

What would a court system be without its cases? Promising "free legal research for anyone, anytime, anywhere," AnyLaw is the perfect platform for introducing aspiring legal scholars and researchers to case law. Entrepreneur Steve Tover launched this startup, and it fills a unique need. While many legal databases come with steep fees, AnyLaw makes a wealth of case law available to all. For readers with a case in mind, the search bar on the landing page provides easy access. Those needing more direction will find several tools to tailor search results. The "Select Courts" button allows readers to narrow by a state court or federal circuit, and the menu in the top-right corner provides additional browsing features. For example, visitors can search by topic, including: "administrative rulings," "civil rights," and "health care law." After finding a case, the dropdown boxes at the top of the page note related cases. This way, users can quickly find other relevant cases and research materials. Readers with a free account can click the star icon in the top-left corner to save cases for future browsing. The button just below lets users download, save, and print the documents as a PDF. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

SCOTUSblog
Social studies

Providing impartial coverage on "all cases heard on the merits at the Supreme Court and all significant petitions for certiorari," SCOTUSblog produces reliable and enjoyable content for the legal community. Novice legal scholars may want to begin on the Resources page, where they will find useful background information including Justices' biographies and a glossary of key terms. Then, return to the Home page to dive into the content. With daily "round up" posts (flagging news stories related to the Supreme Court and its cases) and other in-depth features, the blog is timely and comprehensive. In addition to case coverage, readers may want to spend some time perusing the rest of the site's offerings. Data enthusiasts will delight in the Statistics section, and the Courtroom Access project (linked on the Special Features page) that takes an in-depth, investigative look at people's journeys to "get a seat inside the courtroom." Visitors may also wish to check out the Podcast page, which houses SCOTUStalk, where blog contributors discuss "events and topics relating to the Supreme Court." [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Oyez! Oyez! Oyez!: Simulating the Supreme Court
Social studies

Regular readers are no stranger to EDSITEment's work, and perhaps have used one of their previously featured lesson plans in their classroom (the latest in the 04-03-2020 Scout Report). As the name suggests, EDSITEMENT lesson "Oyez! Oyez! Oyez!: Simulating the Supreme Court" focuses on the "Constitutional responsibilities and powers of the Supreme Court." Created in 2019 by Kathryn Milschewski, this lesson plan is particularly relevant to high school civics and history teachers. The curriculum is designed to introduce students to the Supreme Court's role in context with the other branches of government and includes guiding questions, four classroom activities, handouts, and reference materials. The first activity introduces students to the Court's purpose and function, while the second and third activities focus on analyzing and arguing court cases (with an emphasis on freedom of speech). Finally, the fourth activity provides materials for a "Supreme Court simulation," where students take on the roles of justices, attorneys, clerks, and more. Teachers looking to create an entire Supreme Court unit may enjoy some of the "related" lesson plans highlighted at the bottom of the page, including "John Marshall, Marbury v. Madison, and Judicial Review." [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Revisited

Back to Top
C-SPAN Landmark Cases
Social studies

Landmark Cases continues to be a wonderful resource for educators and history buffs. Plus, since its last feature in the 05-06-2016 Scout Report, the series released a second season with even more legal commentary to enjoy.

These special programs, recorded from their original production on C-SPAN, bring to life the drama that accompanied some of the most important Supreme Court decisions in American history. Two seasons are available, each with 12 episodes. Each episode, which is 90-minutes long, provides an in-depth discussion of an influential, but often under-studied, court case. Nearly everyone has heard of Brown v. Board of Education and Roe v. Wade, but many other landmark cases receive less attention. For instance, the 1905 case Lochner v. New York, which overturned a New York law that limited the number of hours a baker could work each week, had major implications on future labor laws. Landmark Cases also unearths the controversies surrounding the decisions in Marbury v. Madison (1803), Scott v. Sandford (1857), and Baker v. Carr (1962), among others. Educators looking for ways to liven up their civics lessons will find much to appreciate in these well produced episodes, in which C-SPAN journalists interview historians and other experts in the field of Supreme Court law. [CNH] [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

The Scout Report (ISSN 1092-3861) is published every Friday of the year except for the Fridays after Christmas and New Years by the Internet Scout Research Group, based in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Department of Computer Sciences.

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