The Scout Report -- Volume 26, Number 42 (fwd)

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The Scout Report
October 30, 2020
Volume 26, Number 42
-----
A Publication of Internet Scout
Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison
=======

General Interest
1. Amoeba Sisters
2. How rigid is the middle class in the US, really?
3. OER Tutorials
4. Mercator: It's a Flat, Flat World
5. Jewish Women's Archive: This Week in History
Theme: LGBTQ Literature
6. The Lesbrary
7. Queer Words Podcast
8. Glasgow Women's Library: LGBTQ Collections Online Resource
9. UCLA History Geography Project: Audre Lorde
10. The Bi-bliography
Revisited
11. British Library: LGBTQ Histories
In the News
12. Experts provide guidance on having a happy, healthy Halloween

If you would like to make a tax-deductible contribution to support
The Scout Report and the work of Internet Scout, please visit:
 http://scoutr.pt/donate

If you'd like to know how the Internet Scout team selects resources for
inclusion in the Scout Report, visit our Selection Criteria page at:
 

For more information on all services of Internet Scout, please
visit our Website: https://scout.wisc.edu

The Scout Report on the Web:
 Current issue: https://scout.wisc.edu/report/current
This issue:
 

Feedback is always welcome: sc...@scout.wisc.edu

General Interest

1. Amoeba Sisters

Launched in 2013 by sisters Sarina Peterson (a self-taught cartoonist) and
Brianna Rapini (a former biology teacher), the Amoeba Sisters is geared
toward high school biology teachers looking to bring creativity to their
science classrooms. Their platform provides several resources for
educators, including the <i>Amoeba Sisters</i> YouTube channel. Linked on
the Videos page (under Creations), this channel features a "series of
short, free science videos that demystify science with humor, relevance,
and a lot of comics to help students connect to the content." Most of these
videos are short, usually under 10 minutes in length, so they are a perfect
tool to introduce a new science topic or unit. On the Handouts and Resource
Links page (found under Educators) is also a great place to browse. Topics
are categorized alphabetically and links to a free video and free
accompanying resource are provided. Instructors should note that most
resource answer keys are only available via Teachers Pay Teachers (which
will require a fee to access). Looking for additional guidance on how to
incorporate these materials into a remote classroom? The "Distance Learning
During COVID-19" post, first published on Pinky's EdTech Blog (under
Educators) in March 2020 and updated in July 2020, offers insights. [EMB]

2. How rigid is the middle class in the US, really?

The term "middle class" is frequently referenced, yet the exact meaning is
often unclear. As this August 2020 data visualization essay from <i>The
Pudding</i> highlights, "for many people, the 'middle class' is just as
much about your education, job, resources, and aspirations as it is about
your paycheck." To better understand this socioeconomic metric, this story
tracks 11,172 families from the years 1968 to 2018. All of these families
"spent at least one year in the middle class." However, their specific
economic position changed over this time period. This concept of "mov[ing]
between income quintiles," is known as economic mobility. Just how much did
families' economic positions change over time? Most "move[d] at least one
quintile during their lifetimes, with nearly half moving two quintiles."
Interactive charts throughout the project explore other aspects of income
mobility, including racial disparities. Overall, the project illuminates
the importance of examining income changes over time to see a "more nuanced
picture of how the middle class is doing," and understand how "economic
conditions" shift over one's lifetime. The data used in this story comes
from the University of Michigan's Panel Survey on Income Dynamics (PSID),
and more information on the data analysis process is available in the
Methods section at the end of the piece. [EMB]

3. OER Tutorials

The Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER)
"support[s] faculty, staff, and administrators in finding, adopting, and
developing high-quality open educational resources to enhance student
learning outcomes in courses and entire degree pathways." As the world
adapted to increased online learning this year, CCCOER was at the forefront
of the transition, drawing on their expertise to guide educators. Their
summer OER Tutorials series, a five-week webinar program for open
educational resources beginners, is a great example of these efforts.
Designed for instructors and support staff, the program tackled best
practices "for student-centered instruction in fully online courses or
face-to-face courses, augmented with online components," creative commons
basics, and how to select trustworthy and accessible classroom resources,
among other key topics. Readers who missed the live presentations will find
recordings, slides, and resources from each at the link above.
Additionally, a plethora of other open educational resources can be found
on other sections of the CCCOER's website (readers may remember seeing the
full site featured in the 07-12-2019 <i>Scout Report</i>). [EMB]

4. Mercator: It's a Flat, Flat World

Maps do more than point people in the right direction; "geographical maps
are a mirror of what we, humans, know about the world around us." Few
individuals contributed more to the map-making field than groundbreaking
cartographer Gerardus Mercator. This project examines Mercator's map-making
breakthroughs and mistakes, while also recognizing his lasting legacy.
After all, "Mercator's projection is still used for making nautical and
aeronautical charts." The information is divided into four sections: Here
Be Monsters, Mercator's Map, Flat Earth, and The Legacy of Atlas. Each
section contains background information accompanied by interactive images
and charts. The menu icon in the top left-corner allows users to skip to a
chapter, rather than scrolling down the page. Additionally, readers can
view the site in English or Russian (the globe icon at the top of the page
makes this switch). <i>Mercator: It's a Flat, Flat World</i> was created by
a team including authors Daria Donina and Timur Fekhretdinov and
illustrator Anastasia Zotova. The project is also available in Russian
(found under the globe icon in the top-left corner). [EMB]

5. Jewish Women's Archive: This Week in History

Readers may be somewhat familiar with the Jewish Women's Archive (JWA) from
sections of the site that were previously featured (for example, the
Encyclopedia section was featured in the 03-08-2019 <i>Scout Report</i>).
As "the world's largest collection of information on Jewish women," the JWA
provides a wealth of information on Jewish history and identity. The
archive's This Week in History section highlights prominent Jewish women's
success and contributions, such as the birth and work of influential
photographer Annie Leibovitz and the day Caroline Klein Simon was sworn in
as Secretary of State for New York (the second woman to hold this
position). The page defaults to historical events that occurred during the
present week, and history teachers may find that this is a fun way to start
each week in their classroom (by noting important moments that occurred on
that day in the past). Additionally, the box on the left side of the page
allows users to select a date, or a range of dates, to locate important
historical events. Clicking on the "Read More" button by each entry pulls
up a synopsis or biography with sources. Readers can also subscribe and get
updates sent directly to their inbox. [EMB]

Theme: LGBTQ Literature

6. The Lesbrary

Bare bookshelves be warned, <i>The Lesbrary</i> has plenty of suggestions
to restock reading lists. The site is primarily "a book blog about bi and
lesbian books," though it does sometimes cover other current events
relevant to the LGBTQ community. Danika Leigh Ellis, a teacher based in
British Columbia, Canada, launched the blog in 2010. Since then, it has
expanded to include several other routine contributors and guest bloggers.
The site prioritizes reviews where "the main character is a queer woman or
the main subject matter is queer women," as well as books written by
authors of color and transgender authors. Recent reviews are visible on the
Home page, and a comprehensive compilation can be found on the Browse By
page. Here, posts can be sorted by genre (for example, historical fiction
or poetry), rating (on a scale of one to five stars), and representation
(including disability representation and authors of color). Readers may
also want to check out Danika's Recommendations List, highlighting some of
the founder's favorite books. [EMB]

7. Queer Words Podcast

<i>Queer Words</i> welcomes listeners into "conversations with
queer-identified authors about their works and lives." Wayne Goodman hosts
the podcast, which features a variety of authors from all different
backgrounds and locations. Listeners will find themselves immersed in
conversations with Jim Provenzano, "Lambda Literary award-winning author,
playwright, photographer, journalist, editor, and activist," (see the
August 18, 2020 episode) and Arisa White, "poet, Cave Canem fellow,
community event organizer, and professor of Creative Writing at Colby
College," (see the April 22, 2020 episode), among many others. At least one
new episode is released each week, and most installments are short (around
20 minutes in length), so prepare for binge-listening. Each episode begins
with Goodman asking guests "what qualifies you as queer," which opens up
conversations on identity, acceptance, and community. While episodes are
upbeat and good-humored, they still cover substantive topics such as
restorative justice and advocacy.  Listeners can tune in at the link above
or on popular podcast platforms such as Spotify and Apple Podcasts. [EMB]

8. Glasgow Women's Library: LGBTQ Collections Online Resource

UK readers are likely aware of the award-winning Glasgow Women's Library,
and readers around the world may delight in this opportunity to become
acquainted. The library champions women's achievements and contributions,
and also seeks to dismantle gender inequalities that continue to persist.
The library's LGBTQ Collections Online Resource draws on this mission by
highlighting some key resources from the physical Lesbian Archive in an
accessible, online format. This online resource is composed of several
collections: Early Lesbian and Gay Publications, Feminism and Lesbian
Politics, We Recuit!: Campaigns and Organisations, The Personal is
Political: Lesbian Life, and LGBTQ Life in Scotland. These collections
feature various media, including art and clothing, but a bulk of the
materials are publications, pamphlets, and other snippets of literary work.
For additional information readers may want to explore the Bibliography
page, which lists other materials used in developing the LGBTQ Collections
Online Resource. Additionally, readers on Twitter can stay up-to-date with
new additions to the Lesbian Archive by following the hashtag

  1. gwllesbianarchive. [EMB]

9. UCLA History Geography Project: Audre Lorde

World-renowned writer Audre Lorde was a "Black lesbian poet and feminist
writer," whose work explored "intersections of race, sexuality, gender,
poverty, and politics." This lesson plan uses her writing as a platform to
discuss intersectionality and identity. Specifically, it guides students to
reflect on the question: "How do power and privilege impact the
relationships people have with each other as well as with institutions?"
Instructors will find guiding questions, learning goals, links to
multimedia materials, and a PDF of Lorde's essay "Age, Race, Class, and
Sex: Women Redefining Difference." The curriculum is well-suited for
upper-level high school history classrooms, and it meets several history
and reading Common Core State Standards. The lesson plan was created by
UCLA's History-Geography Project, a group collaborating with "educational
researchers, historians and practitioners to design and lead professional
development programs that enrich K-12 history-social studies instruction."
Educators may enjoy the project's other curriculum offerings, including an
entire unit of LGBTQ History Lesson Plans. [EMB]

10. The Bi-bliography

The Bi-bliography, an online catalog of bisexual books, was created because
"too often bisexual stories are erased completely or hidden under the
LGBTQIA umbrella, making them difficult to locate." This database houses
more than 1,000 books, spanning multiple genres, including: fiction,
non-fiction, poetry, and other "queer anthologies of various types."
Various tags at the top of the page allow readers to easily search the
database. For example, those looking for "historical fiction" will find
more than 80 books under the tag. These book listings are organized in a
chart with background information, including commentary on each book's
general themes and notations if a book has won any awards. Users should
note that this database "makes no judgement on the quality of works
included," rather, it focuses on cataloging "all books containing bisexual
content in one database." Kerri Price, who identifies as "a bisexual
librarian who works in a non-library-yet-library-related setting," created
and maintains the database. It is housed on LibraryThing (last featured in
the 2010-05-07 <i>Scout Report</i>), a free service that allows individuals
and organizations to create unique book cataloging projects. [EMB]

Revisited

11. British Library: LGBTQ Histories

<i>This extensive collection was last featured in the 10-19-2018 Scout
Report. It continues to curate engaging content connecting LBGTQ history
and the present day. Readers may especially enjoy browsing the collection's
manuscripts and anthologies.</i>

The British Library has created this excellent resource that "charts the
struggles for love, identity and legislative change faced by LGBTQ
communities in the UK" going all the way back to the 1500s. Here, readers
will find a well-organized selection of articles, items from the library's
collection, people, a timeline, and works of literature, all relevant to
British LGBTQ history. Visitors can browse these materials via the tabs at
the top, or they can use the search tab to explore all the items in the
LGBTQ Histories site by keyword or by fields such as theme, date range, and
format. One of the featured items is the original manuscript of "De
Profundis," Oscar Wilde's famous letter to his lover Lord Alfred Douglas,
written during 1896-1897 while Wilde was imprisoned. Another example is a
36-minute sound recording of a January 2018 conversation and interview
between three transgender activists and Steven Dryden, the British
Library's Sound Archive and Humanities Reference Specialist. Readers will
also find some of the British Library's relevant blog posts relating to
LGBTQ history featured at the bottom of this site's main page. [JDC] [EMB]

In the News

12. Experts provide guidance on having a happy, healthy Halloween
CDC's Halloween Guidelines Warn Against Typical Trick-Or-Treating

Tips to celebrate Halloween safely during the COVID-19 pandemic

U.S. Halloween Candy Sales Are Up In 2020, Trick-Or-Treat Or Not

CDC: Holiday Celebrations

Halloween Fizzing Pumpkin Treasure Rocks

40 Kids' Halloween Movies That Won't Keep Them up All Night

As Halloween approaches, many children and caregivers may wonder how
costumes and candy will fare in the time of COVID-19. Luckily, experts at
the Center for Disease Control and Prevention released guidelines for
festivities, organized into "lower-risk, moderate-risk, and higher-risk,"
categories. While traditional trick-or-treating may be off the table,
creativity can take center stage. For example, the CDC recommends
"[h]having a virtual Halloween costume contest." And, especially in light
of the holiday's spooky roots, experts are reminding people that "[i]if
screaming will likely occur, greater distancing is advised. The greater the
distance, the lower the risk of spreading a respiratory virus." While many
traditional activities are changing due to the pandemic, some staples
remain; namely, candy sales continue to soar. So, grab a bag of candy corn
or a pumpkin- shaped chocolate and remember, with these guidelines in mind,
readers can still have a happy and healthy Halloween! [EMB]

The first link leads to Laurel Wamsley's article for <i>NPR</i>, which
describes some of the activities the CDC does and does not recommend; for
example, lower risk activities include carving pumpkins or having a
scavenger hunt (both with household members). At the second link, <i>USA
TODAY</i>'s Janet Loehrke and Veronica Bravo report additional tips for a
safe and fun Halloween celebration (relying on guidance from the CDC and
infectious disease physician Sandra Kesh). The third link adds another
interesting take: as the Associated Press reports for <i>HuffPost</i>,
while some communities have cut back typical festivities, candymakers, who
rely on Halloween for their biggest sales of the year, are seeing rising
candy sales compared to 2019. The fourth link pulls up the CDC's guidelines
for various holiday celebrations, including Halloween and Dia de Los
Muertos. Readers looking for more low risk, high fun Halloween activities
for their household may enjoy the fifth and sixth links. The fifth link
invites readers to celebrate Halloween at home with a festive and spooky
STEM activity, and the sixth site lists various family-friendly Halloween
movies. The list links to several streaming sites, so most readers will
find a title of interest available on their preferred viewing platform.

For reproduction information about the Scout Report, please see:
 

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed
in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily
reflect the views of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, or the
National Science Foundation.

======                        ======

Index for October 30, 2020

======                        ======

1. Amoeba Sisters
 
2. How rigid is the middle class in the US, really?
 
3. OER Tutorials


4. Mercator: It's a Flat, Flat World
 
5. Jewish Women's Archive: This Week in History
 
6. The Lesbrary
 
7. Queer Words Podcast
 
8. Glasgow Women's Library: LGBTQ Collections Online Resource


9. UCLA History Geography Project: Audre Lorde
 
10. The Bi-bliography
 
11. British Library: LGBTQ Histories
 
12. Experts provide guidance on having a happy, healthy Halloween

======                                ====

Subscription and Contact Information

====                                ======

To receive the electronic mail version of the Scout Report each week,
subscribe to the scout-report mailing list. This is the only mail you
will receive from this list.

The Scout Report (ISSN 1092-3861) is published every Friday of the year
except for the Fridays after Christmas and New Years by Internet Scout, located in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Department of Computer
Sciences. Funding sources have included the National Science Foundation and the
University of Wisconsin Libraries.

For information on contributors to the Scout Report, please see the Internet Scout staff page:
 

                                                                     ==
                                                                   ====
                                                                 ======

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October 30, 2020
Volume 26, Number 42

General Interest

Theme: LGBTQ Literature

Revisited

In the News

If you would like to make a tax-deductible contribution to support The Scout Report and the work of Internet Scout, please visit our donation page.

General Interest

Back to Top
Amoeba Sisters
Science

Launched in 2013 by sisters Sarina Peterson (a self-taught cartoonist) and Brianna Rapini (a former biology teacher), the Amoeba Sisters is geared toward high school biology teachers looking to bring creativity to their science classrooms. Their platform provides several resources for educators, including the Amoeba Sisters YouTube channel. Linked on the Videos page (under Creations), this channel features a "series of short, free science videos that demystify science with humor, relevance, and a lot of comics to help students connect to the content." Most of these videos are short, usually under 10 minutes in length, so they are a perfect tool to introduce a new science topic or unit. On the Handouts and Resource Links page (found under Educators) is also a great place to browse. Topics are categorized alphabetically and links to a free video and free accompanying resource are provided. Instructors should note that most resource answer keys are only available via Teachers Pay Teachers (which will require a fee to access). Looking for additional guidance on how to incorporate these materials into a remote classroom? The "Distance Learning During COVID-19" post, first published on Pinky's EdTech Blog (under Educators) in March 2020 and updated in July 2020, offers insights. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

How rigid is the middle class in the US, really?
Social studies

The term "middle class" is frequently referenced, yet the exact meaning is often unclear. As this August 2020 data visualization essay from The Pudding highlights, "for many people, the 'middle class' is just as much about your education, job, resources, and aspirations as it is about your paycheck." To better understand this socioeconomic metric, this story tracks 11,172 families from the years 1968 to 2018. All of these families "spent at least one year in the middle class." However, their specific economic position changed over this time period. This concept of "mov[ing] between income quintiles," is known as economic mobility. Just how much did families' economic positions change over time? Most "move[d] at least one quintile during their lifetimes, with nearly half moving two quintiles." Interactive charts throughout the project explore other aspects of income mobility, including racial disparities. Overall, the project illuminates the importance of examining income changes over time to see a "more nuanced picture of how the middle class is doing," and understand how "economic conditions" shift over one's lifetime. The data used in this story comes from the University of Michigan's Panel Survey on Income Dynamics (PSID), and more information on the data analysis process is available in the Methods section at the end of the piece. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

OER Tutorials
Educational Technology

The Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER) "support[s] faculty, staff, and administrators in finding, adopting, and developing high-quality open educational resources to enhance student learning outcomes in courses and entire degree pathways." As the world adapted to increased online learning this year, CCCOER was at the forefront of the transition, drawing on their expertise to guide educators. Their summer OER Tutorials series, a five-week webinar program for open educational resources beginners, is a great example of these efforts. Designed for instructors and support staff, the program tackled best practices "for student-centered instruction in fully online courses or face-to-face courses, augmented with online components," creative commons basics, and how to select trustworthy and accessible classroom resources, among other key topics. Readers who missed the live presentations will find recordings, slides, and resources from each at the link above. Additionally, a plethora of other open educational resources can be found on other sections of the CCCOER's website (readers may remember seeing the full site featured in the 07-12-2019 Scout Report). [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Mercator: It's a Flat, Flat World
Social studies

Maps do more than point people in the right direction; "geographical maps are a mirror of what we, humans, know about the world around us." Few individuals contributed more to the map-making field than groundbreaking cartographer Gerardus Mercator. This project examines Mercator's map-making breakthroughs and mistakes, while also recognizing his lasting legacy. After all, "Mercator's projection is still used for making nautical and aeronautical charts." The information is divided into four sections: Here Be Monsters, Mercator's Map, Flat Earth, and The Legacy of Atlas. Each section contains background information accompanied by interactive images and charts. The menu icon in the top left-corner allows users to skip to a chapter, rather than scrolling down the page. Additionally, readers can view the site in English or Russian (the globe icon at the top of the page makes this switch). Mercator: It's a Flat, Flat World was created by a team including authors Daria Donina and Timur Fekhretdinov and illustrator Anastasia Zotova. The project is also available in Russian (found under the globe icon in the top-left corner). [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Jewish Women's Archive: This Week in History
Social studies

Readers may be somewhat familiar with the Jewish Women's Archive (JWA) from sections of the site that were previously featured (for example, the Encyclopedia section was featured in the 03-08-2019 Scout Report). As "the world's largest collection of information on Jewish women," the JWA provides a wealth of information on Jewish history and identity. The archive's This Week in History section highlights prominent Jewish women's success and contributions, such as the birth and work of influential photographer Annie Leibovitz and the day Caroline Klein Simon was sworn in as Secretary of State for New York (the second woman to hold this position). The page defaults to historical events that occurred during the present week, and history teachers may find that this is a fun way to start each week in their classroom (by noting important moments that occurred on that day in the past). Additionally, the box on the left side of the page allows users to select a date, or a range of dates, to locate important historical events. Clicking on the "Read More" button by each entry pulls up a synopsis or biography with sources. Readers can also subscribe and get updates sent directly to their inbox. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Theme: LGBTQ Literature

Back to Top
The Lesbrary
Language Arts

Bare bookshelves be warned, The Lesbrary has plenty of suggestions to restock reading lists. The site is primarily "a book blog about bi and lesbian books," though it does sometimes cover other current events relevant to the LGBTQ community. Danika Leigh Ellis, a teacher based in British Columbia, Canada, launched the blog in 2010. Since then, it has expanded to include several other routine contributors and guest bloggers. The site prioritizes reviews where "the main character is a queer woman or the main subject matter is queer women," as well as books written by authors of color and transgender authors. Recent reviews are visible on the Home page, and a comprehensive compilation can be found on the Browse By page. Here, posts can be sorted by genre (for example, historical fiction or poetry), rating (on a scale of one to five stars), and representation (including disability representation and authors of color). Readers may also want to check out Danika's Recommendations List, highlighting some of the founder's favorite books. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Queer Words Podcast
Language Arts

Queer Words welcomes listeners into "conversations with queer-identified authors about their works and lives." Wayne Goodman hosts the podcast, which features a variety of authors from all different backgrounds and locations. Listeners will find themselves immersed in conversations with Jim Provenzano, "Lambda Literary award-winning author, playwright, photographer, journalist, editor, and activist," (see the August 18, 2020 episode) and Arisa White, "poet, Cave Canem fellow, community event organizer, and professor of Creative Writing at Colby College," (see the April 22, 2020 episode), among many others. At least one new episode is released each week, and most installments are short (around 20 minutes in length), so prepare for binge-listening. Each episode begins with Goodman asking guests "what qualifies you as queer," which opens up conversations on identity, acceptance, and community. While episodes are upbeat and good-humored, they still cover substantive topics such as restorative justice and advocacy. Listeners can tune in at the link above or on popular podcast platforms such as Spotify and Apple Podcasts. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Glasgow Women's Library: LGBTQ Collections Online Resource
Social studies

UK readers are likely aware of the award-winning Glasgow Women's Library, and readers around the world may delight in this opportunity to become acquainted. The library champions women's achievements and contributions, and also seeks to dismantle gender inequalities that continue to persist. The library's LGBTQ Collections Online Resource draws on this mission by highlighting some key resources from the physical Lesbian Archive in an accessible, online format. This online resource is composed of several collections: Early Lesbian and Gay Publications, Feminism and Lesbian Politics, We Recuit!: Campaigns and Organisations, The Personal is Political: Lesbian Life, and LGBTQ Life in Scotland. These collections feature various media, including art and clothing, but a bulk of the materials are publications, pamphlets, and other snippets of literary work. For additional information readers may want to explore the Bibliography page, which lists other materials used in developing the LGBTQ Collections Online Resource. Additionally, readers on Twitter can stay up-to-date with new additions to the Lesbian Archive by following the hashtag #gwllesbianarchive. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

UCLA History Geography Project: Audre Lorde
Language Arts

World-renowned writer Audre Lorde was a "Black lesbian poet and feminist writer," whose work explored "intersections of race, sexuality, gender, poverty, and politics." This lesson plan uses her writing as a platform to discuss intersectionality and identity. Specifically, it guides students to reflect on the question: "How do power and privilege impact the relationships people have with each other as well as with institutions?" Instructors will find guiding questions, learning goals, links to multimedia materials, and a PDF of Lorde's essay "Age, Race, Class, and Sex: Women Redefining Difference." The curriculum is well-suited for upper-level high school history classrooms, and it meets several history and reading Common Core State Standards. The lesson plan was created by UCLA's History-Geography Project, a group collaborating with "educational researchers, historians and practitioners to design and lead professional development programs that enrich K-12 history-social studies instruction." Educators may enjoy the project's other curriculum offerings, including an entire unit of LGBTQ History Lesson Plans. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

The Bi-bliography
Language Arts

The Bi-bliography, an online catalog of bisexual books, was created because "too often bisexual stories are erased completely or hidden under the LGBTQIA umbrella, making them difficult to locate." This database houses more than 1,000 books, spanning multiple genres, including: fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and other "queer anthologies of various types." Various tags at the top of the page allow readers to easily search the database. For example, those looking for "historical fiction" will find more than 80 books under the tag. These book listings are organized in a chart with background information, including commentary on each book's general themes and notations if a book has won any awards. Users should note that this database "makes no judgement on the quality of works included," rather, it focuses on cataloging "all books containing bisexual content in one database." Kerri Price, who identifies as "a bisexual librarian who works in a non-library-yet-library-related setting," created and maintains the database. It is housed on LibraryThing (last featured in the 2010-05-07 Scout Report), a free service that allows individuals and organizations to create unique book cataloging projects. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Revisited

Back to Top
British Library: LGBTQ Histories
Social studies

This extensive collection was last featured in the 10-19-2018 Scout Report. It continues to curate engaging content connecting LBGTQ history and the present day. Readers may especially enjoy browsing the collection's manuscripts and anthologies.

The British Library has created this excellent resource that "charts the struggles for love, identity and legislative change faced by LGBTQ communities in the UK" going all the way back to the 1500s. Here, readers will find a well-organized selection of articles, items from the library's collection, people, a timeline, and works of literature, all relevant to British LGBTQ history. Visitors can browse these materials via the tabs at the top, or they can use the search tab to explore all the items in the LGBTQ Histories site by keyword or by fields such as theme, date range, and format. One of the featured items is the original manuscript of "De Profundis," Oscar Wilde's famous letter to his lover Lord Alfred Douglas, written during 1896-1897 while Wilde was imprisoned. Another example is a 36-minute sound recording of a January 2018 conversation and interview between three transgender activists and Steven Dryden, the British Library's Sound Archive and Humanities Reference Specialist. Readers will also find some of the British Library's relevant blog posts relating to LGBTQ history featured at the bottom of this site's main page. [JDC] [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

In the News

Back to Top
Experts provide guidance on having a happy, healthy Halloween

CDC's Halloween Guidelines Warn Against Typical Trick-Or-Treating
https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2020/09/22/915689646/cdcs-halloween-guidelines-warn-against-typical-trick-or-treating-boo

Tips to celebrate Halloween safely during the COVID-19 pandemic
https://www.usatoday.com/in-depth/life/2020/09/24/halloween-2020-how-celebrate-safely-during-covid-19-pandemic/5807530002/

U.S. Halloween Candy Sales Are Up In 2020, Trick-Or-Treat Or Not
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/americans-halloween-candy-2020_l_5f6c999ac5b674713cc86f22

CDC: Holiday Celebrations
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/holidays.html

Halloween Fizzing Pumpkin Treasure Rocks
https://leftbraincraftbrain.com/halloween-fizzing-pumpkin-treasure-rocks/

40 Kids' Halloween Movies That Won't Keep Them up All Night
https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/holidays/halloween-ideas/g2661/halloween-movies/

As Halloween approaches, many children and caregivers may wonder how costumes and candy will fare in the time of COVID-19. Luckily, experts at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention released guidelines for festivities, organized into "lower-risk, moderate-risk, and higher-risk," categories. While traditional trick-or-treating may be off the table, creativity can take center stage. For example, the CDC recommends "[h]having a virtual Halloween costume contest." And, especially in light of the holiday's spooky roots, experts are reminding people that "[i]if screaming will likely occur, greater distancing is advised. The greater the distance, the lower the risk of spreading a respiratory virus." While many traditional activities are changing due to the pandemic, some staples remain; namely, candy sales continue to soar. So, grab a bag of candy corn or a pumpkin- shaped chocolate and remember, with these guidelines in mind, readers can still have a happy and healthy Halloween! [EMB]

The first link leads to Laurel Wamsley's article for NPR, which describes some of the activities the CDC does and does not recommend; for example, lower risk activities include carving pumpkins or having a scavenger hunt (both with household members). At the second link, USA TODAY's Janet Loehrke and Veronica Bravo report additional tips for a safe and fun Halloween celebration (relying on guidance from the CDC and infectious disease physician Sandra Kesh). The third link adds another interesting take: as the Associated Press reports for HuffPost, while some communities have cut back typical festivities, candymakers, who rely on Halloween for their biggest sales of the year, are seeing rising candy sales compared to 2019. The fourth link pulls up the CDC's guidelines for various holiday celebrations, including Halloween and Dia de Los Muertos. Readers looking for more low risk, high fun Halloween activities for their household may enjoy the fifth and sixth links. The fifth link invites readers to celebrate Halloween at home with a festive and spooky STEM activity, and the sixth site lists various family-friendly Halloween movies. The list links to several streaming sites, so most readers will find a title of interest available on their preferred viewing platform.

The Scout Report (ISSN 1092-3861) is published every Friday of the year except for the Fridays after Christmas and New Years by the Internet Scout Research Group, based in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Department of Computer Sciences.

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