The Scout Report -- Volume 26, Number 33

0 views
Skip to first unread message

Sam Vaknin author of "Malignant Self-love"

unread,
Aug 30, 2020, 9:49:16 AM8/30/20
to Article Submit Linknfactoid, Article Submit Free Books Project
The Scout Report
August 28, 2020
Volume 26, Number 33
-----
A Publication of Internet Scout
Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison
=======

General Interest
1. The Studio Museum
2. The Readout Loud
3. UNLADYLIKE 2020
4. Makeover Monday
5. Road Trips Project
Theme: Education and Equity
6. Unheard Voices: Stories of LGBT History
7. H2O Open Casebooks
8. DeafTEC: Teaching & Learning
9. The Suffrage and the Civil Rights Reform Movements
10. Teaching Strategies for Fall 2020 Course Modalities
Revisited
11. Words Without Borders Campus
In the News
12. New Research Explores Architecture, Accessibility in Ancient Greece

If you would like to make a tax-deductible contribution to support
The Scout Report and the work of Internet Scout, please visit:
 http://scoutr.pt/donate

If you'd like to know how the Internet Scout team selects resources for
inclusion in the Scout Report, visit our Selection Criteria page at:
 

For more information on all services of Internet Scout, please
visit our Website: https://scout.wisc.edu

The Scout Report on the Web:
 Current issue: https://scout.wisc.edu/report/current
This issue:
 

Feedback is always welcome: sc...@scout.wisc.edu

General Interest

1. The Studio Museum

Explore the Studio Museum's 127 building on 127th St. in Harlem, New York
from anywhere in the world with the Museum's online collections. Here,
readers will find more than 2,500 works created by more than 600 artists
spanning 200 years of history, "including paintings, drawings, sculptures,
watercolors, photographs, videos and mixed-media installations." Digital
versions of <i>Studio Magazine</i>, "a leading art publication with a focus
on contemporary artists of African descent," are also available on the
site. Plus, readers will find information about the Museum's longstanding
Artist-in-Residence program. Since its inception in 1968, this year-long
studio residency for emerging artists has served more than 100 artists of
color. Under the Learn & Engage tab's Education sub-section instructors
will find a series of downloadable lesson plans for art educators. These
lesson plans are based on work by artists in the Museum's collection, such
as "Light Brings Us Together" and "Black on Black," based on the work of
Glenn Ligon; "Printmaking & Geometry," based on the work of Robert
Blackburn; and "United Power," based on the work of Barbara Chase-Riboud.
[DS]

2. The Readout Loud

Binge listen to all things biotech with <i>The Readout Loud</i>, a podcast
that promises listeners a weekly deep-dive on the latest biotechnology news
and advances. <i>The Readout Loud</i> is produced by journalism outlet
<i>STAT</i>, which covers "health, medicine, life sciences and the
fast-moving business of making medicines." Biotech and life sciences
reporters Rebecca Robins, Damian Garde, and Adam Feuerstein host the show,
which keeps listeners updated in less than half an hour. Unsurprisingly,
COVID-19 has taken center stage in recent episodes. For example, Episode
120 provides updates on a coronavirus vaccine, and Episode 119 addresses
the question, "how can hospitals protect workers from Covid-19?" In
addition to listening to these episodes, readers can explore <i>STAT</i>'s
dedicated coronavirus page for continued COVID-19 coverage. <i>The Readout
Loud</i> team discusses other important topics, too, including dismantling
structural racism in the medical field and running a successful virtual
conference. Readers can listen and subscribe to the podcast on iTunes,
Spotify, SoundCloud, and Stitcher.  [EMB]

3. UNLADYLIKE 2020

A project of PBS, UNLADYLIKE 2020 "profil[es] diverse and little-known
American women from the turn of the 20th century, and contemporary women
who follow in their footsteps." The collection features the stories of more
than 20 women, including Gertrude Ederle (the first woman who swam across
the English Channel) and Bessie Coleman (the first African American woman
to earn a pilot license). On the Explore page readers can filter stories by
the subjects' profession, identity, geography, and historical events (for
example, "Civil Rights Movement" or "Industrialization"). Stories are
presented as short films (usually around 10 minutes long) and are
accompanied by a brief written narrative. Additionally, the stories come
with extension activities, such as classroom discussion questions and
lesson plans (check out the Learn page for more). Educators may want to
introduce these videos into curriculums to "engage and educate [students]
... in an underrepresented narrative: how women, and in particular women of
color, changed America 100+ years ago." The project was funded by several
foundations and donors, including the National Endowment for the Humanities
and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. [EMB]

4. Makeover Monday

Calling all data designers: Join more than 1,600 fellow data visualization
enthusiasts in honing skills and sharing ideas with Makeover Monday. The
project offers a free "learning and development appointment with yourself."
The site provides prompts and data sets to challenge users' data
visualization mastery. Before diving in, it may be helpful to explore the
"6 steps to your first #MakeoverMonday viz" graphic, found on the home
page. As these steps explain, Makeover Monday releases a new data challenge
each week. Visitors can view these weekly challenges (as well as archived
challenges from 2016-present) under the Data Sets page (found in the
Participate menu). Provided with a topic and a data source, users are
encouraged to create a project and share it with the rest of the community.
Designers can share their work via the Submit page (also under Participate)
and on social media channels using #MakeoverMonday. To view other community
members' submissions, check out the Makeover Monday website's Blog (found
in the Learn menu) or Gallery (found in the Participate menu). For
additional learning opportunities, readers should consider joining a weekly
webinar. Check out the Webinars tab (under Learn) to view past and upcoming
topics and create a free account for registration purposes. Makeover Monday
is made possible by partnerships with The Information Lab, Exasol, I for
Ideas, BrightTALK, and data.world. [EMB]

5. Road Trips Project

Many readers may have fond memories and photos of family or solo road trips
over the years. The Road Trips Project preserves many of these travel
pictures and perspectives from members of the South Asian American
community. As contributor Neel Agrawal reflects, "traveling has a way of
helping us navigate the many worlds that exist both inside and outside of
ourselves." However, immigrants have often been excluded from these travel
narratives about "the open road." This project reclaims space for their
stories. On the Browse page readers can explore stories by individual (via
the thumbnail and label) or location (via the pinpoints on the map). Each
submission includes the name, starting point, destination, and date, as
well as a picture, short story, and map displaying the road trip's path.
The project also welcomes reader contributions on the Submit page. Road
Trips is a project of the South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA), a
nonprofit striving toward "a more inclusive society by giving voice to
South Asian Americans through documenting, preserving, and sharing stories
that represent their unique and diverse experiences." [EMB]

Theme: Education and Equity

6. Unheard Voices: Stories of LGBT History

Recognizing "the lack of representation of lesbian, gay, bisexual and
transgender (LGBT) people in school curricula," as well as the
"disproportionate incidents of bullying and violence against LGBT youth,"
Unheard Voices: Stories of LGBT History offers educators many inclusive
instructional activities. At the link, educators can download individual
lesson plans or the entire (nearly) 50-page curriculum. Five lessons are
provided and each lesson plan meets several Common Core State Standards.
Designed for middle and high school students, lesson topics include "The
Invisibility of LGBT People in History" and "Understanding Gender
Identity." Educators will also find a series of biographies, interviews,
and transcripts from "individuals who bore witness to or helped shape LGBT
history in some way." While these interviews are included in the various
lesson plans, they also make for great stand-alone reading. Unheard Voices
is a collaboration between the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), GLSEN, and
StoryCorps. Readers who are fans of this curriculum, will find many more
resources on the ADL's Education page. [EMB]

7. H2O Open Casebooks

Legal scholars and students can happily avoid expensive textbook costs with
H20 Open Casebooks. Designed by Harvard Law School's Library Innovation
Lab, H20 Open Casebooks enables law professors to create and share
textbooks via a Creative Commons license. Professors have access to all of
the case law cataloged by Harvard's CaseLaw Access Project (readers may
remember this project from the 04-19-2019 <i>Scout Report</i>). This
provides plenty of content to create casebooks on standard and niche areas
of the law, without burdensome costs. Instructors new to the site may want
to explore the Help Guide (linked on the home page), which offers written
and video instructions. While a free account (and an academic institution
email address) are required to create a textbook, anyone can access the
existing casebooks. The "Search" button at the top of the home page invites
users to browse the more than 250 casebooks available as of this write-up,
which cover everything from "Advanced Intellectual Property/Cyberlaw" to
"Animals and the Law in Canada." [EMB]

8. DeafTEC: Teaching & Learning

Accessibility is a core tenant of equitable classrooms. DeafTEC, an
organization dedicated to "successfully integrat[ing] more deaf and
hard-of-hearing individuals into the workplace in highly-skilled technician
jobs," created this Teaching & Learning hub to ensure that classrooms are
accessible for all students. The site provides information on many topics
and projects, including resources for employers, information on STEM
careers, and sections dedicated to writing and math. The left-hand panel
organizes resources by sub-topics for easy browsing. For example, the
Online Teaching and Learning section links to accessibility guides that may
help instructors prepare for virtual learning environments. Similarly, the
Captioning Media section contains some basic information on captioning
materials to ensure accessibility. Educators will also want to check out
the Best Practices for Teaching section, which provides tips on topics
ranging from creating a welcoming environment on the first day of school to
making appropriate testing accommodations. DeafTEC is supported by the
National Science Foundation and the National Technical Institute for the
Deaf. [EMB]

9. The Suffrage and the Civil Rights Reform Movements

History teachers may enjoy this short classroom activity, "The Suffrage and
the Civil Rights Reform Movements," which invites students to "compare and
contrast" two pictures from civil rights movements that were created nearly
five decades apart. The first picture is from "a [1917] Bastille Day march
for women's suffrage," while the second image encapsulates "the 1963 March
on Washington for Jobs and Freedom." The plan includes instructions and
guiding questions (along with possible answers). The activity is designed
to last about 20 minutes. Both pictures are also linked electronically on
the site, making it an easy lesson to convert to a virtual classroom
setting. The curriculum was created by DocsTeach, a branch of the National
Archives with the mission "to engage, educate, and inspire all learners to
discover and explore the records of the American people preserved by the
National Archives." To view other lesson plans from DocsTeach, explore the
Activities and Activity Tools pages under the Menu bar. [EMB]

10. Teaching Strategies for Fall 2020 Course Modalities

Many educators are preparing for continued curriculum delivery changes,
often with online components. This teaching support guide, created by State
University of New York at Albany's Institute for Teaching, Learning, and
Academic Leadership (ITLAL), provides a variety of tips for a smooth
transition. The guide organizes resources by class structure. For example,
fully remote classrooms, hybrid models, and alternating-attendance courses
each have their own section. Plus, it covers all of the bases, from
effective lecture styles to maintaining academic integrity in remote
environments. Each sub-topic has suggestions and examples. For instance,
the "Developing a structured online activity" section provides "examples of
effective online activity and discussion prompts." Readers who enjoy this
resource will want to explore the rest of the ITLAL site, which contains
many similar resources such as the Teaching A to Z portal, where readers
will find suggestions to better understand and relate to students, as well
as tips on designing curriculum. These resources collectively contribute to
ITLAL's mission of "support[ing] evidence-based teaching and professional
practice to improve faculty careers and increase student learning." [EMB]

Revisited

11. Words Without Borders Campus

<i>Words Without Borders Campus, last featured in the 08-09-2019 Scout
Report, assists educators in creating a cross-cultural classroom.</i>

Language and literature educators interested in incorporating contemporary
international writing into their curriculum may want to check out Words
Without Borders Campus. This resource "connects students and educators to
eye-opening contemporary literature from across the globe," and aims to
"create a virtual learning space without borders, fostering meaningful
cross-cultural understandings and inspiring a lifelong interest in
international literature." Here, visitors will find stories, essays, and
poems translated into English, originating from countries like Mexico,
China, and Egypt. Most of the literature is drawn from the digital magazine
Words Without Borders (last featured in the 7-12-2019 Scout Report). Under
Find Literature, this project's resources are organized by country, genre,
and theme, with Jump To buttons leading to an essay introducing and
contextualizing each country's contemporary literature. In addition to an
English translation, each piece of literature includes vocabulary
definitions, an author's bio, contextual information such as recordings of
pronunciations in its original language, and a list of related readings.
Visitors who are logged in (after registering for a free account) can also
access Teaching Ideas for each piece, which include suggestions for ways to
foster students' engagement with the reading, potential assignments, and
relevant educational standards.

In the News

12. New Research Explores Architecture, Accessibility in Ancient Greece
Sanctuary Temples in Ancient Greece Had Accessibility Ramps, New Research
Suggests

Ancient Greeks may have built 'disability ramps' on some temples

Ramps for disabled people trace back to ancient Greece

The architecture of access: ramps at ancient Greek healing sanctuaries

The Need for Architecture That Enables, Not Disables

Architecture For All: 10 Thoughtfully Designed Buildings for People With
Disabilities

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities
Act, a law protecting against discrimination based on disability. In part,
the act prohibits "'architectural barriers' to access." However, new
research from archaeologist and professor Debby Sneed suggests that
societies were remedying these barriers long before the 20th century.
Sneed's survey of ancient Greek temples revealed that several buildings had
features designed specifically for accessibility. The study found that
healing sanctuaries often had ramps to ensure people with disabilities and
the elderly could access the spaces. While some scholars are skeptical of
the study's conclusions, primarily due to the small sample size, this
research provides insight into what may be "the earliest evidence of a
society making architectural adjustments to support accessibility." As
Sneed argues, "even without a framework of civil rights as we understand
them today, the builders of these sites made architectural choices that
enabled individuals with impaired mobility to access these spaces." [EMB]

The first link leads to George Dvorsky's article for the tech-focused news
outlet <i>Gizmodo</i>, discussing Sneed's research and some lingering
questions. At the second link readers will find an article by Laura Geggel
for <i>Live Science</i> that summarizes the study and includes some extra
commentary from Sneed on her initial inspiration and interest in the topic.
The third link features Andrew Curry's coverage for <i>Science
Magazine</i>, further delving into Sneed's research process and
highlighting some of the clues (including art depicting crutches, canes,
and other aids) that led to her conclusions. Readers interested in Sneed's
full research article can download and view it at the fourth link. The
article is published in Cambridge University Press's <i>Antiquity</i>
journal. Those who want to learn more about the need for accessibility to
be an "integral component of good design," will want to check out the fifth
link, which leads to an episode of <i>Architect Podcast Network</i>
featuring architect and accessibility activist Karen Braitmayer. For
examples of impressive universal design projects check out the sixth link,
which brings visitors to a collection of 10 architecture projects that are
innovative, attractive, and accessible.

For reproduction information about the Scout Report, please see:
 

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed
in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily
reflect the views of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, or the
National Science Foundation.

======                        ======

Index for August 28, 2020

======                        ======

1. The Studio Museum
 
2. The Readout Loud
 
3. UNLADYLIKE 2020
 
4. Makeover Monday
 
5. Road Trips Project
 
6. Unheard Voices: Stories of LGBT History


7. H2O Open Casebooks
 
8. DeafTEC: Teaching & Learning
 
9. The Suffrage and the Civil Rights Reform Movements


10. Teaching Strategies for Fall 2020 Course Modalities
 
11. Words Without Borders Campus
 
12. New Research Explores Architecture, Accessibility in Ancient Greece

======                                ====

Subscription and Contact Information

====                                ======

To receive the electronic mail version of the Scout Report each week,
subscribe to the scout-report mailing list. This is the only mail you
will receive from this list.

The Scout Report (ISSN 1092-3861) is published every Friday of the year
except for the Fridays after Christmas and New Years by Internet Scout, located in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Department of Computer
Sciences. Funding sources have included the National Science Foundation and the
University of Wisconsin Libraries.

For information on contributors to the Scout Report, please see the Internet Scout staff page:
 

                                                                     ==
                                                                   ====
                                                                 ======

--

This message was sent to pa...@unet.com.mk by sc...@scout.wisc.edu

To forward this message, DO NOT use the forward button in your email
client. Instead, use the forward function
<https://scout.wisc.edu/phplist/lists/?p=forward&uid=748f7f0aeeea22be14fcb16b94ddf015&mid=856>
of our newsletter system
To change your details and to choose which lists to be subscribed to, visit
your personal preferences page
<https://scout.wisc.edu/phplist/lists/?p=preferences&uid=748f7f0aeeea22be14fcb16b94ddf015>
..

-- powered by phpList, www.phplist.com --


August 28, 2020
Volume 26, Number 33

General Interest

Theme: Education and Equity

Revisited

In the News

If you would like to make a tax-deductible contribution to support The Scout Report and the work of Internet Scout, please visit our donation page.

General Interest

Back to Top
The Studio Museum
Arts

Explore the Studio Museum's 127 building on 127th St. in Harlem, New York from anywhere in the world with the Museum's online collections. Here, readers will find more than 2,500 works created by more than 600 artists spanning 200 years of history, "including paintings, drawings, sculptures, watercolors, photographs, videos and mixed-media installations." Digital versions of Studio Magazine, "a leading art publication with a focus on contemporary artists of African descent," are also available on the site. Plus, readers will find information about the Museum's longstanding Artist-in-Residence program. Since its inception in 1968, this year-long studio residency for emerging artists has served more than 100 artists of color. Under the Learn & Engage tab's Education sub-section instructors will find a series of downloadable lesson plans for art educators. These lesson plans are based on work by artists in the Museum's collection, such as "Light Brings Us Together" and "Black on Black," based on the work of Glenn Ligon; "Printmaking & Geometry," based on the work of Robert Blackburn; and "United Power," based on the work of Barbara Chase-Riboud. [DS]

Comment on or rate this resource

The Readout Loud
Science

Binge listen to all things biotech with The Readout Loud, a podcast that promises listeners a weekly deep-dive on the latest biotechnology news and advances. The Readout Loud is produced by journalism outlet STAT, which covers "health, medicine, life sciences and the fast-moving business of making medicines." Biotech and life sciences reporters Rebecca Robins, Damian Garde, and Adam Feuerstein host the show, which keeps listeners updated in less than half an hour. Unsurprisingly, COVID-19 has taken center stage in recent episodes. For example, Episode 120 provides updates on a coronavirus vaccine, and Episode 119 addresses the question, "how can hospitals protect workers from Covid-19?" In addition to listening to these episodes, readers can explore STAT's dedicated coronavirus page for continued COVID-19 coverage. The Readout Loud team discusses other important topics, too, including dismantling structural racism in the medical field and running a successful virtual conference. Readers can listen and subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Spotify, SoundCloud, and Stitcher. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

UNLADYLIKE 2020
Social studies

A project of PBS, UNLADYLIKE 2020 "profil[es] diverse and little-known American women from the turn of the 20th century, and contemporary women who follow in their footsteps." The collection features the stories of more than 20 women, including Gertrude Ederle (the first woman who swam across the English Channel) and Bessie Coleman (the first African American woman to earn a pilot license). On the Explore page readers can filter stories by the subjects' profession, identity, geography, and historical events (for example, "Civil Rights Movement" or "Industrialization"). Stories are presented as short films (usually around 10 minutes long) and are accompanied by a brief written narrative. Additionally, the stories come with extension activities, such as classroom discussion questions and lesson plans (check out the Learn page for more). Educators may want to introduce these videos into curriculums to "engage and educate [students] ... in an underrepresented narrative: how women, and in particular women of color, changed America 100+ years ago." The project was funded by several foundations and donors, including the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Makeover Monday
Science

Calling all data designers: Join more than 1,600 fellow data visualization enthusiasts in honing skills and sharing ideas with Makeover Monday. The project offers a free "learning and development appointment with yourself." The site provides prompts and data sets to challenge users' data visualization mastery. Before diving in, it may be helpful to explore the "6 steps to your first #MakeoverMonday viz" graphic, found on the home page. As these steps explain, Makeover Monday releases a new data challenge each week. Visitors can view these weekly challenges (as well as archived challenges from 2016-present) under the Data Sets page (found in the Participate menu). Provided with a topic and a data source, users are encouraged to create a project and share it with the rest of the community. Designers can share their work via the Submit page (also under Participate) and on social media channels using #MakeoverMonday. To view other community members' submissions, check out the Makeover Monday website's Blog (found in the Learn menu) or Gallery (found in the Participate menu). For additional learning opportunities, readers should consider joining a weekly webinar. Check out the Webinars tab (under Learn) to view past and upcoming topics and create a free account for registration purposes. Makeover Monday is made possible by partnerships with The Information Lab, Exasol, I for Ideas, BrightTALK, and data.world. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Road Trips Project
Social studies

Many readers may have fond memories and photos of family or solo road trips over the years. The Road Trips Project preserves many of these travel pictures and perspectives from members of the South Asian American community. As contributor Neel Agrawal reflects, "traveling has a way of helping us navigate the many worlds that exist both inside and outside of ourselves." However, immigrants have often been excluded from these travel narratives about "the open road." This project reclaims space for their stories. On the Browse page readers can explore stories by individual (via the thumbnail and label) or location (via the pinpoints on the map). Each submission includes the name, starting point, destination, and date, as well as a picture, short story, and map displaying the road trip's path. The project also welcomes reader contributions on the Submit page. Road Trips is a project of the South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA), a nonprofit striving toward "a more inclusive society by giving voice to South Asian Americans through documenting, preserving, and sharing stories that represent their unique and diverse experiences." [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Theme: Education and Equity

Back to Top
Unheard Voices: Stories of LGBT History
Social studies

Recognizing "the lack of representation of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people in school curricula," as well as the "disproportionate incidents of bullying and violence against LGBT youth," Unheard Voices: Stories of LGBT History offers educators many inclusive instructional activities. At the link, educators can download individual lesson plans or the entire (nearly) 50-page curriculum. Five lessons are provided and each lesson plan meets several Common Core State Standards. Designed for middle and high school students, lesson topics include "The Invisibility of LGBT People in History" and "Understanding Gender Identity." Educators will also find a series of biographies, interviews, and transcripts from "individuals who bore witness to or helped shape LGBT history in some way." While these interviews are included in the various lesson plans, they also make for great stand-alone reading. Unheard Voices is a collaboration between the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), GLSEN, and StoryCorps. Readers who are fans of this curriculum, will find many more resources on the ADL's Education page. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

H2O Open Casebooks
Social studies

Legal scholars and students can happily avoid expensive textbook costs with H20 Open Casebooks. Designed by Harvard Law School's Library Innovation Lab, H20 Open Casebooks enables law professors to create and share textbooks via a Creative Commons license. Professors have access to all of the case law cataloged by Harvard's CaseLaw Access Project (readers may remember this project from the 04-19-2019 Scout Report). This provides plenty of content to create casebooks on standard and niche areas of the law, without burdensome costs. Instructors new to the site may want to explore the Help Guide (linked on the home page), which offers written and video instructions. While a free account (and an academic institution email address) are required to create a textbook, anyone can access the existing casebooks. The "Search" button at the top of the home page invites users to browse the more than 250 casebooks available as of this write-up, which cover everything from "Advanced Intellectual Property/Cyberlaw" to "Animals and the Law in Canada." [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

DeafTEC: Teaching & Learning
Science

Accessibility is a core tenant of equitable classrooms. DeafTEC, an organization dedicated to "successfully integrat[ing] more deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals into the workplace in highly-skilled technician jobs," created this Teaching & Learning hub to ensure that classrooms are accessible for all students. The site provides information on many topics and projects, including resources for employers, information on STEM careers, and sections dedicated to writing and math. The left-hand panel organizes resources by sub-topics for easy browsing. For example, the Online Teaching and Learning section links to accessibility guides that may help instructors prepare for virtual learning environments. Similarly, the Captioning Media section contains some basic information on captioning materials to ensure accessibility. Educators will also want to check out the Best Practices for Teaching section, which provides tips on topics ranging from creating a welcoming environment on the first day of school to making appropriate testing accommodations. DeafTEC is supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

The Suffrage and the Civil Rights Reform Movements
Social studies

History teachers may enjoy this short classroom activity, "The Suffrage and the Civil Rights Reform Movements," which invites students to "compare and contrast" two pictures from civil rights movements that were created nearly five decades apart. The first picture is from "a [1917] Bastille Day march for women's suffrage," while the second image encapsulates "the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom." The plan includes instructions and guiding questions (along with possible answers). The activity is designed to last about 20 minutes. Both pictures are also linked electronically on the site, making it an easy lesson to convert to a virtual classroom setting. The curriculum was created by DocsTeach, a branch of the National Archives with the mission "to engage, educate, and inspire all learners to discover and explore the records of the American people preserved by the National Archives." To view other lesson plans from DocsTeach, explore the Activities and Activity Tools pages under the Menu bar. [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Teaching Strategies for Fall 2020 Course Modalities
Science

Many educators are preparing for continued curriculum delivery changes, often with online components. This teaching support guide, created by State University of New York at Albany's Institute for Teaching, Learning, and Academic Leadership (ITLAL), provides a variety of tips for a smooth transition. The guide organizes resources by class structure. For example, fully remote classrooms, hybrid models, and alternating-attendance courses each have their own section. Plus, it covers all of the bases, from effective lecture styles to maintaining academic integrity in remote environments. Each sub-topic has suggestions and examples. For instance, the "Developing a structured online activity" section provides "examples of effective online activity and discussion prompts." Readers who enjoy this resource will want to explore the rest of the ITLAL site, which contains many similar resources such as the Teaching A to Z portal, where readers will find suggestions to better understand and relate to students, as well as tips on designing curriculum. These resources collectively contribute to ITLAL's mission of "support[ing] evidence-based teaching and professional practice to improve faculty careers and increase student learning." [EMB]

Comment on or rate this resource

Revisited

Back to Top
Words Without Borders Campus
Language Arts

Words Without Borders Campus, last featured in the 08-09-2019 Scout Report, assists educators in creating a cross-cultural classroom.

Language and literature educators interested in incorporating contemporary international writing into their curriculum may want to check out Words Without Borders Campus. This resource "connects students and educators to eye-opening contemporary literature from across the globe," and aims to "create a virtual learning space without borders, fostering meaningful cross-cultural understandings and inspiring a lifelong interest in international literature." Here, visitors will find stories, essays, and poems translated into English, originating from countries like Mexico, China, and Egypt. Most of the literature is drawn from the digital magazine Words Without Borders (last featured in the 7-12-2019 Scout Report). Under Find Literature, this project's resources are organized by country, genre, and theme, with Jump To buttons leading to an essay introducing and contextualizing each country's contemporary literature. In addition to an English translation, each piece of literature includes vocabulary definitions, an author's bio, contextual information such as recordings of pronunciations in its original language, and a list of related readings. Visitors who are logged in (after registering for a free account) can also access Teaching Ideas for each piece, which include suggestions for ways to foster students' engagement with the reading, potential assignments, and relevant educational standards.

Comment on or rate this resource

In the News

Back to Top
New Research Explores Architecture, Accessibility in Ancient Greece

Sanctuary Temples in Ancient Greece Had Accessibility Ramps, New Research Suggests
https://gizmodo.com/sanctuary-temples-in-ancient-greece-had-accessibility-r-1844444752

Ancient Greeks may have built 'disability ramps' on some temples
https://www.livescience.com/ancient-greek-temples-disability-ramps.html

Ramps for disabled people trace back to ancient Greece
https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/07/ramps-disabled-people-trace-back-ancient-greece

The architecture of access: ramps at ancient Greek healing sanctuaries
https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/antiquity/article/architecture-of-access-ramps-at-ancient-greek-healing-sanctuaries/3C28B200442E222601E3034170F275A6

The Need for Architecture That Enables, Not Disables
https://www.architectmagazine.com/practice/the-need-for-architecture-that-enables-not-disables_o

Architecture For All: 10 Thoughtfully Designed Buildings for People With Disabilities
https://architizer.com/blog/inspiration/collections/design-for-disabilities/

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, a law protecting against discrimination based on disability. In part, the act prohibits "'architectural barriers' to access." However, new research from archaeologist and professor Debby Sneed suggests that societies were remedying these barriers long before the 20th century. Sneed's survey of ancient Greek temples revealed that several buildings had features designed specifically for accessibility. The study found that healing sanctuaries often had ramps to ensure people with disabilities and the elderly could access the spaces. While some scholars are skeptical of the study's conclusions, primarily due to the small sample size, this research provides insight into what may be "the earliest evidence of a society making architectural adjustments to support accessibility." As Sneed argues, "even without a framework of civil rights as we understand them today, the builders of these sites made architectural choices that enabled individuals with impaired mobility to access these spaces." [EMB]

The first link leads to George Dvorsky's article for the tech-focused news outlet Gizmodo, discussing Sneed's research and some lingering questions. At the second link readers will find an article by Laura Geggel for Live Science that summarizes the study and includes some extra commentary from Sneed on her initial inspiration and interest in the topic. The third link features Andrew Curry's coverage for Science Magazine, further delving into Sneed's research process and highlighting some of the clues (including art depicting crutches, canes, and other aids) that led to her conclusions. Readers interested in Sneed's full research article can download and view it at the fourth link. The article is published in Cambridge University Press's Antiquity journal. Those who want to learn more about the need for accessibility to be an "integral component of good design," will want to check out the fifth link, which leads to an episode of Architect Podcast Network featuring architect and accessibility activist Karen Braitmayer. For examples of impressive universal design projects check out the sixth link, which brings visitors to a collection of 10 architecture projects that are innovative, attractive, and accessible.

The Scout Report (ISSN 1092-3861) is published every Friday of the year except for the Fridays after Christmas and New Years by the Internet Scout Research Group, based in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Department of Computer Sciences.

Current Issue · Back Issues · Reproduction Information

Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages