Re: BREAKING: First image of supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way,

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Richard Hachel

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May 16, 2022, 1:06:07 PMMay 16
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Le 13/05/2022 à 05:20, Richard Hertz a écrit :
> FEEDING THE MIND OF PEOPLE WITH CRAP LIKE LIGO AND
> GRAVITATIONAL WAVES. This was announced today on Western media.
>
> *******************************************
>
> https://eventhorizontelescope.org/blog/astronomers-reveal-first-image-black-hole-heart-our-galaxy
>
> Astronomers have confirmed the supermassive object at the heart of the Milky Way
> galaxy is indeed a black hole and captured the first-ever images of it using a
> worldwide network of telescopes. The images were unveiled on Thursday at
> *********** multiple press conferences by a team of researchers *********** known
> as the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) Collaboration.
>
> Known as Sagittarius A, the object at the center of the Milky Way –
> “invisible, compact and very massive,” as described in a press release
> published by the European Southern Observatory – was long suspected to be a
> black hole. However, the images created through linking up a global network of
> radio telescopes provide direct proof of this hypothesis.
>
> Main points of the "multiple press conferences":
>
> 1) The images show a dark central “shadow” surrounded by a bright ring made
> up of glowing gasses, the light they produce bent by the black hole’s powerful
> gravity. The object has four million times the mass of the Sun, and is located
> 27,000 light years away from our planet.
>
> 2) Gases are orbiting the black hole at near the speed of light. EHT scientist
> Chi-kwan Chan likening the process to “trying to take a clear picture of a puppy
> quickly chasing its tail.”
>
> 3) The visuals were recorded by linking together eight radio observatories
> around the world to form what the researchers described as “a single
> ‘Earth-sized’ virtual telescope,” which was then used to observe Sagittarius
> A for hours at a time on multiple nights in 2017.
>
> 4) Powerful supercomputers and a team of more than 300 researchers from 80
> institutes, previously imaged the black hole M87 at the center of the distant
> Messier 87 galaxy, publishing those findings in 2019. Sagittarius A is much
> closer, as well as over 1,000 times smaller and less massive. However, it was
> significantly more difficult to photograph, as it was equivalent to take a picture
> of a donut on the surface of the Moon from Earth.
>
> 5) Actually, due that gases rotates around the black hole several times per
> minute, a composite picture, averaged in time, was required plus the
> corrections due to comparisons with the solutions of general relativity
> equations, until a satisfactory picture was obtained. The blurred image is
> due to the multiple averages, result of heavy post-processing in the last
> five years.
>
> 6) Accompanying the photographic findings were six papers published in the
> Astrophysical Journal Letters covering various aspects of the discovery, from the
> imaging process to the morphology of black holes.
>
> 7) The main image was produced by averaging together thousands of images
> created using different computational methods — all of which accurately fit the
> EHT data. This averaged image retains features more commonly seen in the varied
> images, and suppresses features that appear infrequently.
>
> The images can also be clustered into four groups based on similar features. An
> averaged, representative image for each of the four clusters is shown in the
> bottom row. Three of the clusters show a ring structure but, with differently
> distributed brightness around the ring. The fourth cluster contains images that
> also fit the data but do not appear ring-like.
>
> Institutional Press Releases (in alphabetical order)
>
> European Southern Observatory
> Institute of Advanced Studies
> Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie
> National Astronomical Observatory of Japan
> National Science Foundation
>
>
> ******************************************
> DISCLAIMER:
>
> The uber-doctore photograph IS NOT about OPTICAL wavelengths, but
> RADIO wavelengths, in the microwave region. So, IT'S NOT REAL!
>
> The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), an array which linked together eight existing
> RADIO observatories across the planet to form a single “Earth-sized” VIRTUAL
> telescope. The telescope is named after the “event horizon”, the boundary of
> the black hole beyond which no light can escape.
>
> The collected data, around 2017, was post-processed during 5 YEARS until
> the result MATCHED the database of possible solutions of general relativity.
>
> This is EXACTLY the same process used around LIGO for detecting gravitational
> waves. Any signal was compared with hundred of thousand of patterns
> stored in supercomputers, which are the result of different solutions of
> the equations of GR.
>
> Now, go and believe whatever you want. But you was warned about this crap.

Il parait qu'un trou noir, c'est un trou de Néant dans le vide.

Les scientifiques sont parvenus à en photographier un.

Dans un truc galacté si j'ai bien compris.

Ils l'ont dit sur BFM-TV.

R.H.

Olivier Miakinen

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May 16, 2022, 1:48:25 PMMay 16
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Le 16/05/2022 19:06, Richard Hachel a écrit :
> Le 13/05/2022 à 05:20, Richard Hertz a écrit :
>> [citation intégrale d'un long article tout en anglais]

1) Ce groupe est francophone.
2) <http://www.usenet-fr.net/fur/usenet/repondre-sur-usenet.html> §3a §3b

> Il parait qu'un trou noir, c'est un trou de Néant dans le vide.
>
> Les scientifiques sont parvenus à en photographier un.
>
> Dans un truc galacté si j'ai bien compris.

Tu le fais exprès ou tu es vraiment idiot à ce point ?


--
Olivier Miakinen

Richard Hachel

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May 16, 2022, 2:26:26 PMMay 16
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Bah non, je l'ai entendu sur BFM-TV. Il paraît qu'en plein milieu du
vide de l'espace, au centre de
la galaxie, il y a un trou dans rien, et que tout ceux qui passent à
côté tombent dedans en s'étirant comme des spaghettis.

Mais il paraît que ça fait pas mal et que ceux à qui ça arrive ils se
rendent compte de rien, car le temps s'étire et leur chute de trois
secondes dans le trou dure mille ans pour eux.

Encore heureux que ça fait pas mal, ta douleur de trois secondes, elle
en finirait pu.

Et il paraît mais là, c'est une hypothèse, que mille ans après, tu
ressors de l'autre côté par une fontaine.

Renseignes-toi Olivier, tu verras que je dis pas des conneries.

R.H.




Olivier Miakinen

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May 17, 2022, 11:00:19 AMMay 17
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Le 16/05/2022 20:26, Richard Hachel m'a répondu :
>>
>>> Il parait qu'un trou noir, c'est un trou de Néant dans le vide.
>>>
>>> Les scientifiques sont parvenus à en photographier un.
>>>
>>> Dans un truc galacté si j'ai bien compris.
>>
>> Tu le fais exprès ou tu es vraiment idiot à ce point ?
>
> Bah non, je l'ai entendu sur BFM-TV.

Même le « si j'ai bien compris » tu l'as entendu sur BFM-TV ?

La conclusion en tout cas, c'est que BFM-TV ne doit pas être pris comme
une source fiable d'informations scientifiques.

> [...]
>
> Renseignes-toi Olivier, tu verras que je dis pas des conneries.

Tu en écris aussi ?

Quoi qu'il en soit, d'après ce que tu en rapportes je n'irai pas me
renseigner sur BFM-TV.

--
Olivier Miakinen

Richard Hachel

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May 17, 2022, 11:06:11 AMMay 17
to
Oui, pour ce qui est des émissions scientifiques, ils sont un peu
dépassés.

Mais pour ce qui est de la politique, ils ne sont pas si mal. Très
impartiaux et très honnêtes dans leur travail. C'est la meilleure
chaîne d'information indépendante, il paraît.

R.H.


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