HUMAN-NETS Digest V8 #18

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Jun 8, 1985, 12:08:48 AM6/8/85
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From: Charles McGrew (The Moderator) <Human-Nets-Request@Rutgers>


HUMAN-NETS Digest Friday, 7 Jun 1985 Volume 8 : Issue 18

Today's Topics:
Query - request for assistance,
Response to Query - ASIS,
Computers and the Law - Privacy Law,
Computers and People - The Electronic Wish List (2 msgs) &
Paper vs. CD Books (2 msgs)

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Date: 20 May 1985 0736-EDT
From: Amsel...@CECOM-1.ARPA
Subject: request for assistance...

Greetings,

An unusual request for the human-nets... I am an electronics engineer
working in the support environment of military Battlefield Automated
Systems (BASs). My request is such... Does anyone have or know of
software availability for a 16 bit Sperry Microcomputer running under
CPM-UTS 30 (CPM+). This is to be used in an area surrounding hospital
applications. Any and all help this area would be appreciated.


Please respond to:

Snail Mail: Ed Keezer
Software Development & Suppo Center
ATTN: AMSEL-SDSC-SC-T
Building 1210
Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703
Phone: (201) 532-1674 (commeal)
992-1674 (autovon)

MILNET: [KEEZER]:AMSEL-SDSC at CECOM-1

Many Thanks...

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 17 May 85 12:24:13 cdt
From: Don Kraft <kraft%lsu....@csnet-relay.arpa>
Subject: ASIS Response
Cc: WBD...@office-2.csnet

In answer to the request for information about the American
Society for Information Science (ASIS), as a longstanding member
and as the editor for the Journal of the American Society for
Information Science (JASIS), I am happy to be able to respond. I
hope that you will be able to put this out on the net so others
may see it.

ASIS is the professional society for those working in the area of
information science, which is certainly an interdisciplinary
field. They publish a handbook and directory, a bi-monthly bul-
letin, a monthly newsletter, and, of course, the journal. They
hold two meetings annually, and have a variety of special interest
groups (e.g., language processing, office of the future, computer-
ized retrieval, foundations of information science, international
information issues, library automation and networks, management,
medical information, law and information technology, numeric data-
bases, storage and retrieval technology, and user online interac-
tion, to mention just a few). They also have local chapters in
several cities, and many college campuses have student chapters.

I have an address (1010 Sixteenth Street, N.W., Washington, DC
20036) and a telephone number ( (202) 659-3644 ) for ASIS. More-
over, anyone who cares to write to me, or to the society itself,
can get a brochure describing the society and an application form.
Moreover, organizations may wish to consider an institutional
membership.

Potential authors of research articles should consider submitting
articles on your work to me for consideration for publication in
JASIS. I have enclosed a copy of the "Scope of JASIS" which
should show you the breadth of coverage of the journal.

Thank you for your consideration and interest in ASIS and
JASIS.


1. Theory of Information Science 4. Applied Information Science

Foundations of Information Science Informations systems design --
Information theory tools, principles, applications
Bibliometrics Case histories
Information retrieval -- Information system operations
models and principles Standards
Evaluation and measurement Information technology -- hardware
Representation, organization, and and software
classification of information Automation of information systems
Artificial intelligence and natural Online retrieval systems
language processing Office automation and records
management

2. Communication 5. Social and Legal Aspects of
Information
Theory of communication
Non-print media Impact of information systems and
Man-machine interaction technology upon society
Network design, operation, and Ethics and information
management Legislative and regulatory aspects
Models and empirical findings about History of information science
information transfer Information science education
User and usage studies International issues

3. Management, Economics, and Marketing

Economics of information
Management of information systems
Models of information management decisions
Marketing and market research studies
Special clientele -- arts and humanities,
behavioral and social sciences, biological
and chemical sciences, energy and environment,
legal, medical, and education.

Authors may also send in brief communications, scholarly opinion
pieces, and even letters to the editor.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 17 May 85 10:30:10 EDT
From: Brint Cooper <a...@BRL.ARPA>
To: Hoffm...@XEROX.ARPA
Cc: Info...@SRI-CSL.ARPA
Subject: Re: Privacy Law and the Computer

If you view the computer as an extension of your desk, then it appears
that US Government employees may have no privacy rights except those
specifically spelled out by law or regulation. So our phones may not
be wiretapped because that is expressly forbidden, except for issues
involving "national security." And we may not be required to give our
social security number on a form unless we wish to be reimbursed for
official travel expenses. And so on.

At any time, it seems, the appropriate authorities can search our
government desks, file cabinets, and offices. So, then, why not our
computer files?


Brint
ARPA: a...@brl.arpa
UUCP: ...{decvax,cbosgd}!brl-bmd!abc

Dr Brinton Cooper
U.S. Army Ballistic Research Laboratory
Attn: AMXBR-SECAD (Cooper)
Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5066

Offc: 301 278-6883 AV: 283-6883 FTS: 939-6883

------------------------------

Date: 17 May 85 09:47 EDT
From: (David H M Spector) <SPE...@NYU-CMCL1.ARPA>
Subject: RE: HUMAN-NETS Digest V8 #17

Hmmm. It sounds to me like the basic structure of CCITT X.400. This
is the proposed international standard for message handling systems,
including voice, fax, teletex, etc. Although some of the DataBase
functionality that is described isn't strictly X.400, its implied in
the standard that UAs (User Agents - Read: Front Ends to Mailers) may
provide such services.


David Spector
NYU/acf Systems Group

------------------------------

Date: Friday, 17 May 1985 10:48-EDT
From: sde@Mitre-Bedford
Subject: Re: HUMAN-NETS Digest V8 #17

See PARTI on The SOURCE for a tree-structured conference/BB system.

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 25 May 85 17:39:10 EST
From: Jerry E. Pournelle <POURNE@MIT-MC>
Subject: paper vs. CD books
To: goutal%parrot.DEC@DECWRL

Your essay is insteresting but there is this: one mivht not want
the encyclopedia at the beach, but one might want a medly of a
buncha books on a trip. I do not believe cd rom will wipe out
books for whiles and whiles, but--
according to hitachi you can manufacture a cdrom disk for under
five dollars. that is high compared to a paperback, but it is
low compared to a hardbound (or at least right in line). That
is also early on the learning curve. I cannot believe the
privce will rise (as it has for printed books) as thechnology
advances. You need not putt the complete works of Niven on one
disk; how about two or three of his books? And so what, the
disk could have held more. You could have put more pages in a
bnook, too.
I dunno. I do believe the cd rom is going to make some
profound changes. but then the micros are doing that anyway.
pournelle

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 4-Jun-85 03:11:50 PDT
From: vortex!lauren@rand-unix (Lauren Weinstein)
Subject: CD ROMS
Cc: VIDE...@SRI-CSL.ARPA

Sometime ago we were arguing (excuse me, DISCUSSING) how much digital
info on CD's (so-called CD ROMs) would cost. Some argued that it
would be very cheap (since the disks are theoretically cheap in
quantity). My suspicion was that it could tend to be fairly
expensive, depending on the particular information.

Well, I've found one firm already selling data on CD's. They provide
Library of Congress Card Catalog info. It is available on a
subscription basis only, one disk delivered quarterly. Cost is
(approx.) $800/yr. (subscription is on a yearly basis only). Whether
or not you consider this expensive depends on your point of view, of
course.

As for the RGB outputs on the newer Sony CD players--they are for the
graphics CD standard. Except for one problem--the standard isn't
really a standard yet--arguing is still going on. NOBODY is currently
putting any graphics on the discs (except for one-of-a-kind demos) due
to the current confusion about the "standard."

--Lauren--

------------------------------

End of HUMAN-NETS Digest
************************

human...@ucbvax.arpa

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Jun 8, 1985, 3:05:22 AM6/8/85
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