Emoji: chart updated with font glyph images

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Markus Scherer

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Jan 7, 2009, 1:37:46 AM1/7/09
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Dear Emoji enthusiasts,

We have posted a new version of the Emoji symbols chart:

Thanks to Apple, we now have a preliminary Emoji symbols font with representative glyphs.
Thanks to Microsoft, we have image files for the glyphs in this font.
The updated chart shows these image files for the proposed new characters.

We also changed the chart slightly to clarify what will or will not be part of the proposal.
  • Symbols proposed for encoding are shown with their font glyph image and a red "U+xxxxx".
  • Symbols unified with existing Unicode 5.1 characters are shown as characters, and with their code points in black.
  • Symbols unified with upcoming Unicode 5.2 (AMD6) characters are shown with "U5.2" and their code points in black.
  • We changed temporary notes to gray text color and made it explicit that they are temporary. These will not become formal annotations (unless we move some of their contents into real proposed annotations).
The contents (set of characters/unifications and character names) are so far little changed from when we posted the chart for public review. We moved substantive feedback into project issues, discussed most of them, and are in the process of making changes as necessary. (While we do so, the issues will move out of the Open Issues categorization.)

We will continue to update the chart as we resolve issues and receive and assess new feedback.

Please continue to send feedback to this emoji4...@googlegroups.com address. We especially appreciate further feedback about unifications/disunifications with existing or upcoming Unicode characters, feedback about the proposed character names, and feedback about the proposed representative glyphs.

Thanks, best regards, and happy new Gregorian year,
markus

Rick McGowan

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Jan 7, 2009, 11:45:01 AM1/7/09
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The new font makes this easier to evaluate.

One minor comment...

Re e-54E and e-53F... The *pictures* of the pushpin and thumbtack show
objects that are both called "pushpin", at least in the English that I
speak. A thumbtack has a flat back like a nail, never a round or
projecting back. I would suggest that one be called "round pushpin" and
the other "pushpin" or something... Or even "pushpin 1" and "...2".

Rick

Markus Scherer

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Jan 7, 2009, 1:29:27 PM1/7/09
to emoji4...@googlegroups.com, katm...@gmail.com
Hi Rick,

On Wed, Jan 7, 2009 at 8:45 AM, Rick McGowan <ri...@unicode.org> wrote:
Re e-54E and e-53F... The *pictures* of the pushpin and thumbtack show
objects that are both called "pushpin", at least in the English that I
speak. A thumbtack has a flat back like a nail, never a round or
projecting back. I would suggest that one be called "round pushpin" and
the other "pushpin" or something... Or even "pushpin 1" and "...2".

Thumbtack and pushpin seem to be synonymous:

Google Translate gives the following for KDDI's Japanese symbol names:
e-53F プッシュピン(画鋲) = "Pushpin (pushpin)"
e-54E がびょう = "Thumbtack"

Does anyone have a clue why KDDI has two separate symbols here?

markus

Kat Momoi

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Jan 7, 2009, 1:52:19 PM1/7/09
to Markus Scherer, emoji4...@googlegroups.com
2009/1/7 Markus Scherer <marku...@gmail.com>

画鋲/がびょう (e-54E) refers to a generic pin that is used to pin an item, while プッシュピン/push pin is a specific type of pin that has a non-flat head.  Historically, がびょう is older while プッシュピン came in later in the language. This type of accommodation happens fairly often in Japanese, i.e. an older term assumes a general word status while a newer term takes a specific portion of the semantic space.

- Kat


--
Katsuhiko Momoi
mo...@google.com

Markus Scherer

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Jan 7, 2009, 3:01:03 PM1/7/09
to Kat Momoi, emoji4...@googlegroups.com
On Wed, Jan 7, 2009 at 10:52 AM, Kat Momoi <katm...@gmail.com> wrote:
画鋲/がびょう (e-54E) refers to a generic pin that is used to pin an item, while プッシュピン/push pin is a specific type of pin that has a non-flat head.  Historically, がびょう is older while プッシュピン came in later in the language. This type of accommodation happens fairly often in Japanese, i.e. an older term assumes a general word status while a newer term takes a specific portion of the semantic space.

How about we call e-53F "round map pin" and leave e-54E "thumbtack"?

markus

Rick McGowan

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Jan 7, 2009, 3:07:16 PM1/7/09
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> How about we call e-53F "round map pin" and leave e-54E "thumbtack"?

Except that *neither* of them is what I call a generic thumbtack, so I
would prefer "map pin" and "push pin"... The generic thumbtack always
has a flat head.

Rick


Markus Scherer

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Jan 7, 2009, 3:19:14 PM1/7/09
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Well, I find http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thumbtack ambiguous about all of these distinctions (and I am not a native speaker). If you do an image search for "thumbtack" you will mostly get ones looking like e-54E, and an image search for "map pin" is not all that clear either.

I could live with
e-53F "round map pin"
e-54E "pushpin"

but I am also open to further suggestions and references.

markus

Christopher Fynn

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Jan 10, 2009, 2:52:03 AM1/10/09
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"Thumbtack" is very North American - in other English speaking
countries "drawing pin" is used.

- C

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