Dremelfuge "Ultra"

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Cathal Garvey

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Mar 21, 2010, 5:44:42 PM3/21/10
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Hi all,
Just thought I'd update people on my progress with the Dremelfuge.
After a design revision which is now "official" and for sale on Shapeways, the Dremelfuge can hold tubes securely, with liquid load, up to the full speed of a Dremel 300. At a top speed of 33,000 RPM, this means the tubes experience about 52,000RCF (g).

For scale, my lab centrifuge used daily does up to 14,000g and I've never practically needed higher. I gather high gees are used to perform sucrose gradients, and I'm told that 52,000g is enough to pellet DNA. I'll be sure to experiment.

Youtube video to come in the near future, so far I've used it hand-held and spun down "Innocent Smoothie", which yielded a thick pellet of solids, a quasi-clear area of supernatant and a ring of fats on top. That wasn't a very long spin, perhaps 30 seconds; I'd like to bolt the tool somewhere safe before doing much more.

Anyway, there you have it. The Dremelfuge has hit big-time at 52,000g.

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Derek

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Mar 21, 2010, 8:00:13 PM3/21/10
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Awesome! My makerbot is due to arrive this week and after I get it all
put together this is one of the first things I intend to print.

Thanks!

--Derek

On Mar 21, 2:44 pm, Cathal Garvey <cathalgar...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi all,
> Just thought I'd update people on my progress with the Dremelfuge.
> After a design revision which is now "official" and for sale on Shapeways,
> the Dremelfuge can hold tubes securely, with liquid load, up to the full
> speed of a Dremel 300. At a top speed of 33,000 RPM, this means the tubes
> experience about 52,000RCF (g).
>
> For scale, my lab centrifuge used daily does up to 14,000g and I've never
> practically needed higher. I gather high gees are used to perform sucrose
> gradients, and I'm told that 52,000g is enough to pellet DNA. I'll be sure
> to experiment.
>
> Youtube video to come in the near future, so far I've used it hand-held and
> spun down "Innocent Smoothie", which yielded a thick pellet of solids, a
> quasi-clear area of supernatant and a ring of fats on top. That wasn't a
> very long spin, perhaps 30 seconds; I'd like to bolt the tool somewhere safe
> before doing much more.
>
> Anyway, there you have it. The

> Dremelfuge<http://www.shapeways.com/model/77306/dremelfuge_recessed_edition.html>has

Nathan McCorkle

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Mar 22, 2010, 10:45:24 AM3/22/10
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Not sure I can tell what the difference is?

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Cathal Garvey

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Mar 22, 2010, 11:42:40 AM3/22/10
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Visually it's subtle, but it has to do with the way the tubes are held.

The original used a tapered grip so that tubes slid into a position where they were gripped and prevented from slipping out through the uncovered rotor top during use. However, it turned out the plastic would just break and slip through at above 14,000g. No surprise really.

The new Dremelfuge uses a recessed shelf instead, so that tubes are held by the 0.5mm 'lip' at the top of standard tubes, minipreps etc. It turns out this lip is well capable of taking the strain, at least with the brand I'm using.

As always, it's a fast spinning rotor and I can never guarantee that your results will match mine or that it'll be safe to use. Use with caution if at all. It's officially sold for decorative purposes.

On Mar 22, 2010 2:45 PM, "Nathan McCorkle" <nmz...@gmail.com> wrote:

Not sure I can tell what the difference is?

On Sun, Mar 21, 2010 at 5:44 PM, Cathal Garvey <cathal...@gmail.com> wrote: > Hi all, > Just tho...

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> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups > "DIYbio" group. > To p...

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Nathan McCorkle
Rochester Institute of Technology
College of Science, Biotechnology/Bioinformatics

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Phil

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Mar 22, 2010, 12:35:41 PM3/22/10
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On Mar 21, 5:44 pm, Cathal Garvey <cathalgar...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi all,
> Just thought I'd update people on my progress with the Dremelfuge.
> After a design revision which is now "official" and for sale on Shapeways,
> the Dremelfuge can hold tubes securely, with liquid load, up to the full
> speed of a Dremel 300. At a top speed of 33,000 RPM, this means the tubes
> experience about 52,000RCF (g).

That's awesome. Now we need a way to get it to stand up and stay
on for a timed run in the refrigerator.

BTW, Eppendorf announced a new centrifuge. It does the
work of both a microcentrifuge and a bucket centrifuge,
and spins plates, too.

Cathal Garvey

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Mar 22, 2010, 12:39:27 PM3/22/10
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I've been considering a slide-spinning centrifuge rotor for replacement of the cytospin, seeing as that thing is so hideously overpriced. I already designed and priced a replacement plastic piece for the cytospin on Shapeways; via rapid prototyping, the least efficient way to produce plastic, it's less than half the price of buying the plastic parts from the company that makes them.

Would be interesting to see the new combi-centrifuge, but I don't think I'll ever see one in person. The equipment market from big bio is just too stupidly priced. We'll have invented our own by the time the price on that thing falls to the price of a small house.


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Simon Quellen Field

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Mar 22, 2010, 1:34:52 PM3/22/10
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Something that might be fun is attaching a Peltier cooler to the Dremelfuge
part, powered by a coil and a diode.  You spin it near a magnet to generate the
power.  Encase it in the plastic so parts don't fly off.  Now you don't need the
fridge.

Meredith L. Patterson

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Mar 23, 2010, 3:31:48 AM3/23/10
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On Mon, Mar 22, 2010 at 5:35 PM, Phil <phil...@gmail.com> wrote:
> That's awesome.  Now we need a way to get it to stand up and stay
> on for a timed run in the refrigerator.

Dremel already makes a drill press attachment that will hold the
Dremelfuge in the right position, though I haven't dug my drill press
out of the box it's buried in to find out whether there's enough
clearance for the Dremelfuge+eppies. I think there is.

You'd have to take the shelves out, but it would fit in a refrigerator.

Cheers,
--mlp

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