Round 3266: FINEER Results

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Daniel B Widdis

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Jul 15, 2022, 11:29:42 AMJul 15
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Anyone counting the votes would have observed two things: first, that every definition received at least one vote, so a D0 would be impossible; and second, that the only definition receiving more than two votes was #2, which received five. So regardless of which definition was the real one, it should come as no surprise that definition #2's author is the next dealer.  Congratulations and commiseration to Efrem Mallach, who gets to deal back-to-back.

 

The "Real Rules" include this useful tidbit for dealers selecting a woid, that I was well aware of: "Words with multiple meanings cause trouble because players may know one definition but not others, and the trouble is compounded if the dealer does not post all of the definitions given in the source. Experienced dealers recommend that both kinds of trouble are best avoided."  I expect that 3266 may be added as an additional cautionary precedent to that entry, although to be fair I did post all of the definitions given in the source. Just not… together.

 

My original source had a single definition for "fineering" similar to the definition posted as #10.  When entering it into a search engine, I saw it attested to in a few other well known dictionaries as "fineer" with the search result preview showing the definition I posted. That was good enough for me to post the woid, as I figured I'd do the copy-paste exercise later.

 

Only when I was preparing the update post did I click on the link and realize that not only were there multiple meanings, but that Tim Lodge's definition (#5) was almost an exact match for that second meaning.

 

Oops.

 

In hindsight, I should have combined Tim's definition with the real one and presented both the transitive verb and intransitive verb together, not unlike the "Keating Def" that Tim Lodge expertly spotted.  In the moment, however, I was reluctant to reduce the list from 10 to 9, and decided based on arguably sketchy logic that Tim's def seemed more like the noun while the real second meaning was a verb "to veneer".

 

As to scoring, I pondered briefly awarding points to those guessing at Tim's def, as if they had voted for the real def (since in a way they had) but ultimately decided against it.  Sorry, Judy and Debbie. You picked the “wrong” real def.

 

Paul Keating was an early DQ, saying he knew the woid.  I never asked him which of the two meanings he knew, of course.  John Barrs was the only player to vote for #10, leaving me with a highly footnoted D1.

 

1. decoration on the top of a gable or spire.

   Submitted by: Judy Madnick, who voted for 4 & 5 and scored 1

   Votes from: Shani Naylor

  

2. Patent leather (orig. a trademark).

   Submitted by: Efrem Mallach, who voted for 3 & 7 and scored 5

   Votes from: Mike Shefler, John Barrs, Tim Lodge, Deborah Fein, Debbie Embler

  

3. Fermented goat cheese.

   Submitted by: Mike Shefler, who voted for 2 & 8 and scored 1

   Votes from: Efrem Mallach

  

4. Flexible veneer.

   Submitted by: John Barrs, who voted for 2 & 10 and scored 1 + 2 = 3

   Votes from: Judy Madnick

  

5. Obs. veneer.

   Submitted by: Tim Lodge, who voted for 2 & 9 and scored 2

   Votes from: Judy Madnick, Debbie Embler

  

6. A blur in printing, as from a double impression.

   Submitted by: Shani Naylor, who voted for 1 & 9 and scored 1

   Votes from: Deborah Fein

  

7. An Indonesian dessert made with coconut milk, rice flour, and pandan leaves, also called bubur sum-sum.

   Submitted by: Deborah Fein, who voted for 2 & 6 and scored 1

   Votes from: Efrem Mallach

  

8. The fashion effect the 18th-century Beau Monde male wanted to achieve with little effort or nonchalance.

   Submitted by: Debbie Embler, who voted for 2 & 5 and scored 1

   Votes from: Mike Shefler

  

9. Now arch. and rare. 1. trans. To wipe away; to wipe clean, cleanse. Also occas. intr. 2. trans. fig. To purge.

   Submitted by: Paul Keating, who voted for DQ &  and scored 2

   Votes from: Tim Lodge, Shani Naylor

  

10. To run in debt by getting goods made up in a way unsuitable for the use of others, and then threatening not to take them except on credit.

   Submitted by: Webster's 1913 and scored D1

   Votes from: John Barrs

 

   Def Submitter           Votes Guess Total

     2 Efrem Mallach           5           5

     4 John Barrs              1     2     3

     5 Tim Lodge               2           2

     9 Paul Keating            2           2

     1 Judy Madnick            1           1

     3 Mike Shefler            1           1

     6 Shani Naylor            1           1

     7 Deborah Fein            1           1

     8 Debbie Embler           1           1

    10 Webster's 1913          1          D1

 

 

 

 

 

 

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