Retention Policies?

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Dave Bauer

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Mar 24, 2010, 12:49:30 PM3/24/10
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I was listening to a podcast and one guy was discussing that ideally stuff posted online on social networks would have a expiration date. Has anyone thought about that? Very interesting concept.

Dave
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Dave Bauer
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Hans Granqvist

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Mar 24, 2010, 1:05:18 PM3/24/10
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We did some work at this ~4-5 years ago -- it was quite interesting.
You could define when content would be available and for whom by using
common cryptography. For example, embargoed material could be
pre-published and based on target audience made available at different
times.

In practice, as we know, such DRM is impossible unless everyone plays
by the rules.

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Dave Bauer

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Mar 24, 2010, 1:15:45 PM3/24/10
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On Wed, Mar 24, 2010 at 1:05 PM, Hans Granqvist <ha...@granqvist.com> wrote:
We did some work at this ~4-5 years ago -- it was quite interesting.
You could define when content would be available and for whom by using
common cryptography. For example, embargoed material could be
pre-published and based on target audience made available at different
times.

In practice, as we know, such DRM is impossible unless everyone plays
by the rules.

Of course, if its anywhere available publically, then its essentially available via Google forever. Unless they honored the policy it would be less useful. Its an exciting idea, but seems impossible except in limited application.

Dave
 

Elias Bizannes

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Mar 24, 2010, 1:20:16 PM3/24/10
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Check out the User Managed Access (UMA) Project. Eve Maler, who is one of the co-inventors of internet standards like XML and SAML - is now knee-deep developing this new open technology to allow for people to control their personal information.

The way it would work, is that you would give a feed and attached to it would be rules on usage, including expiration. An example would be I give Facebook http://eliasbizannes.com/UMA/2010-social-network-data which would be an XML feed that has my current town, relationship status, friends,and whatever else - and I would set an expiration on that URI for 31 December 2010. Meaning, when Facebook polls that feed on 1 January 2011, it would not longer exist.

Podcast with Eve discussing it http://datawithoutborders.net/dwb6/


I'm also finding the developments in disposable information interesting. Some university researchers have come up with a way that allows digital information to expire and "self-destruct". I wrote about it here: http://eliasbizannes.com/blog/2009/07/an-invention-that-could-transform-online-privacy-and-media/


There's also the non-technical solutions: MySpace's Data Availability implementation was innovative from a policy point of view. The policy required that if you retrieved information, after 24 hours you had to delete it.


Elias Bizannes
http://eliasbizannes.com


On Wed, Mar 24, 2010 at 9:49 AM, Dave Bauer <dave....@gmail.com> wrote:

Chris Messina

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Mar 24, 2010, 7:36:39 PM3/24/10
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On Wed, Mar 24, 2010 at 10:20 AM, Elias Bizannes <elias.b...@gmail.com> wrote:
There's also the non-technical solutions: MySpace's Data Availability implementation was innovative from a policy point of view. The policy required that if you retrieved information, after 24 hours you had to delete it.

I think MySpace has actually removed this limitation, as it has proven too onerous in practice — not only for developers willing to play by the rules — but more importantly — for MySpace to enforce (except in extreme cases of abuse). Facebook has similar rules as well — and though well-intentioned, do create a burden in implementing services that rely on third-party data.

For some tasty bedtime reading, take a look at the MySpaceID Developer Addendum to MySpace.com Terms of Use Agreement:


In theory, yes, you can throw DRM on anything — but it's never really what people want. Having data that expires or times out is also interesting, I suppose, but much harder to enforce or really provide on the open web.

I suppose it depends on your audience, and how many hoops they're willing to jump through to get to your data.

Chris
 


Elias Bizannes
http://eliasbizannes.com


On Wed, Mar 24, 2010 at 9:49 AM, Dave Bauer <dave....@gmail.com> wrote:
I was listening to a podcast and one guy was discussing that ideally stuff posted online on social networks would have a expiration date. Has anyone thought about that? Very interesting concept.

Dave
--
Dave Bauer
da...@solutiongrove.com
http://www.solutiongrove.com


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Chris Messina
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