plate tectonics origin brainstorming

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johnkeeb

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Feb 9, 2022, 4:34:41 PMFeb 9
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I was thinking more of Tiamats breakup in near space. There must have been rocky bits of all sizes and shapes scattered around, smashing into each other, sometimes breaking, sometimes joining. All the water released during the collision would have been turned into ice by space-cold. With less mass than stony material, the ice would have been the last major layer to accumulate on anything, mostly becoming water vapor passing through an atmosphere. I dont recall the storys detailswas Tiamat completely destroyed in the collision? There probably was a chunk big enough left to retain some atmosphere and thus some liquid water. Any idea where that chunk went? Did that chunk become the major component of Earth? Seems unlikely as the spacing of the rest of Sols family probably was much the same then as now, meaning an Earth existed at the time.

Thanks!

John Keebaugh

Andy Lloyd

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Feb 10, 2022, 4:52:45 AMFeb 10
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I've been collecting information on the blog recently which adds into the mix.  Firstly, regarding John's point about the leftover remains of an impactor within Earth, such evidence does exist.  It is thought to relate to the impactor 'Theia' which brought about the formation of the Moon.  I wrote this a few months ago:

 

"Deep within the Earth under southern Africa, there exists a dense region of matter known as the 'African Large Low Shear Velocity Province'.  Seismological data suggests that this dense region lies in between the Earth's mantle and its hot liquid outer core.  The latter contains the turbulent molten iron which is thought to generate the Earth's magnetic flux.  If the dense chunk of matter moves between the layers, bobbing up and down on the welling liquid sea that makes up the core, then that may affect local magnetic conditions and thus create the observed anomaly.

Which brings us back to Theia, or at least what may remain of this proto-planet.  


In a paper submitted to the 52nd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, scientists from Arizona State University have suggested that the remnants of the impactor planet Theia are one and the same as the deep, dense chunk lying deep below the African continent ( https://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2021/pdf/1980.pdf  ).  This would work if the remnants of the impactor planet were iron rich, and therefore capable of sinking deep through the proto-planet Earth's bulk silicate mantle."

GIANT IMPACT ORIGIN FOR THE LARGE LOW SHEAR VELOCITY PROVINCES. Q. Yuan1*, M. M. Li1, S. J. Desch1 and B. Ko1, 1Arizona State University, School of Earth and Space Exploration, PO Box 876004, Tempe, AZ85287-6004, USA. *qyu...@asu.edu Introduction: The Moon is widely recognized as formed from the “Giant Impact”: when at least a Mars-
Andy Lloyd 'Theia and Pole Reversals' 28th October 2021 https://www.andylloyd.org/darkstarblog85.htm


Also, it is thought that the surface of the Earth was entirely covered in water after its initial molten state cooled.  At some point, the first landmass emerged - known as a 'craton'.  New evidence suggests that this occurred earlier than previously thought.  perhaps 3.3 billion years ago - based upon geological evidence with sedimentary rock formation ( https://www.livescience.com/earth-first-continents-cratons-study  ).  Perhaps it was earlier still - coinciding with the period directly after the Nibiru encounter when Tiamat's waters were spilled (~3.9 gyr ago?).  This geological issue seems to revolve around how sedimentary rocks are laid down - requiring slow formation rather than turbulent rendering apart.  I'm not sure this gets us anywhere nearer the truth, but it shows how the early 'water world' did look more like Sitchin's Tiamat.
Earth's first continents, known as the cratons, emerged from the ocean between 3.3 billion and 3.2 billion years ago, a new study hints.


Andy Lloyd "Emerging from the Water World" 17th November 2021 https://www.andylloyd.org/darkstarblog86.htm




Many thanks, 

Andy Lloyd

BSc(Hons) PGCE PGCAP HEA RGN









From: dark-star...@googlegroups.com <dark-star...@googlegroups.com> on behalf of johnkeeb <john...@ix.netcom.com>
Sent: 09 February 2022 21:34
To: dark-star...@googlegroups.com <dark-star...@googlegroups.com>
Subject: plate tectonics origin brainstorming
 

I was thinking more of Tiamats breakup in near space. There must have been rocky bits of all sizes and shapes scattered around, smashing into each other, sometimes breaking, sometimes joining. All the water released during the collision would have been turned into ice by space-cold. With less mass than stony material, the ice would have been the last major layer to accumulate on anything, mostly becoming water vapor passing through an atmosphere. I dont recall the storys detailswas Tiamat completely destroyed in the collision? There probably was a chunk big enough left to retain some atmosphere and thus some liquid water. Any idea where that chunk went? Did that chunk become the major component of Earth? Seems unlikely as the spacing of the rest of Sols family probably was much the same then as now, meaning an Earth existed at the time.

Thanks!

John Keebaugh

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Thomas Tipton

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Feb 10, 2022, 10:55:25 PMFeb 10
to Andy Lloyd, DSgroup, john...@ix.netcom.com
You would think by now we would have some definitive proof that circulating molten iron generates a magnetic field.  My understanding is that iron loses it's magnetic characteristics at those temperatures.  Maybe it's the Earth/Sun electrical connection that generates the field, as that electron flow has exposure to a lot of ferrous mineral in the crust that arent molten.  Maybe this also sheds light on how that molten material rotates faster than the crust?  

MK23666

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Feb 11, 2022, 4:58:44 PMFeb 11
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The inner core is pretty solid, even at it's high temperature due to the pressure of the rest of the Earth around it. That solidness may allow the core's magnetic field to stay intact, additionally the outer core being liquid to semi liquid, is moving through that magnetic field and that should induce an electric current to run through the liquid which in turn should amplify the magnetism of the inner core in a kind of feedback loop.

Thomas Tipton

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Feb 11, 2022, 6:47:32 PMFeb 11
to mk2...@gmail.com, Dark Star Planet X
Is the core solid?  Or is that just something we've been told?  Is there even a core?  Let's agree that a solid core is still just a hypothesis.  Let's leave ourselves open to explanations that fit actual observations.  I have been watching a great paradigm shift whereby cosmologists are acknowledging the significance of electromagnetic interaction between astronomical bodies at every scale.  I think it's time to consider an electro-physical model of solar system genesis that does't rely on gravity to do the heavy lifting.  I think electrical engineers and plasma physicists may already have a handle on what we might expect to find and so far their betting record has been pretty remarkable.

MK23666

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Feb 11, 2022, 10:24:26 PMFeb 11
to Dark Star Planet X
New research suggests that Earth's 'solid' inner core is, in fact, endowed with a range of liquid, soft, and hard structures which vary across the top 150 miles of the inner core. ... In the 1950's, researchers suggested the inner core was solid, in contrast to the liquid metal region surrounding it. Oct 6, 2021

Is the Earth's core solid or molten?
Earth's lopsided core growth

Far beneath our feet, Earth's inner core is solid iron, very hot and very dense. It's surrounded by a molten iron-nickel outer core (whose flow generates Earth's magnetic field) and a rocky mantle that's mostly solid but which, over eons of time, moves slowly.
Jun 14, 2021

Is Earth's inner core solid?
The structure of Earth's inner core has been a mystery since its discovery in 1936. Physicists originally thought it was solid, but a new study suggests it's somewhere between solid and liquid.
2 days ago

Earth's inner core is 'superionic', a state of matter somewhere - ABC


Seems that it may not be totally solid after all ... 


wayne james

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Feb 17, 2022, 5:33:01 AMFeb 17
to Mark Keller, dark-star...@googlegroups.com
Nice idea but when you run high electrical charge around iron it heats up really quickly and turns red hot in a matter of seconds. This is at the surface under experiment so no idea how the pressure would affect it. 

Rotation though is due to the electrical current flow through the core from pole to pole. The 2 poles oppose each other in relation to field flow. Hence the naval of the earth (it's 3 pole) moves of long periods of time. 

Kind regards
Wayne

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