LaGrangian Point and Nibiru

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Andy Lloyd

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Feb 14, 2022, 1:17:39 PMFeb 14
to Dark Star Planet X
Hey guys,

I've been thinking about the 'ferry' meaning for the ancient Sumerian name Nibiru.  In 2005, I suggested Nibiru was a moon of the Dark Star that swung through the solar system during perihelion.  There are some challenges with this idea to do with the 'Hill's sphere'.  This is the radius of influence around a planet within which a planet can hold onto its moons when passing other planetary bodies.  This would potentially be an issue during perihelion for a loosely bound 'moon' or ferry.

As a possible alternative, such a 'ferry' could be located at the Dark Star's L1 LaGrange point.  This could solve a number of issues.  I've written about this on the Dark Star site at https://www.darkstar1.co.uk/solution.html

"Each planet has five LaGrange points, the stability of which vary with location.  L4 and L5 are relatively stable, running along the orbital path of the planet itself.  In Jupiter's case, these areas are home to the Greeks and Trojans respectively.  If objects accompanying the Dark Star were located at L4 or L5 then they would share the planet's orbital path (either as heralds or followers).  Let's consider Jupiter's less celebrated L1 position:

Jupiter_LaGrange.jpg

"L1 is between the Sun and Jupiter, where their gravities both balance perfectly! Interestingly, L1 has a smaller orbit path than Jupiter’s, but an object in L1 has the same orbital period as Jupiter." (9)

"L1 is about 0.3 AU away from Jupiter.  Given that the Dark Star's own orbit is absolutely massive, the distance between this its L1 point and the binary companion would be very considerable - perhaps of the order of 30 AU for a Planet X object located 500 AU away.  The Dark Star's L1 position could therefore be located ~30AU closer to the Sun, along the Dark Star/Sun axis.  A loosely bound object located here might pass considerably closer to the planetary zone of the solar system than the Dark Star itself as both swing around the Sun, and thus offer a staging post for travel between the two systems."

Your thoughts either way are most welcome..

Andy Lloyd


Alan Cornette

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Feb 14, 2022, 4:34:36 PMFeb 14
to Andy Z, dark-star-planet-x
They parked the new Webb telescope at the LaGrange point between earth and sun (if I remember correctly) and I"m wondering if they must adjust it somewhere in future time. But the earth's orbit does change but very minimally (so slow that the telescope would not be affected) according to the Milankovitch Cycle.Some statements from the books of Chilam Balam: "Then there shall come the seven mountains and the red star, and in the wind-swollen sky the house of the storms in the 17 Tun." This has always meant to me that the Red Star (Nibiru) has/had seven satellites, or did at one time. And, as you suggested, those planets may not all be with Nibiru at this time. Maybe one or two of them are in close orbit to Nibiru so as not to cause too much disturbance when moving through perihelion. And I believe the Anunnaki lives on a satellite of Marduk - living in the Red Glow of Planet X. Al C.   

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Alan Cornette

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Feb 14, 2022, 10:47:42 PMFeb 14
to Andy Z, dark-star-planet-x
There's a lot of space between Jupiter and Mars, enough to allow PlanetX with satellites to pass through the Ecliptic Plane (at about a 47 degree angle?) without disturbing the inner planets too much.  That is, if the inner planet locations were in more distant positions - the other side of the sun?  I have no idea how to calculate how long it would take to pass through the plane but Sitchin describes how Anu had a 17 day window in which to leave earth and rendezvous with Nibiru heading back out to apogee. Maybe one of Nibiru's satellites could be regarded as a ferry that passed close enough to Mars - why Mars was mentioned as a relay station coming to and leaving earth. Al C. 

Andy Lloyd

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Feb 15, 2022, 4:26:45 AMFeb 15
to Alan Cornette, dark-star-planet-x
Yep, and I was reading yesterday that a retrograde orbit. might be important factor here.  The astrophysicist Sean Raymond has been doing some fun calculations on how many planets you could pack into a star system.  Lots, apparently, particularly if some of them were revolving in the opposite direction:

""If two planets in different orbits are going in the same direction, then they have a longer time to encounter each other as they pass, which creates a larger gravitational kick," Raymond said. "However, if they are going in the opposite direction, they zoom past each other and interact for a shorter amount of time," which means they can be closer together without colliding or scattering."  (see https://www.livescience.com/maximum-number-of-planets-orbit-sun )
Nibiru is famously retrograde.  That opposing motion would help prevent 'perturbations' in orbits during flybys.  It would also make it more difficult to rendezous with the ferry'.  I'm thinking of an analogy... perhaps a Duke of Hazzard stunt where Bo and Luke launch the General Lee onto the back of a freight train that's heading towards them.

Many thanks, 

Andy


From: Alan Cornette <alanco...@gmail.com>
Sent: 15 February 2022 03:47
To: Andy Z <andy...@hotmail.com>; dark-star-planet-x <dark-star...@googlegroups.com>
Subject: Re: LaGrangian Point and Nibiru
 

Andy Lloyd

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Feb 15, 2022, 8:09:31 AMFeb 15
to Alan Cornette, dark-star-planet-x
I came across this today, Al - As you say, the JWT is parked in a LaGrange point:





Many thanks, 

Andy Lloyd

BSc(Hons) PGCE PGCAP HEA RGN









From: Alan Cornette <alanco...@gmail.com>
Sent: 14 February 2022 21:34

To: Andy Z <andy...@hotmail.com>; dark-star-planet-x <dark-star...@googlegroups.com>
Subject: Re: LaGrangian Point and Nibiru

johnkeeb

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Feb 15, 2022, 10:06:37 AMFeb 15
to dark-star...@googlegroups.com

Andy,

One of the suppositions needed for this to work is that the Nibiru orbits Sol and has few, or at least small moons orbiting inside its L1-L2 points. Otherwise, there would definitely be collisions around Mars!!

 

So the ferry is at the Nibiru’s L1 position and the Nibiru is about 530AU further out from Mar’s orbit? That would drag it’s L1 position through Mar’s L2 position and the ferry could switch allegiances with a small fuel burn in the direction opposite that of Nibiru but within the plane of Mar’s orbit? Nibiru would continue on its way far outside the Sol system and probably not disrupt it at all? Probably best if the Nibiru’s planetary disc (maybe just a flock of moons) was somewhere between a 45 degree and 135 degree angle to the plane of Mar’s orbit? And the Nibiru L1 position would have to be moving faster than Mars does along its orbit for the L1 (Mars) to be overtaken by the L2 (Nibiru). Jupiter and the outer big planets might have had to be on the opposite side of Sol for this to work without collisions or theft of planets from Sol!

 

Does this match what you are thinking?

 

Thanks!

John Keebaugh

 

From: dark-star...@googlegroups.com [mailto:dark-star...@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Alan Cornette
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2022 8:47 PM
To: Andy Z; dark-star-planet-x
Subject: Re: LaGrangian Point and Nibiru

 

There's a lot of space between Jupiter and Mars, enough to allow PlanetX with satellites to pass through the Ecliptic Plane (at about a 47 degree angle?) without disturbing the inner planets too much.  That is, if the inner planet locations were in more distant positions - the other side of the sun?  I have no idea how to calculate how long it would take to pass through the plane but Sitchin describes how Anu had a 17 day window in which to leave earth and rendezvous with Nibiru heading back out to apogee. Maybe one of Nibiru's satellites could be regarded as a ferry that passed close enough to Mars - why Mars was mentioned as a relay station coming to and leaving earth. Al C. 

 

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 4:34 PM Alan Cornette <alanco...@gmail.com> wrote:

They parked the new Webb telescope at the LaGrange point between earth and sun (if I remember correctly) and I’m wondering if they must adjust it somewhere in future time. But the earth's orbit does change but very minimally (so slow that the telescope would not be affected) according to the Milankovitch Cycle. Some statements from the books of Chilam Balam: "Then there shall come the seven mountains and the red star, and in the wind-swollen sky the house of the storms in the 17 Tun." This has always meant to me that the Red Star (Nibiru) has/had seven satellites, or did at one time. And, as you suggested, those planets may not all be with Nibiru at this time. Maybe one or two of them are in close orbit to Nibiru so as not to cause too much disturbance when moving through perihelion. And I believe the Anunnaki lives on a satellite of Marduk - living in the Red Glow of Planet X. Al C.   

 

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 1:17 PM Andy Lloyd <andy...@hotmail.com> wrote:

Hey guys,

 

I've been thinking about the 'ferry' meaning for the ancient Sumerian name Nibiru.  In 2005, I suggested Nibiru was a moon of the Dark Star that swung through the solar system during perihelion.  There are some challenges with this idea to do with the 'Hill's sphere'.  This is the radius of influence around a planet within which a planet can hold onto its moons when passing other planetary bodies.  This would potentially be an issue during perihelion for a loosely bound 'moon' or ferry.

 

As a possible alternative, such a 'ferry' could be located at the Dark Star's L1 LaGrange point.  This could solve a number of issues.  I've written about this on the Dark Star site at https://www.darkstar1.co.uk/solution.html

 

"Each planet has five LaGrange points, the stability of which vary with location.  L4 and L5 are relatively stable, running along the orbital path of the planet itself.  In Jupiter's case, these areas are home to the Greeks and Trojans respectively.  If objects accompanying the Dark Star were located at L4 or L5 then they would share the planet's orbital path (either as heralds or followers).  Let's consider Jupiter's less celebrated L1 position:

 

Jupiter_LaGrange.jpg

"L1 is between the Sun and Jupiter, where their gravities both balance perfectly! Interestingly, L1 has a smaller orbit path than Jupiter’s, but an object in L1 has the same orbital period as Jupiter." (9)

"L1 is about 0.3 AU away from Jupiter.  Given that the Dark Star's own orbit is absolutely massive, the distance between this its L1 point and the binary companion would be very considerable - perhaps of the order of 30 AU for a Planet X object located 500 AU away.  The Dark Star's L1 position could therefore be located ~30AU closer to the Sun, along the Dark Star/Sun axis.  A loosely bound object located here might pass considerably closer to the planetary zone of the solar system than the Dark Star itself as both swing around the Sun, and thus offer a staging post for travel between the two systems."

 

Your thoughts either way are most welcome..

 

Andy Lloyd

 

 

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image001.jpg

Andy Lloyd

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Feb 17, 2022, 5:26:59 AMFeb 17
to dark-star...@googlegroups.com, john...@ix.netcom.com
I guess I'm trying to balance a lot of things here, John.  Spinning plates.

Let's say 'Marduk' is the main planet:  A significant world in a highly eccentric orbit, currently lying way out there.  Nibiru is the ferry between us and it.  Could be a moon, some speculate a spacecraft.  I'll go with a moon.  It's not a habitable, close-set moon, but one that's on the fringe (like our Pluto) and can penetrate the Sun's planetary zone during Marduk's perihelion. 

Okay, so looking at the evidence - extended scattered disk objects (ETNOs) indicate clustering due to an external body.  That effect is presumed to be due to a distant Planet X body that never gets very close.  Let's argue that that assumption is wrong - that Planet X does come much closer, rather like a comet.  If Planet X is essentially a super-comet, then it could obviously penetrate into the inner solar system, as Sitchin envisages.  But if it's a significant planet doing this, then it would be disruptive to lots of orbits, including its own, causing scattering.  Not to mention the orbit-altering Kosai effect coming into play.

So this is why I consider Marduk's approach to be a less up-close and personal one.  Let's say it comes up to about 60AU at perihelion, twice the distance of Neptune.  At that distance, it could affect the orbits of the ETNOs causing the alignments that are so suggestive of Planet Nine.  But then it could swing way out into the abyss (much further than anticipated for Planet Nine), explaining why it's been so tough to find these last 5 years.

The what of the ferry, Nibiru?  If that is a loosely bound object located at some distance from Marduk, then it could make a deeper incursion into the Sun's territory during Marduk's perihelion passage.  I had thought it might be a classical moon, orbiting at a huge distance from Marduk, but as you say it would like get nicked by the Sun during one of these incursions.  Too far out of Marduk's Hills Sphere.  That's why I'm wondering about the L1 point which I calculate would be about 30AU closer to the Sun if Marduk's semi-major axis is ~500AU, and perhaps a lot more if we extend Marduk's orbit out to the 1000s of AU at aphelion.  In which case Marduk's L1 (with Nibiru in it) might make it into the solar system proper during Marduk's perihelion.  Bingo.

I seem to have been grappling with this forever.  Perhaps Nibiru is really a comet, or a spacecraft.  That would make my life a lot easier!

Let's say Sitchin was right all along, and Nibiru is just a terrestrial-sized world with a (relatively) short orbit of just 3600 years (semi-major axis 'just' 250AU).  Its retrograde orbit would help prevent undue scattering during perihelion, even if it did penetrate into the inner solar system.  But... the capabilities for finding a planet at these relatively small-scale distances have been pretty high for some time now.  A mars-sized world might have evaded detection.  Not a Planet Nine-like Super-Earth.  And Sitchin hypothesised that it was 10 Earth masses, rather like Planet Nine.  Further, the bigger it gets, the more unlikely that it could sweep through the inner solar system without upsetting the whole apple cart.  Then there's habitability of a cold rock in deep space.  So, his original theory is also not without its problems.  To work in this way, Nibiru is shrinking in size with every passing decade.


Many thanks, 


From: dark-star...@googlegroups.com <dark-star...@googlegroups.com> on behalf of johnkeeb <john...@ix.netcom.com>
Sent: 15 February 2022 15:06
To: dark-star...@googlegroups.com <dark-star...@googlegroups.com>
Subject: LaGrangian Point and Nibiru
 

Andy Lloyd

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Feb 17, 2022, 7:33:17 AMFeb 17
to dark-star...@googlegroups.com
Here's an image I've knocked up to explain how this L1 position might work for Nibiru 'The Ferry':





Many thanks, 

Andy Lloyd



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